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Submission + - Africa 'leapfrogs' to wider internet access->

umarkalim writes: In an interview to Aljazeera, Les Cottrell at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory explains how Africa will actually 'leapfrog' the need to install hard-wired cables. He highlights that it is often overlooked that the continent is huge and that the countries are diverse. He says that "the cost of the infrastructure is quite high, especially if you have to connect every home with copper cables and fibre-optic cables ... I think in many cases Africa will actually 'leapfrog' the need to install hard-wired cables everywhere, and will be able to use different techniques such as the BRCK modem, the low-earth orbiting satellites or the 3G solutions to get connectivity to where they need."
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Politics

Submission + - Living Under Drones->

umarkalim writes: In the United States, the dominant narrative about the use of drones in Pakistan is of a surgically precise and effective tool that makes the US safer by enabling “targeted killing” of terrorists, with minimal downsides or collateral impacts. This narrative is false. Following nine months of intensive research—including two investigations in Pakistan, more than 130 interviews with victims, witnesses, and experts, and review of thousands of pages of documentation and media reporting—this report presents evidence of the damaging and counterproductive effects of current US drone strike policies. ... This report is the result of nine months of research by the International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic of Stanford Law School (Stanford Clinic) and the Global Justice Clinic at New York University School of Law (NYU Clinic).
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Politics

Submission + - Can Pakistan survive without US aid?->

umarkalim writes: In a blog post at dawn.com Murtaza Haider writes

The British newspaper Guardian maintains an active database documenting six decades of American aid to Pakistan. The data is compiled by Wren Elhai of the Center for Global Development in Washington, DC. The database reveals that since 1948 the US assistance to Pakistan has largely been for civilian purposes. Of the $61.7 billion in total assistance (in constant 2009 dollars) provided to Pakistan between 1948 and 2010, $40.4 billion were provided for economic assistance and $21.3 billion in military assistance. The economic assistance to Pakistan peaked in the early 60s when in excess of $2 billion annually were provided to Pakistan.


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Space

Submission + - Biggest Maps of Dark Matter to Date->

umarkalim writes: Fermilab Press Release:

Two teams of physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermilab and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have independently made the largest direct measurements of the invisible scaffolding of the universe, building maps of dark matter using new methods that, in turn, will remove key hurdles for understanding dark energy with ground-based telescopes.


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Space

Submission + - Fermilab, Berkeley Lab Build Biggest Maps of Dark ->

umarkalim writes: Two teams of physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermilab and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have independently made the largest direct measurements of the invisible scaffolding of the universe, building maps of dark matter using new methods that, in turn, will remove key hurdles for understanding dark energy with ground-based telescopes.
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Science

Submission + - Viewing the Ultra-fast->

umarkalim writes: Staff Scientist Apurva Mehta says, "For 40 years at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), we have been taking very high-resolution photographs-photographs of atoms in molecules and crystals and of electronic structures. But now we want to make movies." He and his colleagues are developing a new "pump-probe" facility that promises to expand SSRL's capabilities and complement those of SLAC's X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source.
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The Internet

Submission + - Japanese Internet survives the earthquake-> 1 1

umarkalim writes: Despite the devastating earthquake, Internet connectivity to Japan was maintained. The PingER project which monitors interregional connectivity in terms of Latencies, Losses, Throughput and Reachability metrics allowed researchers to conclude that Internet connectivity to Japan was maintained. Round Trip Times (RTT) to some hosts increased significantly as seen from SLAC, USA. However as seen from RIKEN in Japan they did not increase. It appears the increase in RTT depends on the route from the monitoring host to Japan. This suggests a possible cable disruption. For more on cables see here.
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Network

Submission + - Internet performance seen by PingER and Mid-East i->

umarkalim writes: "February 2011 saw much instability in North African and Middle Eastern countries including Tunisia, Egypt, Algeria, Bahrain, Libya, and Morocco. In some of these countries such as Egypt and Libya there were overt efforts to limit Internet access. It is interesting to see the consequent impact of Internet performance to these countries."
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The Internet

Submission + - Egypt pulls the plug on their internet->

An anonymous reader writes: In an historic move, the Egyptian government decided to unplug the country from the Internet. According to internet monitoring firm Renesys, shortly before 2300 GMT on 27 January virtually all routes to Egyptian networks were simultaneously withdrawn from the Internet’s global routing table. This led to all the requests to websites and resources hosted in Egypt to timeout. However the services have now been restored.
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Networking

Submission + - East Africa gets high speed Internet access->

umarkalim writes: "With the 2010 Soccer World Cup fast approaching the Seacom undersea fibre optic cable, plugging East Africa into high speed Internet, went live on Thursday July 23, 2009 — as reported by the BBC and CNN. Such a cable should dramatically reduce the cost of bandwidth measured in $/Mbps, reduce the Round Trip Times (RTT) from >~ 480 ms for a geostationary satellite, down to 200-350ms by using shorter distance terrestrial routes, and by increasing the capacity reduce the losses and jitter. In this case study we look at the current state of Internet access for Africa as measured by the PingER project and also at the effect of the new submarine cable connections on the RTTs to countries of Africa as seen from the SLAC National Accelerator Center near San Francisco. The main effects seen so far are on the RTTs for selected sites that have converted to using the terrestrial links. As the new routes stabilize and more and more customers, e.g academia and commercial organizations, subscribe to the service, we can expect to also see lower losses and jitter and higher through-puts together with a wider impact on deployment."
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Communications

Submission + - East Africa gets high speed Internet access->

umarkalim writes: "With the 2010 Soccer World Cup fast approaching the Seacom undersea fibre optic cable, plugging East Africa into high speed Internet, went live on Thursday July 23, 2009 — as reported by the BBC and CNN. Such a cable should dramatically reduce the cost of bandwidth measured in $/Mbps, reduce the Round Trip Times (RTT) from >~ 480 ms for a geostationary satellite, down to 200-350ms by using shorter distance terrestrial routes, and by increasing the capacity reduce the losses and jitter. In this case study we look at the current state of Internet access for Africa as measured by the PingER project and also at the effect of the new submarine cable connections on the RTTs to countries of Africa as seen from the SLAC National Accelerator Center near San Francisco. The main effects seen so far are on the RTTs for selected sites that have converted to using the terrestrial links. As the new routes stabilize and more and more customers, e.g academia and commercial organizations, subscribe to the service, we can expect to also see lower losses and jitter and higher through-puts together with a wider impact on deployment."
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