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Submission + - City of Boston pays $170,000 to settle landmark case involving man arrested for ( 1

Ian Lamont writes: "The City of Boston has reached a $170,000 settlement with Simon Glik who was arrested by Boston Police in 2007 after using his mobile phone to record police arresting another man on Boston Common. Police claimed that Glik had violated state wiretapping laws, but later dropped the charges and admitted the officers were wrong to arrest him. Glik had brought a lawsuit against the city (aided by the ACLU) because he claimed his civil rights were violated. According to today's ACLU statement:

As part of the settlement, Glik agreed to withdraw his appeal to the Community Ombudsman Oversight Panel. He had complained about the Internal Affairs Division's investigation of his complaint and the way they treated him. IAD officers made fun of Glik for filing the complaint, telling him his only remedy was filing a civil lawsuit. After the City spent years in court defending the officers' arrest of Glik as constitutional and reasonable, IAD reversed course after the First Circuit ruling and disciplined two of the officers for using "unreasonable judgment" in arresting Glik.



Submission + - Iowa Criminalizes Reporters on Factory Farms 1

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Cody Carlson writes in the Atlantic that Iowa recently passed HF 589, better known as the "Ag Gag" law, that criminalizes investigative journalists and animal protection advocates who take entry-level jobs at factory farms in order to document the rampant food safety and animal welfare abuses within. The original version of the law would have made it a crime to take, possess, or share pictures of factory farms that were taken without the owner's consent, but the Iowa Attorney General rejected this measure out of First Amendment concerns. As amended, the law achieves the same result by making it a crime to give a false statement on an "agricultural production" job application (PDF). As a Humane Society of the United States investigator, Carlson worked undercover at four Iowa egg farms in the winter of 2010 and witnessed disturbing trends of extreme animal cruelty and dangerously unsanitary conditions. "Millions of haggard, featherless hens languished in crowded, microwave-sized wire cages. Unable to even spread their wings, many were forced to pile atop their dead and rotting cage mates as they laid their eggs." The Ag Gag laws also protect the slaughterhouses that regularly send sick and dying animals into our food supply, and would prevent some of the biggest food safety recalls in US. history. "In short, the Ag Gag laws muzzle the few people that are telling the truth about our food," writes Carlson. "Now, the foxes are truly guarding the henhouse.""

Submission + - Photographing police: Deletion is not forever (

Geoffrey.landis writes: "The courts have now ruled that the public has the right to videotape the police in the performance of their duties. Of course, that doesn't stop the police from harrassing people who do so, even journalists, not to mention confiscating their cameras.
As it turns out, though, they're not always very knowledgable about how deletion works.
I would say that erasing, or attempting to erase, a video of police arresting somebody illegally (How can a journalist be charged with "resisting arrest" when he was not being arrested for anything other than resisting arrest?) is a clear case of destruction of evidence by the officers. Destroying evidence is obstruction of justice. That's illegal. Why haven't these police officers been arrested?"


Submission + - FBI Turns Off Thousands of GPS Devices After Supreme Court Ruling (

suraj.sun writes: The Supreme Court’s recent ruling overturning the warrantless use of GPS tracking devices has caused a “sea change” inside the U.S. Justice Department, according to FBI General Counsel Andrew Weissmann ( ).

Mr. Weissmann, speaking at a University of San Francisco conference called “Big Brother in the 21st Century” on Friday, said that the court ruling prompted the FBI to turn off about 3,000 GPS tracking devices that were in use.

These devices were often stuck underneath cars to track the movements of the car owners. In U.S. v. Jones, the Supreme Court ruled that using a device to track a car owner without a search warrant violated the law. After the ruling, the FBI had a problem collecting the devices that it had turned off, Mr. Weissmann said. In some cases, he said, the FBI sought court orders to obtain permission to turn the devices on briefly – only in order to locate and retrieve them.


Submission + - Gary Friedrich, created Ghostrider, now he has to pay Disney for doing that (

blackest_k writes: Basically, Friedrich created the character of Ghost Rider for Marvel in the '70s. It's not a matter of dispute, it's just a fact. Marvel owns the rights to the character and has ever since Friedrich signed his creation over to them three decades ago. However, before the first Ghost Rider film was released, Friedrich sued all involved under the belief that while Marvel undoubtedly owned the comic rights, he owned the film rights and should be involved both creatively and financially. He lost that lawsuit. That's not where things ended, though.

Friedrich has since made no further claims to the ownership of the character, he has, however, attempted to rightfully claim authorship of him in his private life. He's attended comics conventions and the likes as a paid guest, using his status as the creator of an iconic comic (and now film) character as his main source of income now that he's 68 years old. However, Marvel is still demanding in a court of law that Friedrich pay them the approximately $17,000 he's earned in retirement by acknowledging he's the creator of Ghost Rider.

Yes, you read that correctly. Marvel, a company that was recently purchased by Disney for $4 billion, is demanding that the person who created one of its most iconic and enduring characters — a person who is now 68 years old and is more or less broke after years of legal struggle — pay them his remaining $17,000 for having the gall to make money off of his history with the character.

