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Submission + - Your neck bone's connected to your cellphone (

stevedcc writes: "New Scientist are running an article about using sound waves to communicate between different devices attached to a user's body, avoiding the potential interception issues of wireless signals. From the article:

They want to use the human skeleton to transmit commands reliably and securely to wearable gadgets and medical implants. Their research, funded by Microsoft and Texas Instruments, could also lead to new ways for people with disabilities to control devices such as computers and PDAs.


Submission + - Plants 'recognize' their siblings (

An anonymous reader writes: Biologists have discovered that just like humans, plants can also recognize their relatives. Researchers at McMaster University have found that plants get fiercely competitive when forced to share their pot with strangers of the same species, but they're accommodating when potted with their siblings.
PC Games (Games)

Submission + - Mutliplatform OpenSource Sub-Sim released (

An anonymous reader writes: Danger from the Deep, an Open Source World War II German uboat simulation, striving for technical and historical accuracy, is now in its 0.3 incarnation. This latest version features a considerable amount of new features as well as tons of bug fixes. For those not familiarized with it, basically it's a "Battle of the Atlantic" simulation, focused in tactical and strategic component of uboat warfare. It tries to be the most historically and technically correct as possible, which on occasions might make the typical game a bit complex, due to complexity of the uboat systems being simulated. This however, will be minimized, once collaborative (network) game-play is implemented.

  Amongst the new features, Dangerdeep now appears in full OpenGL2.0/GLSL1.1 goodness, now uses VBOs and FBOs, and it's now multi-threaded. Add to that the new functionality, such as a "captain's cabin", a new ship's log, new models, improved ocean render, and tons of bug fixes. At the moment, it's supported on x86-32/64 Linux, Windows, and there are intel OSX and ppc64 OSX packages under-way. There were reports of Danger from the Deep working on Sparc64 Linux, as well as x86-32/64, IA64 and Sparc64 FreeBSD (5.x though).

Notice that you do need 3d hardware acceleration, with OpenGL 1.5 being the minimum required, and OpenGL2.0 being the recommended for all the eye candy, but you can find more informations on this release, and Danger from the Deep in general, at the project web page,


Submission + - The 40 Fastest-Growing Software Companies (

morningside writes: The biggest software makers continue to rely on acquisitions for growth, according to this article (with rankings) in Baseline. "While the software industry has matured, M&A is still letting stalwarts like Oracle, Adobe and Symantec post top-line growth in excess of 20%. Here's our list of the company's with the best year-over-year revenue rise."

"Survey says..." -- Richard Dawson, weenie, on "Family Feud"