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Comment: Spelling mistakes as a "human" feature (Score 1) 630

by ulash (#25311037) Attached to: New Contestants On the Turing Test

And I find it kinda cute that they try to look more "human" by introducing one off typos from the keyboard (like switching the letter "o" with the letter "p") randomly. While I think this could be an interesting little feature (albeit still gimmicky may be) in a much better system at the current level of performance it only comes across as a very silly and transparent attempt.

The Internet

Handling Flash Crowds From Your Garage 74

Posted by kdawson
from the to-scale-or-not-to-scale dept.
slashdotmsiriv writes "This paper from Microsoft Research describes the issues and tradeoffs a typical garage innovator encounters when building low-cost, scalable Internet services. The paper is a more formal analysis of the problems encountered and solutions employed a few months back when Animoto, with its new Facebook app, had to scale by a factor of 10 in 3 days. In addition, the article offers an overview of the current state of utility computing (S3, EC2, etc.) and of the most common strategies for building scalable Internet services."
The Courts

Hans Reiser Leads Police To Nina's Body 1523

Posted by kdawson
from the removing-all-doubt dept.
jlmcgraw was the first to alert us that Hans Reiser has led police to the location in the Oakland Hills where he buried the body of his wife Nina. (We discussed the rumor that he would do so last month.) SFGate.com reports that remains were recovered but have not yet been identified. Reiser is to be sentenced on Wednesday. CBS5 claims that Reiser made a deal for a reduced sentence, to 15 years, in exchange for revealing the body.
Math

Rubik's Cube Algorithm Cut Again, Down to 23 Moves 202

Posted by timothy
from the at-this-rate-one-will-soon-be-enough dept.
Bryan writes "The number of moves necessary to solve an arbitrary Rubik's cube configuration has been cut down to 23 moves, according to an update on Tomas Rokicki's homepage (and here). As reported in March, Rokicki developed a very efficient strategy for studying cube solvability, which he used it to show that 25 moves are sufficient to solve any (solvable) Rubik's cube. Since then, he's upgraded from 8GB of memory and a Q6600 CPU, to the supercomputers at Sony Pictures Imageworks (his latest result was produced during idle-time between productions). Combined with some of Rokicki's earlier work, this new result implies that for any arbitrary cube configuration, a solution exists in either 21, 22, or 23 moves. This is in agreement with informal group-theoretic arguments (see Hofstadter 1996, ch. 14) suggesting that the necessary and sufficient number of moves should be in the low 20s. From the producers of Spiderman 3 and Surf's Up, we bring you: 2 steps closer to God's Algorithm!"
Security

Sneaky Blackmailing Virus That Encrypts Data 409

Posted by timothy
from the ouch-and-double-ouch dept.
BaCa writes "Kaspersky Lab found a new variant of Gpcode which encrypts files with various extensions using an RSA encryption algorithm with a 1024-bit key. After Gpcode.ak encrypts files on the victim machine, it changes the extension of these files to ._CRYPT and places a text file named !_READ_ME_!.txt in the same folder. In the text file the criminal tells the victims that the file has been encrypted and offers to sell them a decryptor. Is this a look into the future where the majority of malware will function based on extortion?"
The Internet

How To Frame a Printer For Copyright Infringement 325

Posted by timothy
from the point-the-finger-point-it-well dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Have you ever wondered what it takes to get 'caught' for copyright infringement on the Internet? Surprisingly, actual infringement is not required. The New York Times reports that researchers from the computer science department at the University of Washington have just released a study that examines how enforcement agencies monitor P2P networks and what it takes to receive a complaint today. Without downloading or sharing a single file, their study attracted more than 400 copyright infringement complaints. Even more disturbing is their discovery that illegal P2P participation can be easily spoofed; the researchers managed to frame innocent desktop machines and even several university printers, all of which received bogus complaints."
Idle

Man Really Loves His Car 4

Posted by samzenpus
57-year-old Edward Smith wants everyone to know that he is not "sick" or mentally disturbed. He likes movies about cars, he writes poetry about them, he sings and talks to them and sometimes when the mood strikes, he makes love to them. Edward first had sex with a car at 15 and now estimates that over 1,000 cars can call him lover. He currently lives with his "girlfriend," a white Volkswagen Beetle named Vanilla. Could someone please give this man a hug and tell him everything is going to be ok?
The Internet

Singapore Firm Claims Patent Breach By Virtually All Websites 481

Posted by timothy
from the oh-that-makes-sense dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A Singapore firm, VueStar has threatened to sue websites that use pictures or graphics to link to another page, claiming it owns the patent for a technology used by millions around the world. The company is also planning to take on giants like Microsoft and Google. It is a battle that could, at least in theory, upend the Internet. The firm has been sending out invoices to Singapore companies since last week asking them to pay up."
Communications

How Japan's Biggest BBS Keeps Things Simple 265

Posted by timothy
from the by-ignoring-them-mostly dept.
zedsville points out an article at Wired proving that plenty of people (at least in Japan) are willing to brave BBS environments without all the fancy layers to screen out spam or online provocateurs: "It's a profile of Hiroyuki Nishimura, the man behind the Japanese site 2channel. Nishimura set up the simplistic BBS in 1999, when he was an exchange student in the USA. The site has no registration or web handles or moderating, no mechanisms to filter out flames and trollish behavior, and no mechanisms to help users find the most insightful comments and topics. But this ugly, lo-res site gets about 500 million pageviews a month. Nishimura doesn't police the contents of posts to his bulletin board, which has resulted in numerous libel claims. 'I used to show up in court,' he says. 'Then one day I overslept, and nothing happened. So I stopped going.' Nishimura has lost about 50 lawsuits and owes millions of dollars in penalties, which he has no intention of paying. 'If the verdict mandates deleting things, I'll do it,' he says. 'I just haven't complied with demands to pay money. Would a cell phone carrier feel responsible when somebody receives a threatening phone call?'"
Printer

Xerox Demos Self-Erasing, Eco-Friendly Paper 204

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the sitting-on-photocopiers-to-make-a-comeback dept.
Lucas123 writes "The same Xerox lab that brought us Ethernet, the GUI and the mouse has demonstrated paper that can be reused after printed text automatically deletes itself from its surface in a day. Instead of trashing or recycling after one use, a single piece of paper can be reused up to 100 times. 'The paper contains specially coded molecules that create a print after being exposed to ultraviolet light emitted from a thin bar in a printer. The ultraviolet bar itself is very small, so it can be used in mobile printers. The technology could also be useful for network printing.'"

An adequate bootstrap is a contradiction in terms.

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