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Comment Re:Come on, yet another alternative ... .-( (Score 2) 197

Thanks for your kind words! (b***s***).
I beg to differ, because I foresee - not actually, but it will come - the day when I take a smartphone with me all the time, and plug it into a dock at home or work, to continue where I have left off.
Currently I am not there, though I own a lenovo ('S') with docks at home and at work, so that I can carry this (still in a backpack) to wherever I go, including holidays, to always have with me what I need and want, with actual relevant data in the cloud.
This suits me totally, except of the size of the current machine and its weight. Once a smartphone is powerful enough (8 GB of RAM, multicore @ 2 GHz, uHDMI - am not a gamer) and allows me to apt-get like my desktop, I'll be the first person to buy it.
When I'll be on the road, in a bus or train, it'll be a normal smartphone, and when docked it will be a normal PC with monitor, keyboard, mouse, speakers connected to the dock. And, no, I don't consider clutching any smartphone against my ears when phoning as comfortable, so when docked, a basic free-hands phone application will be my piece of the cake.
Logically, a unified interface would be the DE of choice, adapting to the screen size intelligently, not just scaling up icons to a threatening size like Unity. Not like Plasma 4 with almost nothing visible on smaller screens due to just non-scaling ('Search and Launch'). While I hate the old 'Metro' interface, it goes the first steps into that unified direction: On Windows Phone 8.X it is a usable interface, and it tries to become usable also on a large desktop screen. I can only hope that Plasma 5 will go into that direction, too, and just be much better.

Comment Come on, yet another alternative ... .-( (Score 1) 197

This is not good news. I'm a FOSS person, and love choices. Though I'd have loved to actually see the 'year of Linux on the desktop', and the confusing DE-mess (confusing to the new user, at least) was one of the reasons for it to not happen. The wannabe convert was so glued to the concept of 'the interface is everything' that she couldn't grasp the concept of 'the interface is just another layer'. And that 'learning' of 'yet another interface' was perceived as 'just too much'.
That's the drug dished out by Windows, mostly, that some silly icon on a screen is the application. And the task bar was never a good workbench in Windows in order to understand that you take applications like tools from a toolbox. And you put them back, if you don't need them temporarily.

So wars were fought about Desktops, and rather introvert nerds designed DEs like there was no tomorrow. And while I'm on KDE for many years now, they ought to have been hanged for the early Plasma versions. Likewise those who messed up Gnome. My preferred DE was the Gnome 1.4 of last millennium. It did exactly what I wanted it to do. Gnome 2 got me to KDE, and Plasma to XFCE. And Plasma after 4.5 back to KDE.
How the heck can anyone expect a 'Linux on the desktop' if desktop design decisions are handed over to nerd developers with nothing but time and ideas on their hands? And no governance that stops silly 'rewrites' and 'redrafts' of whole concepts for ever more shiny applets and widgets? The latter is fine, but not in mainstream DEs like Gnome, KDE. The W95 design has been with us for almost 20 years, with minor additions, and those were already perceived as 'too difficult' by many Windows users.

So what we get with TDE is a fall back for which I bet that there is no future. It can't because the only change necessary is the one that was done on Windows, and is currently done with Plasma 5: adopt a DE that can be unified for desktops and small screens. And exactly that is not done on TDE.

In a nutshell: TDE is the desktop (fork) that nobody needs.

Comment Duplo or not: Drones! (Score 1) 214

Forget the stupid AVs. They need streets, follow traffic rules, can relatively easy be searched, might even get stuck in a traffic jam at prime time.
A drone with GPS guidance and environment awareness can fly sufficiently close to buildings, too close for flight radar, does not need any street, cannot be searched, only taken down. If equipped with poison or explosives, the drone might not hit the target, and yet will be anything but pleasant.
The only downside is the payload. You can't load her up to kilotons TNT, though, on the other hand, the potential precision is much better, and the payload can be deposited - in average - much closer to the target.

