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Comment: Re: Ummmm.... (Score 1) 319

by valmont (#49085393) Attached to: Java Vs. Node.js: Epic Battle For Dev Mindshare
Agreed. What gets forgotten in the debate is that Java is a reference implementation of all true OOP constructs: Interface Abstract Class Class Which when applied judiciously, allow u to do things like inversion of control, dependency injection and test driven development in a strongly-typed environment, and this strongly-typed nature, when properly embraced, makes it easier to write software which you can refactor as often as you desire with orders of magnitude less risk than with "fsck-all-typed" languages like ruby or JavaScript. So, if your application does little more than pushing data into and reading data from some storage engine, then okay, JavaScript is an okay choice. If your application is growing into having significant business logic, then JavaScript will turn into thousands of lines of spaghetti untraceable closure hell , whereby each refactoring attempt will almost certainly have catastrophic consequences in production down some obscure execution path in some anonymous callback function you couldn't be bothered unit testing because how the fsck do you write a unit test against that anonymous function? There's not a concept of a Class in JavaScript. Sure you can mimmick inheritance patterns with prototypes with albeit some unintended consequences (hasOwnProperry) and encapsulated properties by having your closures reference variables from their enclosing context etc, but those techniques are what i call "expressively contrived" Strongly-typed OOP languages have very-well established tried and true patterns for writing test-driven code Ruby while not strongly typed, at least has a concept of Class/methods/inheritance/polymorphism . Problem with Ruby is as i am writing things TDD in it, the first half of my tests are there to ensure that my methods behave correctly when i pass them arguments of the wrong types, and my methods are littered with lines of code ensuring that my arguments have the expected properties. Totally retarded. And Ruby doesn't know anything about an Interface, but that's okay because it's got "fsck-all-typing" so it's not like you would even try to enforce modicums of contracts. Anyway, as applications grow in complexity, building things TDD in strongly-typed OOP languages leads to more fun, and frequent refactoring which makes ur code more stable instead of more brittle. I've written a crap ton of JS code. Java code too. And PHP. And a minimal amount of Ruby: I've appreciated their strengths. And drawbacks. Feel free to learn the same thing I have the hard way: this panacea mentality to stacks is just one big circle jerk. If you think JS, in its current form, is the only true way to build web applications, then by all means, keep that head firmly planted in the sand while the rest of the World out innovates you with a blend of languages and platforms best-suited for their use-cases.
Google

+ - Google Rewrites Web pages For Speed->

Submitted by
CWmike
CWmike writes "Google has developed a hosted service that analyzes Web pages, rewrites their code to make them perform better, and serves them up from Google servers. To use the Page Speed Service, Web publishers must sign up and point their site's DNS entry to Google. The service grabs the site's content, optimizes it for speed and delivers the pages to end users. Visitors will continue to access a site in the same way as before but could see speed enhancements of 25% to 60%, according to Google."
Link to Original Source
Technology (Apple)

+ - Live Chat during MWSF Keynote 9am P.T.->

Submitted by
Chris
Chris writes "Last year, a wild party of rabid Apple fans, enthusiasts and curious joined webChattr's inaugural launch during the 2008 MWSF Steve Jobs Keynote. Leading up to 9am, both "stevenote" and "stevenotechat" rooms had up to 200 simultaneous chattrs.

In the past year, webChattr's grown as a favored chat destination and chat platform by many enthusiastic iPhone, iPod Touch and Web users, as well as site owners.

This year will be Apple's last MacWorld appearance and the keynote address will be delivered by Phil Schiller. webChattr will once again be hosting a live chat at 9am Pacific Time during the 2009 MacWorld San Francisco Keynote Address.

Those 2 chat rooms will be accessible in an interface optimized for iPhone (even slow EDGE/3G connectivity) and iPod Touch users, as well as all desktop Web Browsers. Web Site operators will also be able to include a custom-sized chat widget of the event on any web page, available thru Widgetbox."

Link to Original Source
Communications

+ - iPhone: Apple's VoIP End-Game->

Submitted by
Chris Holland
Chris Holland writes "AT&T's executives are smitten with the iPhone. They might one day abhor or embrace a tremendous opportunity presenting itself to Apple, in the form of a real-time communications infrastructure built on top of open protocols. While this article doesn't quite tackle potential power struggles between AT&T and Apple, it paints a possible convergence of events that would enable us to make free, higher-quality calls over WiFi/IP without even having to "think about it", by simply picking a Person from the Address Book, and hitting "call" ... The same way we'd make a Normal Phone Call."
Link to Original Source

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