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Submission + - Mathematical error in windows explorer

LiquidNitrogen writes: A few months back I have found and blogged about mathematical bug/refresh issue in Windows explorer in Windows Vista Ultimate 32 bit edition. It seems that at times Windows Vista may show the file size in negative and on refreshing the explorer view the file size keeps doubling. I have not yet tested the issue programmatically but these nagging issue may be rated as an annoyance to highly critical bug if there is a dependency on the file size directly or indirectly.

Submission + - NASA posts ancient FORTRAN code, buffs up data

chicomarxbro writes: "A Y2K error discovered by blogger Steve McIntyre in August forced NASA's climate chief James Hansen revise temperature data showing 1934 was actually the hottest year on record, not 1998 as previously announced. This spurred renewed calls for NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) to publicly release their historical FORTRAN code which powered the global temperature analyses. Still used today, the code has a lineage going back to the 70's. NASA finally agreed and published the code but not before making an unannounced change to the raw temperature data which bundled with the code. NASA's change to raw data collating methods. which hadn't been modified in over a decade, resulted in 1998 being put back in first place next to 1934. Some bloggers have called this stealthy revision of the raw data an "Enron like accounting game""

Submission + - Toy Industry Association lobbies to poison babies.

An anonymous reader writes: TIA (Toy Industry Association) seeks to poison babies with phthalates — already banned in EU. Thought you might shine some light on their mis-conduct. Here is their e-mail to TIA members. This is how poisons get foisted on the public. Read and get really mad. Subject: TIA LEGISLATIVE ALERT! February 20, 2007 Dear Member, The TOY INDUSTRY needs your help! As you may know, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors recently passed an ordinance banning toys and child care products containing certain phthalate plasticizers. Now we expect some California state legislators to attempt to take the ban on phthalate plasticizers statewide. Imagine the very thing that makes so many toys soft and safe for our children will be banned throughout the state of California. (Phthalate are banned in EU. Real problems found. Want your child sucking on these poisons? Contact the TIA for list of poisoners they most recommend.) It is easy to see the impact such a ban would have on the safety and economy of the toy industry. In response we are organizing the leaders in our industry to spread the word that phthalate plasticizers are scientifically safe and reduce potential injuries to children. (They will tell you how safe nicotene is too. Also, there is no such thing as global warming. That is why insurance industry won't write policies in Florida or Mississippi.) What do we need from you? We need you to join our effort to defeat this legislation. In the coming weeks and months we will ask you to contact your local legislator through phone calls, writing letters and in some cases meeting face to face. To bolster our efforts we will need industry representatives to join our media campaign by writing letters to the editor and conducting interviews with local and statewide media outlets countering the misinformation being disseminated by those advocating the legislation. Will you give a little of your time to help us defend our industry? (I am helping — I am exposing their misconduct to the light of day.) As mentioned, there are a number of ways to get involved. If you are willing to help please contact either Rob Herriott at 646-520-4843 or email or Joan Lawrence at 646-520-4844 or email (So I ask you — as concerned parents who might care about the NEGATIVE effects of phthalates on YOUR children — contact these clowns and give them hell. Also, ask them which toy manufacturers are pushing these poisons on your children. You have a right to know. ASK. This kind on conduct is why there are still no limits on the level of nicotene in cigarettes. Give them hell guys. These are your children they want to poison.) To defeat this measure we will need to mobilize a diverse cross-section of our industry, please don't hesitate to lend your support. Our campaign begins March 15th. We look forward to hearing from you soon. Sincerely, Joan Lawrence Rob Herriott
The Media

Submission + - Web 3.0 = Paying For User Content?

Alan writes: Web 2.0 is all about social networking sites, wikis, and tools that emphasize online collaboration. But if Web 2.0 is the introduction of user-centric services, what's Web 3.0 going to look like? My guess is paying for user-contributions.

Think about it. YouTube is going to pay users for submitting content. Even an independent website like is running a contest offering US$10,000 for the best blogger in their 'Matrix'. Shouldn't MySpace pay users for putting up their pages?
Emulation (Games)

Submission + - Alky promising to bring Windows titles to Linux

An anonymous reader writes: Falling Leaf Systems, LLC announced on Monday the availability of an alpha release Alky converter demo allowing users to convert the Prey demo to run natively on Linux. They had released the same demo for Intel macs two months prior. Unfortunately, for now, it appears accessing the demo requires a $50 payment into their "Sapling" program.

4 GB May Be Vista's RAM Sweet Spot 767

jcatcw writes "David Short, an IBM consultant who works in the Global Services Division and has been beta testing Vista for two years, says users should consider 4GB of RAM if they really want optimum Vista performance. With Vista's minimum requirement of 512MB of RAM, Vista will deliver performance that's 'sub-XP,' he says. (Dell and others recommend 2GB.) One reason: SuperFetch, which fetches applications and data, and feeds them into RAM to make them accessible more quickly. More RAM means more caching."

Submission + - Does not having signed an NDA give any leverage?

An anonymous reader writes: For the past few months, I've worked with a startup developing a new technology that could be of interest to many different sectors when market ready. Despite the fact that the company is well funded, I have yet to be paid, and the issue will likely soon come to a head. Through a combination of circumstance and oversight, I also happen to be the only employee at the company who has not signed a non-disclosure agreement, despite having full access to the technology at hand. Does this give me any discernible leverage in getting the money that is owed to me?

Submission + - Ballmer repeats threats against Linux

daria42 writes: Steve Ballmer has reissued Microsoft's patent threat against Linux, warning open-source vendors that they must respect his company's intellectual property. In a no-nonsense presentation to New York financial analysts last week, Microsoft's chief executive said the company's partnership with Novell, which it signed in November 2006, "demonstrated clearly the value of intellectual property, even in the open-source world."

Submission + - "Pharming" : Almost 80 Cisco routers vulne

coondoggie writes: "Cisco today issued a warning that almost 80 of its Small Office/Home Office (SOHO), Remote Office/Branch Office (ROBO) and Teleworker business routers may be vulnerable to a new JavaScript-based security threat dubbed "Drive-by Pharming." Symantec and the Indiana University School of Informatics coined the term Pharming in a report and white paper issued last week. As discussed here, "drive-by pharming" lets a hacker change the DNS settings on a user's home broadband router or wireless access point. The attack is possible whenever a broadband router is not password protected or the attacker manages to guess the password. 1"

Submission + - Programming the SPE's of Sony PLAYSTATION 3

IdaAshley writes: Take even greater advantage of the synergistic processing elements (SPEs) of the Sony PS3 in this installment of Programming high-performance applications on the Cell BE processor. Part 2 looks in depth at the Cell Broadband Engine processor's SPEs and how they work at the lowest level, while Part 1 showed how to install Linux on the PS3 and explored a short example program.
PlayStation (Games)

Submission + - PS3 Firmware Version Check Circumvented

Chouonsoku writes: "Before yesterday, PlayStation 3 owners had to be running the latest system firmware in order to access the PlayStation Network. The PlayStation Network allows users to play their games online, download demos, trailers and add-ons for their games. However, with a simple DNS request redirection, the firmware check becomes null and void, allowing users to access the PlayStation Network from any firmware, up-to-date or not."

We all like praise, but a hike in our pay is the best kind of ways.