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Comment: Pro-War Propaganda (Score 2) 257

by ub3r n3u7r4l1st (#48670873) Attached to: Did North Korea Really Attack Sony?

I don't buy any of it. Show me the video where Kim Jong Un threatens America. The only "evidence" we have is entirely circumstantial -- from government and media talking heads. And I wouldn't trust a word they say. The U.S. government and the media alike have entirely too much to gain by issuing propaganda and laying the groundwork for a future war. Key reasons America would love to start a war with North Korea:

1. Would complete an unfinished war we settled with armistice in the 1950's. Old warmongers have long memories and a war with North Korea would cement their legacies and would justify America's Korean War.

2. North Korea has tremendous human capital -- meaning a highly-intelligent, highly-literate workforce that the West would love to exploit. The West has every expectation that North Korea's citizens would be just like those of South Korea: westernized, consumers, who have a strong national GDP. Hundreds of bulge-bracket corporations would love to set up shop in North Korea, export goods to North Korea, trade with North Korea, sell their wares in North Korea, and employ a highly-intelligent North Korean labor pool for all sorts of professional services at dramatically lower wage rates -- like the way back office jobs have been exported to Vietnam and to the Philippines.

3. And perhaps the most important reason the U.S. would love to start -- and finish -- a war with North Korea is that America could station more of its troops there as a strategic jumping off point against Cold War foes Russia and China. Don't for a minute think that the U.S. invaded Iraq and Afghanistan by accident. Both nations border either Russia or China. That's also the reason the U.S. has continued military operations in those nations. With the U.S. posting thousands of troops on the border of Russia and China, its effectively like what the Soviet Union tried with parking missiles in Cuba -- playing the game of Risk with real lives on a global scale and trying to park your munitions, your troops, your war vehicles as close to the opponent as possible. It sends a clear message to Russia and China -- the U.S. is in your back yard.

Which is precisely why the U.S. did nothing during the Rwandan civil war. Or why the U.S. did nothing to stop genocide in East Timor that killed 100,000 people. Those nations do not border former Cold War foes. Those nations do not have exploitable human capital resources. There is conscious design into the choices behind our aggression with Iraq, Afghanistan, Iran, North Korea. Don't for a moment think these nations were picked at random.

I question the rhetoric coming out of Washington. We've seen too many historical examples where U.S. secret government has created propaganda to lay the groundwork for future war. We've seen too many examples where U.S. secret government has assisting in the deposing or assassination of leaders of sovereign nations (Iran, Iraq, Vietnam, for example) with the intent of installing leaders who favor American business interests. And we've seen too many examples where U.S. secret government has waged covert war against a nation (Cuba for example).

And we've seen plenty of examples of this sort of propaganda from other nations. For example, the Reichstag fire.

Don't just go for the knee-jerk American patriotic response. Do your own thinking on North Korea. Frankly, I'm still wondering how North Korea bridged a 15-year technology gap in the 1990's, when the CIA concluded that North Korea had no mid-range missile technology despite the conservative heads in America calling for more funding on Star Wars Strategic Defense Initiative, but then suddenly North Korea launched a test of the taepodong 1 missile over Japan.

Again, don't just swallow rhetoric such as, "America never bargains with terrorists." That's hogwash. Do your own research and thinking. You'll note that the U.S. has given arms to dozens of hostile, terrorist groups, and has given millions of dollars to other terrorist organizations, if only to ensure those terrorist organizations don't attack the U.S. (for example, the CIA paid off the PLO in the 1970's via Ali Hassan Salameh). So I would not be at all surprised if U.S. secret government also gave North Korea technology that bolstered their missile program, if only to make a more reasonable case for increased funding of the Strategic Defense Initiative.

Seems like the rhetoric, the sanctions, the antics all point in one direction -- towards an eventual war. And I question that. I urge all of you to do the same.

Comment: That includes victims of criminal identity theft (Score 1) 720

by ub3r n3u7r4l1st (#48545415) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Can a Felon Work In IT?

stuff they never did end up in their name. Seen that a lot lately where workers were wrongfully dismissed because of murder or fraud conviction turn up but later were proven false.

FYI Criminal Identity Theft is the most dangerous form of identity theft:

https://www.privacyrights.org/...

Comment: Re:Fucking bait and switch (Score 1) 84

That's a pipedream at best.

If you are qualified to work as a developer, chances are you already have a college degree. That proves you are not lazy.

The police state (and also criminal ID theft) increases you chance of having a random criminal record. That does not prove you are not unemployable. (Good credit report should offset bad criminal records IMHO)

At that leaves the unemployed that are in that situation because of luck or tragic circumstances. That is why we need to adequately fund welfare and socialize medicine.

And of course, ban H1-B and unionize coders/developers/engineers.

What is now proved was once only imagin'd. -- William Blake

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