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Comment: Re:Good. (Score 2, Insightful) 284

by insertwackynamehere (#30392606) Attached to: Microsoft Finally Open Sources Windows 7 Tool
A company is not a conscious entity and acts of capitalism are not "evil" on their own. You have witnessed Microsoft make money in a society based around the freedom to make and lose money. If Microsoft sold weapons to a foreign country that they knew were going to be used to kill innocent people, because it paid well, then the people who approved such deals would be evil, or at least morally wrong. Microsoft furthering it's company's agenda in the global marketplace is capitalism. And open source is included in the global marketplace always, not just when convenient. You can't run away crying because you played with the big kids and got hurt.

Comment: Re:Scientists are human. (Score 1) 1747

by Ill_Omen (#30392526) Attached to: The Science Credibility Bubble

Interesting. Of all the "skeptics" I've read, you're one of the few I've seen that actually looks at the data and produces a convincing argument based on it. I wish more people (on both sides) would forgo the name calling and just present rational arguments. Have you done more research into how those adjustments were created, or looked at other areas where the stations were more dense?

It would really be pretty cool if AGW, and GW in general turned out to not be happening.

Comment: AV Detection (Score 0, Offtopic) 186

by I)_MaLaClYpSe_(I (#30388632) Attached to: SQL Injection Attack Claims 132,000+
according to TFA:

Malware description
Threatname: Backdoor.Win32.Buzus.croo
Aliases: Trojan-PWS.Win32.Lmir (Ikarus, a-squared); TR/Hijacker.Gen (AntiVir); Trojan/Win32.Buzus.gen (Antiy-AVL); W32/Agent.S.gen!Eldorado (F-Prot, Authentium); Win32:Rootkit-gen (Avast); Generic15.CBGO (AVG); Trojan.Generic.2823971 (BitDefender, GData); Trojan.Buzus.croo (Kaspersky, QuickHeal); Trojan.NtRootKit.2909 (DrWeb); Trj/Buzus.AH (Panda).

Comment: To Facebook's Credit... (Score 1) 446

by WebmasterNeal (#30388266) Attached to: Facebook Masks Worse Privacy With New Interface
When user's stage a revolt, much like this Slashdot posting is doing, they typically listen to the users and make some changes. All it takes a group or two with a few hundred thousand users (the site has 350 million) and they take notice.

My only complain would be if Facebook listed me in the search engine results, which they currently allow me to disallow this. The reason being is I prefer my person website to rank 1st in Google over all these other sites I'm on.

Comment: Technology vs Regulation (Score 1) 250

by PPH (#30314016) Attached to: FCC Preparing Transition To VoIP Telephone Network

This could be an interesting fight.

Technically, a switch to VoIP (whatever that really is) could be a good thing for both the customer and telco. But currently, digital telephone service, as provided by cable companies, over telco fiber to the home systems, or wireless broadband providers falls into a different regulatory regime than POTS. And I anticipate that the sellers of these services will fight to keep it that way.

In reality, your voice telephone service is becoming more digital as time goes by. Although the addressing and packet switching functions are separate from the IP networking, they often travel over the same infrastructure (fiber, pipes, tubes, whatever) and capacity is dynamically allocated between the two functions by the operators as needed. The transition to the copper loop typically occurs at the central office, but sometimes in a cabinet in your neighborhood. In the near future, in areas served by fiber to the home, its conceivable that your copper loop will terminate inside the little box (the NID) on the side of your house and, from that point on, travel right along with broadband, digital TV and telephone, etc.

What will keep all of this from happening is the legal status that POTS and "digital" services have. Actual digital telephone service (VoIP from Skype, Vonnage, FiOS telephone service, etc.) are subject to different and fewer regulations than copper loops. And the big players in this business will fight to keep it this way. In my neighborhood Verizon has just finished installing a FiOS system. And they are peppering everyone with adverts to switch to their new digital telephone service (and TV and broadband in the bundle). They are also planning on selling off their POTS infrastructure to a local telephone company. Once they are out of the POTS business, issues like universal service, long distance and regulated rates no longer apply to them. This is their (4) ???? just before (5) Profit!.

If the FCC steps in and begins applying standards of reliability, universal access and others to broadband similar to what POTS has today, most of the infrastructure would switch to digital technology quite rapidly, with the holdouts for the copper loop service transitioned to an interface at the curb. But that will never happen so long as the digital 'last mile' remains unregulated. No company (either the fiber operator or some third party purchasing wholesale digital access) could provide regulated service on unregulated infrastructure.

Comment: Re:So we don't anticipate any blackouts, ever? (Score 1) 250

by ckaminski (#30312052) Attached to: FCC Preparing Transition To VoIP Telephone Network
Excellent post. From reading the RFC I pulled this choice quote which I've been spewing all over this article's comments:

<quote>
For example, one line of questioning that a Notice of Inquiry may pursue is how to continue ensuring appropriate protections for and assistance to people with disabilities in the transition to an IP-based communications world.
</quote>

I think the FCC is indeed looking to do last-mile VoIP, and with it the commensurate move to IPv6. This may be the regulatory kick-in-the-pants we've needed to force the move. The technology is there - we just lack the will.

Comment: Re:Censorship? (Score 4, Insightful) 173

by uab21 (#23924057) Attached to: Artist/Astronomer Exhibits Photos Of Spy Satellites
I believe it was tagged "censorship", not because this exhibit is being censored, but because the existence of the satellites themselves is denied. He is lifting the 'veil of censorship' to show that, yes they do. The government is not yanking his photos, but they are replying "I don't know what you are talking about" when asked about the subject of each picture.
The Courts

+ - RIAA Challenges Cause Foster Fees to Double

Submitted by
NewYorkCountryLawyer
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "The RIAA's challenges to Judge Lee R. West's order (pdf) awarding the defendant attorneys fees in Capitol v. Foster and to the "reasonableness" of Ms. Foster's attorneys' fees have not only forced the RIAA to disclose its own attorneys fees, and caused the judge to issue a second decision labeling them as "disingenuous", their motives "questionable", and their factual statements "not true", but have now caused the amount of the fees to more than double, from $55,000 to $114,000, as evidenced by Ms. Foster's supplemental fee application (pdf's)."
Space

+ - Astronaut Wally Schirra Dies at 84

Submitted by
Billosaur
Billosaur writes "The original Mercury 7 astronauts are now down to 2, with the passing of Wally Schirra. The 5th American to fly into space and the third to orbit the Earth, Schirra joined NASA in April 1959. He was the only Mercury 7 veteran to fly all three of the pioneering NASA space series (Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo). He died of natural causes, according to his family; he had been suffering from cancer but it was not immediately clear if this was a contributing factor in his death."
Security

+ - Sparring Begins Over High-Def Movie Hacks

Submitted by
narramissic
narramissic writes "A string of attacks on the Advanced Access Content System (AACS), which is used on both HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc, is proof positive that hackers are hard at work trying to ensure that the copy-protection system on next-generation DVDs goes the way of the CSS (content scrambling system) — that is, the eventual widespread availability of software that can copy next-gen DVDs. While the 'architects of AACS learned from the mistakes of CSS and built into the system several different types of keys and the ability to change keys whenever attacks were successful,' the motivation of the hacking public is not to be underestimated. A community of people is already 'spending vast amounts of time pulling out various keys from high-definition movie discs and anticipating the next move of AACSLA and how they might get around it.'"

Entropy requires no maintenance. -- Markoff Chaney

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