Comment Re:Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (Score 1) 121

I'm sorry for you, but you did a thorough research without finding the relevant semantics. Otherwise you could not have titled me as 'UMNO propagandist', because what i wrote is exactly the opposite of what UMNO is trying to instill into the population. Namely, that the Malays are the indigenous population. If I had much more time on my hands, I'd find out some academic articles, including by prominent Malaysians, that this is exactly not the case (Malays being there for thousands of years).
Alas, you are also mistaken w.r.t. the immigrants. The first Chinese settlements have been there around 1500 AD, when Malacca was about the centre of trade in South-East-Asia.

Remains your kind suggestion of me being an idiot, because - and I cite - 'this is an American site'. Wow. Your logic is quite remarkable. Because the United States has been around for only 250 years, I am supposed to be an idiot for arguing in longer periods of time?
Or maybe you simply misunderstood the whole matter, since I never questioned anything close to your example of the Romanians. The only thing that I questioned, and I am in the good company of science, is that the Malays were the natives of the Malaysian Peninsula. And i am in that same company, when I state that about 90 % of the Malays have landed in that region as a result of migratory activities, whenever those might have happened.

Comment Re:Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (Score 2) 121

You are objectively incorrect. I don't have to pull out the resources, everyone can do on her own. There are camps where people who desire to leave the Islamic religion are interned for weeks, and months. They are called 're-education camps' where some Imam tries to convince them of the beauty of the religion.
True, it is not life imprisonment, but against basic western understanding.

Comment Re:Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (Score 1) 121

Alas, wrong. But you couldn't necessarily know.
The Malays have not been lving there for thousands of years, 90 % are migrants from other places as well, from the overcrowded Malayan Archipelago, driving out the native population ('Orang Asli'), who are in these days more often that not forcibly converted to Islam.

Yes, you fell for the usual official propaganda, which is shown by your second last sentence. That's the official formulation. Don't forget that in 1969 close to 2000 people were slaughtered in a large inter-ethnic unrest. The previous dean of the Institute 'ATMA' (Malay and Islamic Civilisation) at the National University of Malaysia formulated it more correctly: "Malaysia is a country in stable tension".

Comment Re:Small correction (Score 5, Informative) 121

Insightful? Hmm.
Do you really know the situation in Malaysia, or are you arguing out of some emotional arousal?
The Malaysian constitution prescribes favorable allotment of jobs and university places to the members of the ruling, majority, ethnicity, the Malays. And this is not just in writing but implemented. Malaysian citizens of Chinese or Indian ethic background see it happen that a student with straight 'A's is denied a university education in the public universities while a mediocre Malay student is gladly admitted. Wow! There is even a university with 140000 students exclusively for students of Malay ethnicity. Check UiTM in WikIpedia if in doubt. Malays get monthly allowances for their kids, the others ethic groups don't.
All chancellors of all universities are Malays, almost all deans (with very few exceptions) are Malays due to the constitutional 'preferences'.

I think I can stop here, and I am arguing based on 12 years as university lecturer in said country.

Now the ball is in your court: I don't have much of insight into Israel, maybe you can enlighten me on the situation in Israel, please? Maybe I can learn something from that.

Comment Re:Wikipedia... (Score 1) 119

Why AC?
I have created some pages, and found them deleted likewise. No, not about family members or stuff, but as a starting point to collectively collect sparse information about some almost forgotten actors in not almost forgotten movies. Actors that have impressed me one way or another, despite minor roles. Why is it so wrong to start a wiki page on person XYZ who pops up in the credits of a movie as cinematographer or actor, and put in a few lines, as many as I can do, a link to the IMDB entry of the movie, and over. Maybe in a year, or a decade, or a generation, some family member or another fan finds that entry and can make it grow.
With deletion, we have this unique opportunity of information collection removed.

Comment Re:Only one issue? (Score 1) 119

No, the country can't be 'fixed' by changing one law. And Lessig doesn't say so.

But no amounts of laws can 'fix' a country that is governed by people who could only make it into government by buy-ing into politics of powerful sponsors. Sponsors who expect the elected ones to push for the policies of the 'generous' sponsors.
So make it two steps: First remove the decision of the sponsors on who can become a candidate. Second, get candidates that are determined by the (voter) population alone.

If it's worth hacking on well, it's worth hacking on for money.