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Comment: Re: Again? (Score 1) 95

by u38cg (#47861067) Attached to: European Commission Reopens Google Antitrust Investigation
Not everyone would agree the conviction was wise or necessary. IE's share was trending down long before that point. For those people who don't even know what search engine they are using, there's no point giving them a choice or forcing a choice (or random selection) on them, because they are clearly not experiencing sufficient detriment to know or care there's an issue. They can switch from MySpace when they want to, so suggesting they need someone to hold their hands to switch search engine is patronising.

Comment: Re:Again? (Score 1) 95

by u38cg (#47861009) Attached to: European Commission Reopens Google Antitrust Investigation
I was talking about the user, but actually, the startup cost of a new search engine is pretty low. There is very little cost to running your own web spider, basically a few bucks a day for several million pages. Of course you have to buy the expertise to run and tune it but in startup terms these are not exactly ridiculous. Google obviously has a depth of expertise that would be difficult to match but I don't think it's impossible to compete with them if you're sufficiently determined.

Comment: Re:Again? (Score 2) 95

by u38cg (#47860329) Attached to: European Commission Reopens Google Antitrust Investigation
Yes, but unlike traditional monopoly, there's no cost of switching and no cost of entry. If you are the only person selling burgers in the world, you can bully your suppliers not to sell to anyone else, you can price your competition out of business, you can buy up sites and not use.

None of those things apply on the internet. If I found another search engine that worked better than Google, I'd switch tomorrow. So far, no dice.

Comment: Re:don't kid yourself what this is about (Score 1) 222

by u38cg (#47845833) Attached to: FAA Scans the Internet For Drone Users; Sends Cease and Desist Letters
Depends on where you are. Generally, the "air rights" exist but legislation says you can't assert them (this is true in much of the US, as I understand it). In other areas, the law says the remoteness of trespass is too great to merit damages (the UK). Other jurisdictions (France) simply say bugger off, you never had any rights to the airspace over your property anyway.

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