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Comment: Macbook Pro (Score 4, Insightful) 558 558

Macbook Pro, 15", Mid 2012 (I buy them refurbished from Apple for best price/specs). Whatever they come with (except for the Samsung 1Tb SSD, 840 EVO with all the recent fun that it implies).

In fact, this is not only my primary, but the only computer. I find that software is more important, and having just one computer makes it easier to keep track of things, back up etc. I do have several VMWare virtual machines with several version Windows, Linux and FreeBSD, all within this one, used for their respective development purposes. I'd hate to deal with that many physical boxes, though.

Comment: Good study, bad hack (Score 1) 260 260

As a matter of fact, the study itself seems to provide a positive result that, ironically, authors have used to discredit similar studies :)

That said, from personal experience (as someone who lost 60 lbs by making changes to my diet) chocolate does have beneficial effect on weight loss, in that at a very least consuming smaller amounts of chocolate (in terms of calories) satisfies craving for sweets better than consuming much larger (in terms of calories) amount of other sweet foods (such as pastries). Just this benefit alone is sufficient to recommend (prudent) use of chocolate in a calorie-controlled diet.

As far as "bitter chocolate tasting bad" - well, tastes differ and some people find caviar or foie gras to be disgusting, but by an large they are smart enough to keep those opinions out of research papers. Me - I'll take my 90% dark any day (but don't shy away from milk chocolate, as long as it's not Hershey's anyway)

Comment: I think we all know "how it works" (Score 3, Insightful) 94 94

There technology behind these intercepts is not particularly complex, so I don't think there is a significant need to explain "how it works". The fact that they are trying to "share" information that is already quite clear to all interested parties, suggests that this is a PR effort for the public, rather than an attempt to modify law enforcement practices in earnest.

Comment: Good reason not to tell FB (Score 3, Interesting) 78 78

This is yet another reason not to give Facebook your phone number (or any other real/valuable personal information)
Also, not sure about other people, but for callers who didn't make their name private I see the name on my iPhone (not that it matters).

+ - Chimpanzees now have (some) human rights->

ugen writes: According to a New York judge, two chimpanzees now have a right that until Monday was reserved for humans. issued the writs on behalf of Hercules and Leo, the Stony Brook chimps. It’s the first time habeas corpus, historically used to free slaves and people wrongly imprisoned, has ever been extended to a species other than Homo sapiens.
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re: Did they mention the yummy GMOs (Score 1) 320 320

Actually it was a pure guess, based on obvious statement. But now that you asked - I can. Here is the relevant quote about a "dr" who started the accusation:

"Miller, whose employer, the Hoover Institution, is often described as a âoeRepublican-leaningâ or âoeconservativeâ think tank, has interests of his own. A molecular biologist by training, Miller spent 15 years at the FDA before his fellowship at Hoover; throughout both jobs, he has been a consistent and ardent promoter of genetically engineered foods (or GMOs â" the âoeOâ standing for âoeorganismâ).

And in his advocacy, Miller is positively prolific. A quick web search reveals dozens upon dozens of articles and opinion columns touting the benefits of GMOs to consumers, developing economies and agribusiness â" and a seemingly equal number attacking those that warn about the possible risks of what are sometimes called âoeFrankenfoods.â

Miller was a leading voice in opposition to Californiaâ(TM)s Prop. 37, the 2012 ballot initiative seeking clear labeling of products containing GMOs, and, in the 1990s, was an equally prominent voice in a tobacco industry-backed campaign to discredit the science linking cigarette use and cancer."

Link: http://america.aljazeera.com/blogs/scrutineer/2015/4/17/doctors-behind-anti-oz-letter-have-own-conflicts-of-interest.html

Comment: Did they mention the yummy GMOs (Score 1, Insightful) 320 320

Quackery they could tolerate. But how dare he question the nutritious yummy GMOs whose manufacturers are pumping millions of dollars into endowments for those other Columbia University medical faculty. While he's enriching himself, those poor souls may lose out on lucrative $$$. Can't have that.
(That's not to say dr. Oz is not a quack - he certainly is a snake oil salesman, but these guys have an agenda that's as clear as day)

Comment: NSA doesnt' know? (Score 5, Insightful) 296 296

Seriously, I would assume that NSA at least has a "mole" in the order processing/accounting/shipping dept. at Cisco. Unless Cisco pays a lot more than market to these rank-and-file employees or gives them benefits unheard of elsewhere, they aren't particularly hard to get to cooperate, I would guess.

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