Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Protesting too much - (Score 1) 803

by uglydog (#38081160) Attached to: Feds Helped Coordinate Occupy X Crackdowns
Why do you assume the responses are emotional? Why do you think I haven't thought it through? Because if I had, I'd see it your way? What nerve has OWS hit? Let's say I AM part of the 99% and still disagree with them. What does that say? For those that got a CS degree, are in debt, aren't living the american dream, and still don't see OWS's point of view, you explain it by them being emotional. But it could be that OWS doesn't represent the people on this site. It's possible that many of the people went to cheaper schools. They might not have the debt. They might have lived at home for a number of years after graduating college to establish a nest egg, maybe to buy a house. To get personal, I work hard, I get a decent salary, decent healthcare, I manage my budget, and I live a decent life. I don't need a fancy and expensive products, a big house, etc. I don't expect to live the american dream working eight hours a day. But I do expect someone working 10 to 12 hours a day to live a decent life, even if they don't own a house. I expect universal health care. But I don't expect smokers' to be covered by that. I don't know what the stats for slashdot are. But judging by the results, I'd guess that most are living decently. I wouldn't think that they just didn't think it through.

Comment: Re:civil disobedience (Score 1) 803

by uglydog (#38081018) Attached to: Feds Helped Coordinate Occupy X Crackdowns
It is peaceable assembly for the most part. But there are still limits on rights like that (eg, can't cry "fire" in a crowded theater). The right to assemble doesn't mean the right to camp out on private land over night. You can't impinge on other people's rights. Would you agree that IF the reports of sexual abuse, etc, are true, then the city was right to shut them down?
Technology

Not Enough Women In Computing, Or Too Many Men? 686

Posted by timothy
from the rational-choices dept.
itwbennett writes "Do geeks really 'drive girls out of computer science,' as the headline of a LiveScience article contends? Blogger Cameron Laird doesn't think so. In fact, 'I don't think "gender issues in computing" is important enough to merit the attention it gets,' says Laird in a recent post. And maybe the problem isn't that there are too few women in computing, but that there are too many men. 'I'm waiting to read the headline: "Women too smart for careers with computers,"' says Laird, 'where another researcher concludes that only "boys" are stupid enough to go into a field that's globally-fungible, where entry-level salaries are declining, and it's common to think that staying up all night for a company-paid pizza is a good deal.'"

Comment: Re:No matter how innovative (Score 1) 82

by uglydog (#30292188) Attached to: Google Patent Reveals New Data Center Innovations
OK, fine. Take pharma as the example. So you agree: patents are needed in some situations.

As for space flight, I'm not saying it's easy, but it's easier to answer a question once you've seen the answer. Either way, considering how you feel about pharma patents, wouldn't you agree that if a space company developed a new fuel or insulating material, then they should be able to have some sort of patent on it?

Comment: Re:No matter how innovative (Score 1) 82

by uglydog (#30278084) Attached to: Google Patent Reveals New Data Center Innovations
But then what incentive is there for a company to get into the business in the first place? I'm thinking of private space flights. That kind of research takes an enormous amount of money and risk to life. I don't think it's fair to say that another company can just come in and duplicate the mechanism afterward.

Of course, if there are no patents, then other people wouldn't know the details of how you did what you did. We are way past the age of simple machines, where you could take apart a typewriter and duplicate it. So if there are no patents and the innovator doesn't have to share details, then sure, first mover advantage should be OK. In this case, no one else would have known why Google's energy bills were so much lower.

Comment: Re:No matter how innovative (Score 1) 82

by uglydog (#30276916) Attached to: Google Patent Reveals New Data Center Innovations
But then you are limiting the amount of money that anyone could potentially make; it's limited to the amount of grant money available. And you are also restricting the ideas that get developed to the ones that the person holding the purse strings thinks are worthy.
There's no reason both models can't co-exist, but neither is a replacement for the other
Power

Plug vs. Plug — Which Nation's Socket Is Best? 1174

Posted by timothy
from the one-vote-for-three-prong-american dept.
CNETNate writes "Is the American mains socket really so much worse than the Italian design? And does the Italian socket fail at rivaling the sockets in British homes? This feature explores, in a not-at-all-parodic-and-anecdotal fashion, the designs, strengths and weaknesses of Earth's mains adapters. There is only one conclusion, and you're likely not to agree if you live in France. Or Italy. Or in fact most places." (For more plug pics and details, check out Wikipedia's list of the ones in current use.)
Privacy

Kaspersky CEO Wants End To Online Anonymity 537

Posted by Soulskill
from the but-my-computer-is-already-broadcasting-an-ip-address dept.
Andorin writes "Eugene Kaspersky, CEO of well-known computer security company Kaspersky Labs, is calling for an end to the anonymity of the Internet, and for the creation of mandatory 'Internet passports' for anyone who wishes to browse the Web. Says Kaspersky, 'Everyone should and must have an identification, or internet passport ... the internet was designed not for public use, but for American scientists and the US military. Then it was introduced to the public, and it was wrong ... to introduce it in the same way.' He calls anonymity 'the Internet's biggest security vulnerability' and thinks any country that doesn't follow this regime should be 'cut off.' The EFF objects, and it's likely that they won't be the only ones."
Displays

The World's First Four-Screen Laptop 134

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the four-is-better-right dept.
Barence writes "Intel has stunned visitors at IDF by showing off the world's first four-screen laptop. The oddly-named 'Tangent Bay' has three miniature touchscreens set horizontally into the case below the main, full-sized panel. It is a fully functional prototype: delegates were able to scroll photos around the touchscreens by swiping with a finger. The idea smacked a little too much of the ill-fated Vista SideShow." Seems strange that they would put the screens above the keyboard. I think embedding an iPhone type touchscreen in place of the trackpad would be a far more useful thing.

Comment: Re:One idea... (Score 1) 390

by uglydog (#28166987) Attached to: Newspaper Execs Hold Secret Meeting To Discuss Paywalls
no, i'm not saying we have to do this. i'm saying it might be worth it for the community at large. i'm saying a dollar a month shouldn't be the reason we abandon newspapers.
the reason im saying im not willing to give up newspapers is to say that newspapers provide a service that hasnt been replaced by bloggers or anyone else.

Wernher von Braun settled for a V-2 when he coulda had a V-8.

Working...