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Submission + - US backs loans for first nuke plant in 30yrs ( 1

SpuriousLogic writes: President Barack Obama has announced more than $8bn (£5bn) of federal loan guarantees to help build the first US nuclear power stations for 30 years.
Two new plants are to be constructed in the state of Georgia by US electricity firm Southern Company.
President Obama said the plants would be "safe and clean" and were needed to meet the country's future energy needs.
There have been no new nuclear power plants built in the US since the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island.


Australian Farmers Told To Dynamite Rabbits Screenshot-sm 12

The South Australian Environment Department has told farmers that they should use poison gas or even explosives to deal with the out-of-control rabbit population. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Invasive Animals chief Professor Tony Peacock, owner of the largest business card ever, says that blowing up rabbits isn't as inhuman as people might think, and has been ranked by the RSPCA as one of the best ways to destroy warrens.

Submission + - 1 kW fuel cell runs on most fuels (

An anonymous reader writes: The objective of Cleveland-based Technology Management Incorporated, Inc.'s 1 kW modular fuel cell has been to make the technology more accessible to the little guy and in low density markets, which puts them in rural and remote areas of the world. Hence they intentionally engineered their cells to run on a wide range of indigenous fuels. Their module can run on fuels including methane, syngas, propane, ethanol, digester biogas, JP-8 kerosene, diesel, ammonia, vegetable oils, used cooking oil, corn oil, soybean oil, biodiesel and jatropha — without modification of the system from one fuel to the next. Hence, TMI plans to market this distributed energy solution to the developing world where they don't have power, enabling them to grow their own. Each 1 kW system is small enough and light enough to be handled by one person.

Submission + - China: Twitter, Flickr, Hotmail, Others Blocked (

An anonymous reader writes: Two days ahead of the Tiananmen Square 'incident' several high profile Internet sites have been blocked in mainland China, these include,,, and While Internet blocks in mainland China, blocking such high profile sites is unusual. In addition, blog reports suggest even state-owned television broadcasts are suffering multiple instances of muting lasting several seconds (again, not unusual for some foreign stations broadcast over cable, but unusual for local state-owned media) suggesting state security, online or through other technology, has tightened significantly, perhaps in anticipation or discovery of protest plans.

Submission + - Nanomaker's Toolkit (

gabrlknght writes: "Because nanoparticles are small, a large proportion of their atoms are near the particle's surface. Having fewer neighbors, those relatively unconfined atoms can link in unusual ways, giving materials made of nanoparticles novel properties. But the same characteristic that makes nanostructures useful--size--also makes working with them no small task. Engineering on the nanoscale is like building a ship in a bottle while wearing mittens. It would be far cheaper and easier, researchers agree, if nanoparticles could just arrange themselves into nanomaterials --like dropping the pieces of the ship into the bottle and then sitting back to watch the ship build itself. What scientists are working on now is finding the right chemistry — creating just the right conditions so that natural properties such as charge or magnetism direct the pieces of the ship to come together just so, with the mast above the deck and never below or to the side. This idea, called self-assembly, isn't exactly new. Examples range from the simple separation of oil and vinegar in a bottle of salad dressing to the complex movements of proteins and enzymes — themselves nanosized — reacting in living cells. Scientists have long been inspired by these naturally self-assembling systems. But designing self-assembling systems in the lab, with nanoparticles, presents its own scale of difficulty. And making self-assembled nanomaterials grow large enough to actually be useful is even more challenging."

Submission + - iRobot Announces Paperback Sized Military Robot (

knothead99 writes: Introducing the iRobot Ember.

"iRobot has built over 2,000 machines for the military. Most of 'em are 50 pounds plus, and more than three feet long. But, lately, the company has been working on an itty-bitty version of its Packbot reconnaissance machine — one that weighs less than a pound, and is about the size of a paperback book."

Video included of the robot in action.


Submission + - Virus Hits FBI and US Marshals (

Drivintin writes: "Looks like CNET has a story of the FBI, and US Marshals Service being hit with an unknown virus. The FBI and the U.S. Marshals Service were forced to shut down parts of their computer networks after a mystery virus struck the law-enforcement agencies Thursday, according to an Associated Press report. A spokesperson for the U.S. Marshals Service confirmed that it had disconnected from Justice Department computers as a precaution after being hit with the virus, while an FBI spokesperson would only say that it was experiencing similar issues."

Submission + - FCC's Warrantless Household Searches Alarm Experts

mikesd81 writes: " reports that you may not know it, but if you have a wireless router, a cordless phone, remote car-door opener, baby monitor or cellphone in your house, the FCC claims the right to enter your home without a warrant at any time of the day or night in order to inspect it. FCC spokesman David Fiske says "Anything using RF energy — we have the right to inspect it to make sure it is not causing interference." The FCC claims it derives its warrantless search power from the Communications Act of 1934, though the constitutionality of the claim has gone untested in the courts. "It is a major stretch beyond case law to assert that authority with respect to a private home, which is at the heart of the Fourth Amendment's protection against unreasonable search and seizure," says Electronic Frontier Foundation lawyer Lee Tien. "When it is a private home and when you are talking about an over-powered Wi-Fi antenna — the idea they could just go in is honestly quite bizarre.""

Submission + - Sunlight Labs offers $25,000 for apps (

Andurin writes: "With the launch of, Sunlight Labs is offering $25,000 in prize money for developers who create apps that use newly-released federal government data. is paving the way for citizens to become more engaged with their government, by providing for the first-time a clearinghouse of federal data in developer-friendly formats. The Apps for America 2 contest aims to find the best applications that rely on, whether it be a client application, an iPhone app, or data visualization. Also, the first, second and third prize winners will receive airfare and hotel placement for a trip to Washington DC. While in Washington, DC, they'll attend an awards ceremony at the Gov2.0 Summit by O'Reilly Media and TechWeb."

Submission + - U.S Federal Government Launches (

Elastic Vapor writes: "I'm happy to announce that the U.S. Federal Government earlier today launched the new Data.Gov website. The primary goal of Data.Gov is to improve access to Federal data and expand creative use of those data beyond the walls of government by encouraging innovative ideas (e.g., web applications). strives to make government more transparent and is committed to creating an unprecedented level of openness in Government. The openness derived from will strengthen the Nation's democracy and promote efficiency and effectiveness in Government."
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - FOX commits changes to wikipedia

HNS-I writes: geeksaresexy[dot]net Has a story about wikiality in action. After O'Reilly announced that the FOX employees have been making chenges to articles on wikipedia a guy sought out the IP address belonging with the edits and started inspecting other articles on edits by the same address. The most obvious to start with were of course the ones about conservatism, democrats and Keith Olbermann.

RTFA to see the changes that were made
PS. I advice you to edit this yourselves

One picture is worth 128K words.