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Comment: Re:Anti-Rich People Rhetoric (Score 1) 2115

by vegetasaiyajin (#37449872) Attached to: White House Proposes "Wealthy Tax"

My comment was an oversimplification, but consumer spending is not what drives growth. They are correlated, but consuming just for the sake of consuming is not what generates growth. Actually, underconsumption can generate growth as it results in more savings available in banks for productive capital investment, which does generate growth.
I am not against higher taxes for the rich, as they benefit more from the services the state offers (e.g., more protection of their private property, possibly higher use of infrastructure, and so on), but the concept of economic growth being a consequence of spending is wrong. It is the other way around. This belief is a big part of what is causing the crises these days.

Comment: Re:Anti-Rich People Rhetoric (Score 1) 2115

by vegetasaiyajin (#37444164) Attached to: White House Proposes "Wealthy Tax"

You are confusing correlation with causation. What you say is true if rich people kept their money as cash under their beds or in a safe.
The reality is that money is put in banks, which lend the money to businesses which produce stuff and hence create economic growth. This results in an increase in consumption (because there is more to consume). You believe that it is consumption that causes economic growth, when in fact it is the opposite.

Comment: Re:Norway isn't a member of the EU. (Score 1) 350

And it's not "good enough", being a member of the EU means you have to follow laws agreed by the EU, and if Norway's not in the EU, and EU has this law against looking up digital skirts, and Norway doesn't, it means it won't be illegal in Norway...

Unfortunately, on this point being part of the EEA is as good as being part of EU. We must pass all EU directives unless we veto them, and in the 17 years since we joined we never have. We refused to join EU in a referendum in 1994, but our politicians did the next best thing. By passing the EEA agreement we did not give any sovereignty since in theory all is decided by our parliament, but it's practically impossible to say no. So we're as good as a member, except we don't get to take part in any decision processes - we made ourselves an EU serfdom instead of an EU member.

In addition to being an EU serfdom, you have to pay food at twice the price, because being EEA means you don't participate in the common EU market for agricultural products. This means your politicians can "protect" your monopolist food producers from competition from the rest of the EU. Next time, vote "yes".

Comment: Re:not like other countries would do that (Score 1) 248

by vegetasaiyajin (#34525818) Attached to: Venezuelan Gov't Seeks Internet Content Bill

And Chavez is not a dictator - yet. He's pushing in that direction, but he was popularly elected, and is still operating under a constitutional framework. He's done quite a few good things for Venezuela, but he's started turning down the dark path of too much power.

Can you elaborate on the quite a few good things?

Comment: Re:The final step. (Score 4, Informative) 248

by vegetasaiyajin (#34525800) Attached to: Venezuelan Gov't Seeks Internet Content Bill

Government is only following the corporate masters, moving us not in the direction of socialism but in the direction of fascism.

That is not fascism. That is called mercantilism or reverse-mercantilism by some, which has many similarities to socialism as corporations and the government look like a larger colluding entity similar to what government is in regular socialism.

Americans often misunderstand fascism because it used the term corporatism, but what Mussolini called corporations have nothing to do with what Americans call corporations. Fascism was another form of socialism in the sense that it implied state control of the economy, but unlike traditional socialists it did not promote class struggle.

Comment: Re:From TFA (Score 1) 248

by vegetasaiyajin (#34525710) Attached to: Venezuelan Gov't Seeks Internet Content Bill

When you read the details on what is proposed by the Venezuelan government, it doesn't sound that unreasonable.
Makes you wonder why it's being spun as totalitarian and evil.

Can you elaborate on what you consider reasonable about the people being to use a single government-supervised Internet access point, where the only content that can be accessed is what is approved by the government and where you can be sent to prison for posting things that offend the government?

The bill also proposes allowing the government to restrict access to websites if they are found to be distributing messages or information that incite violence against the president. Chavez frequently accuses the opposition of plotting to kill him."

You find this reasonable?

Comment: Re:Socialism never disappoints (Score 1) 248

by vegetasaiyajin (#34525672) Attached to: Venezuelan Gov't Seeks Internet Content Bill

Norway is not a socialist country. Private property of means of production is strongly protected.
The Venezuelan government, on the other hand, is seeking to abolish such private property through nationalizations, confiscations and even political persecution. They are pretty advanced.

Comment: Re:Socialism never disappoints (Score 1) 248

by vegetasaiyajin (#34525652) Attached to: Venezuelan Gov't Seeks Internet Content Bill

Scandinavian countries are largely capitalist welfare states. Most means of production are in private hands, although governments usually have partial or total ownership of some industries, so you can call them mixed economies, but almost every country in the world is a mixed economy.
Under Chavez, Venezuela can be considered a socialist country as most means of productions are owned by the government. This trend was not started by Chavez, but by previous socialist parties that took control of the country in 1958 and nationalized many industries. Chavez just expanded the already extensive government ownership of means of production.

Open Source

Open Source Developer Knighted 101

Posted by samzenpus
from the knights-who-say-free dept.
unixfan writes "Georg Greve, developer of Open Document Format and active FOSS developer, has received a knighthood in Germany for his work. From the article: 'Some weeks ago I received news that the embassy in Berne had unsuccessfully been trying to contact me under FSFE's old office address in Zurich. This was a bit odd and unexpected. So you can probably understand my surprise to be told by the embassy upon contacting them that on 18 December 2009 I had been awarded the Cross of Merit on ribbon (Verdienstkreuz am Bande) by the Federal Republic of Germany. As you might expect, my first reaction was one of disbelief. I was, in fact, rather shaken. You could also say shocked. Quick Wikipedia research revealed this to be part of the orders of knighthood, making this a Knight's Cross.'"

Comment: Re:America is socialist (Score 1) 413

by vegetasaiyajin (#31448260) Attached to: Bill Gates No Longer World's Richest Man

Your remark doesn't follow from the parent's. It is clear practically by inspection that most Americans (most people in general) are not able to consistently understand what's best for them.€

By inspection? That's anecdotical. Give scientific evidence that this is the case.

If most of us did know what was best for us most of the time and consistently acted upon it intelligently, this would be a vastly different world.

What's best for you? Do you know? Do you think it is possible to know? Do you think everyone judges things with the same scale when deciding what is best for them?
And give us something less shallow than "by inspection"

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