Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Submission + - Google CEO says "nothing seriously wrong" (yahoo.com)

Pigskin-Referee writes: Google Inc Chief Executive Larry Page has reassured employees about his health, but the company on Friday shed little additional light on an unspecified condition affecting his voice that will sideline him from two high-profile events in the coming weeks.

Page told employees in an email on Thursday that there was "nothing seriously wrong with me," according to a source who had seen an internal staff memo.

The 39-year-old Google co-founder sat out his company's annual shareholders' meeting on Thursday because he had "lost his voice," according to Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt, who informed attendees of the news at the start of the event.


Submission + - Blurry vision may stop us living in space (geek.com) 2

An anonymous reader writes: There's a number of challenges we need to overcome before years long space travel, or even living in space become a reality. One I didn't expect was dealing with increasingly poor vision, but it may turn out to be a major obstacle.

Observing astronauts that spend weeks and months aboard ISS has found their vision becomes increasingly blurred. This is due to the optic nerve swelling, folds appearing in the choroid, and the globe of the eye flattening. The effects after 6 months are blurred vision for near sight, to the point where some astronauts need glasses to aid reading and writing.

It seems silly that even if we get the tech right to allow us to live in space, we might not be able to do so for fear of losing our eyesight.


Submission + - New Horizons: One Billion Miles From Pluto (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: "On Feb. 10, NASA's Pluto-bound New Horizons probe entered the homestretch of its mission. When you are sprinting across the solar system, "homestretch" is the final 1 billion miles of your journey. That sounds like quite a long stretch! But the half-ton spacecraft has already logged 2 billion miles since its launch in early 2006. That’s twice the distance between Earth and Saturn. Though the icy dwarf planet is still three years away from its close encounter, mission scientists call this the Late Cruise phase of the flight."

We're here to give you a computer, not a religion. - attributed to Bob Pariseau, at the introduction of the Amiga