The guy is 68 now and to pursue him for even being able to say 'yes I did that' stinks to high heaven
If any one wants to donate to help gary they can do so at this link


Submission + - LaCie Hard Disk MAX has major RAID 1 design flaw (

An anonymous reader writes: LaCie is shipping its Hard Disk MAX with a major design flaw if you decide to use it in RAID 1 configuration. It turns out if one of the discs fails, the MAX stops working completely. So you can't recover the data from the remaining good disc without opening up the casing. But by doing that you hit another problem: opening the MAX voids your warranty. LaCie's solution? Pay them $400 to recover the data with the d2 Recovery service. Kind of defeats the point of having RAID as a feature of the drive doesn't it?

Submission + - Senate approves indefinite detention and torture of Americans (

Artem Tashkinov writes: The terrifying legislation that allows for Americans to be arrested, detained indefinitely, tortured and interrogated — without charge or trial — passed through the Senate on Thursday with an overwhelming support from 93 percent of lawmakers. Only seven members of the US Senate voted against the National Defense Authorization Act on Thursday, despite urging from the ACLU and concerned citizens across the country that the affects of the legislation would be detrimental to the civil rights and liberties of everyone in America. Under the bill, Americans can be held by the US military for terrorism-related charges and detained without trial indefinitely.
Your Rights Online

Submission + - Goodbye SOPA/PIPA, hello OPEN (

slugmass writes: "The quick withdrawal of SOPA/PIPA gave opponents a good feeling, designed to lull them back into apathy. Naturally a replacement had already been written and is now submitted by Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA)."
Your Rights Online

Submission + - US Supreme Court rules against Warantless GPS Trac

necro81 writes: In a rare 9-0 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled (PDF) in United States v. Jones that law enforcement needed to obtain a search warrant before installing a GPS tracker on a suspect's car, then monitoring the car's movements. The Court split 5-4, however, on the scope of the ruling, and ruled largely on the fact that they installed the tracker on the defendant's private property (a car), sidestepping much larger questions about pervasive police tracking using GPS, cameras, and cellphones.
United States

Submission + - Steve Jobs Told Obama Made-in-the-USA Days Over 9

theodp writes: At his Last Supper with Steve Jobs, reports the NY Times, President Obama had a question for Jobs: What would it take to make iPhones in the United States? 'Those jobs aren't coming back,' Jobs replied. The president's question touched upon a central conviction at Apple: It isn't just that workers are cheaper abroad; Apple execs believe the vast scale of overseas factories as well as the flexibility, diligence and industrial skills of foreign workers have so outpaced their American counterparts that Made in the U.S.A.' is no longer a viable option for most Apple products. 'The speed and flexibility is breathtaking,' a former Apple exec gushed, describing how 8,000 workers were once roused from company dormitories at midnight to address a last-minute Apple design change, given a biscuit and a cup of tea, guided to a workstation and within half an hour started a 12-hour shift fitting glass screens into beveled frames. 'There's no American plant that can match that.' What's vexed Obama as well as economists and policy makers is that Apple — and many of its hi-tech peers — are not nearly as avid in creating American jobs as other famous companies were in their heydays. 'We don't have an obligation to solve America's problems,' a current Apple exec is quoted as saying. 'Our only obligation is making the best product possible.'

Submission + - U.S. nuclear renaissance unlikely after Fukushima (

mdsolar writes: ""A new study released Wednesday said that the regulatory fallout from the Fukushima power plant disaster in Japan in March will short-circuit the U.S. nuclear renaissance of new power plant construction."

Report is here:"


Submission + - Adblock No Longer Filtering All Ads ( 2

SharkLaser writes: Adblock developers have made a radical change to their addon. From the newest version forward, Adblock will only filter the most irritating advertisements. This includes advertisement with sounds, flashy pictures or animations. This means, for example, that Adblock is no longer filtering Google's text ads and any other advertisements that isn't irritating to most users. The developers are saying that this change should push website owners to change to less irritating ads, for example Google's AdSense.

Submission + - Google goes IPv6 for internal network (

coondoggie writes: "In a project that has taken longer than company engineers anticipated, Google is rolling out IPv6 across its entire internal employee network.

Google network engineer Irena Nikolova discussed the company-wide implementation and shared some lessons that other organizations might benefit from as they migrate their own networks to the next generation Internet Protocol."


Submission + - Apple Loses Patent Case in Germany, iPhone/iPad sa (

quantr writes: ""Earlier this morning, the Mannheim Regional Court in Germany ruled that Apple did infringe on GPRS patents belonging to smartphone rival Motorola, which could see an injunction placed on iPhones and iPads.
Florian Mueller of FOSSpatents revealed the outcome between the two mobile giants, highlighting that sales of the iPhone, iPhone 3G, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPad 3G and iPad2 3G may be impacted in Germany unless Apple is able to secure a stay until an appeal can be heard.""

Your Rights Online

Submission + - Copyright isn't working, says Europe's digital chi (

superglaze writes: Against the backdrop of governments and courts around the world ordering ISPs to block file-sharing sites, European commissioner Neelie Kroes has said people have started to see copyright as "a tool to punish and withhold, not a tool to recognise and reward". "Citizens increasingly hear the word copyright and hate what is behind it," the EU's digital chief said, adding that the copyright system also wasn't rewarding the vast majority of artists.

Neutrinos have bad breadth.