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Comment: The App Dilemma (Score 0) 122

by ue85 (#42083489) Attached to: BlackBerry 10 Preview Looks Positive
The problem is Blackberry are so far behind in the app race it is nearly impossible to catch up. Smartphone users have spoken and essentially said they want apps and the ability to customize their phone via apps. The previous Blackberry OS had apps, but most of them were overpriced and provided little function. Unfortunately the only way to even compete in the app market would be to adopt Android, which is admitting defeat. If there was a Blackberry with a physical keyboard that ran Android I would be lining up the first day to buy it, but unless BB10 really tanks I don't see this scenario ever coming to light. I am hopeful Blackberry 10 can reclaim some of their market, force them to innovate in a cutthroat market and produce quality. While still in the green, unlike some, RIM knows this is their last chance. RIM has smelled the stench of death, they know if they mess up their empire will come crashing down even more. They need to provide tools to produce in house applications cheaply and easily for BB10 and provide a market for consumers to buy applications, but first they need to make it worth while to develop. I guess we won't know until next year how well this plan will work.

Comment: Re:not really that simple. (Score 1) 120

The same big three in phones are the same as they always have been. It is a pretend competition because the three others are simply faux-competitors: Fido is owned by Rogers Virgin is owned by Bell Koodo is owned by Telus You're still paying into the same pockets. Sometimes a lack of choices can drive prices down. In Nova Scotia for example you have to primary choices for services, either Eastlink or Bell-Aliant. Both are competitively priced and offer fairly decent bundled services. With their most common packages neither have implemented data caps and the speeds offered have actually increased over the years (15/1 MBit for Bell and 20/2 for Eastlink). Both know if they change their pricing, or limit their packages, customers will flock to their competitor. While in Ontario there are boat loads of choices, all with different "perks", but in the end you're still getting screwed because they all have you paying extra for similar speeds or hitting you with data caps. Paradox of Choice and lack of DIRECT competition hurts the consumer.

Comment: Re:My experience (Score 1) 190

by ue85 (#36367412) Attached to: Advocacy Group Files FCC Complaint Over Verizon Tethering Ban
I may be an idiot with this assumption but if your provider is violating a mandate set by the FCC and they charge you saying your contract lets them impose whatever restrictions they want couldn't you simply bring them to small claims court and recoup the costs since their own contract is in violation of the FCC's regulation?

Comment: Reverse Lawsuit (Score 1) 388

by ue85 (#36315600) Attached to: Apple Nixes iPad Giveaways
Clearly you trademark your name so that when they try and pursue a lawsuit you claim they are using your trademarked name without permission within all of their legal documents and any media coverage of such. Such a defense is as crazy as the idea that you can't call a product by its marketed name "IF" you give it away for free.

Comment: It comes with a test source (Score 1) 277

by ue85 (#36216908) Attached to: Testing Geiger Counters
Every geiger I have used in my life (which have been a lot) have come with a test source (Cs-137 disc) attached to the side. Maybe this is a Canada thing or a Ludlum thing but yeah they SHOULD come with a Cs-137 calibrated disc. Else you could find some fiesta dinnerware which is slightly radioactive, I think orange is the greatest emitting.

Comment: Re:That could be extremely useful. (Score 4, Interesting) 73

by ue85 (#35813700) Attached to: Scientists Unveil Worlds First Computerized Human Brain Map
MRI shows anatomical changes and thus until there are gross physical changes in the brain you won't be able to detect such disease processes. MRI is wonderful for brain imaging, as it can differentiate between gray and white matter better than any other modalities but given the cost per scan, time required per scan and long queue of higher priority patients (stroke, head trauma, etc) it isn't effective given its low sensitivity. While I am biased towards Molecular Imaging a lot of focus has been on Pittsburgh compound B for imaging amyloid plaques. This type of imaging has the advantage of being extremely sensitive and specific however the cost and availability are even greater than that of MRI. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners aren't widely available and where they are it is mainly reserved for oncology. Many theories for Alzheimer's disease exist but given the evidence linked to beta-amyloid mechanisms I don't think the missing link is some unknown mechanism but rather no cost effective way of dealing with it considering preventative treatments exist but are limited and no intervention exists to reverse the effects. That and there are a number of non-Alzheimer's dementias that people are less aware of.

Comment: Disposable Endoscopes already exist (Score 1) 132

by ue85 (#35786894) Attached to: New Medical Camera the Size of a Grain of Salt
Pill sized disposable endoscopes already exist, though much larger than this. Most combine some sort of light with them as well because without it they are fairly useless. This won't perform anything novel when it comes to endoscopy but rather has more potential patient compliance as well as novel imaging of smaller pathways rather than just upper and lower GI. (Example: http://www.wolfsonendoscopy.org.uk/capsule-endoscopy-information.html)

Comment: Re:Free market (Score 2) 185

by ue85 (#35265182) Attached to: The Outfall of a Helium-3 Crisis
Lung x-rays? I work in healthcare and have no idea what this "lung x-ray" you speak of even is. I am assuming you are referring to MRI techniques. In any case realize there are plenty of cost effective alternatives for lung imaging, from plain film chest x-rays to CT (with or without pulmonary angiography) and nuclear ventilation with either xenon or aerosols. The if cost increased there wouldn't be fewer people getting treated, they would simply just go to alternate modalities of equal worth.

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