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Comment: Re:Short answer: Yes, it makes sense (Score 1) 668

by twelveinchbrain (#45043927) Attached to: Are Shuttered Gov't Sites Actually Saving Money?

Then why not shut the website down altogether? Even a static page is vulnerable to attack, costs bandwidth, etc. If the web servers are on the same network, then the database servers and application servers are also vulnerable. You're just talking about a matter of degrees, whereas actually unplugging machines from the network would totally eliminate the problems you listed.

Comment: Re:Not really! (Score 1) 414

by twelveinchbrain (#33520074) Attached to: Scientists Cut Greenland Ice Loss Estimate By Half

The biggest difference between the the law of gravity and climate change science is that the former has an extremely strong record of prediction. Just about every time the law of gravity is tested (in situations where Newtonian physics applies), its predictions are correct. Climate change predictions are very often found to be incorrect, and by large margins. While this is a credit to science that such errors are publicized and corrected, one should acknowledge that basing global public policy on the strength of these predictions is a gamble.

Comment: Re:Irrational Market Behavior (Score 1) 254

by twelveinchbrain (#33211884) Attached to: Monkeys Exhibit the Same Economic Irrationality As Us

Cristina Romer, an economist of some merit, established that the policy that played the largest role in ending the Great Depression was monetary expansion. She established this by comparing the economic performance of other countries, and found a strong correlation between the institution of an expanionist policy, and economic recovery. One of her conclusions, IIRC, was that the policies of direct payments and make-work jobs actually delayed the recovery.

This does not refute your main point, rather it supports it. The policy was one that can only come from a central bank, and so is consistent with the Keynesian school of thought.

Comment: Re:Obligatory atheist flamebait (Score 1) 286

by twelveinchbrain (#31466844) Attached to: An Early Look At <em>Civilization V</em>

A religion is defined as a "specific fundamental set of beliefs and practices generally agreed upon by a number of persons or sects"

Even atheists have a fundamental set of beliefs.

Atheists do not share a fundamental set of beliefs; they share a common disbelief. There may be widespread similarities between other beliefs that atheists do have, but those similarities have no part in defining one as atheist.

Comment: Put this service in perspective (Score 1) 236

by twelveinchbrain (#31271768) Attached to: GoDaddy Wants Your Root Password

A GoDaddy Virtual Dedicated Server is *not* the property of the party who purchases the service, it is the property of GoDaddy. Read the product literature and the service agreement, and you will find that at no point are you granted the right to take sole control of the root account. This would be like insisting on changing the lock on an apartment so that only you have access to it. The strongest promise they make is that you will have administrative access so that you can install whatever you want.

GoDaddy did nothing wrong, but it's good that they put the best possible face on it.

Comment: Re:Science or Religion? (Score 1, Insightful) 1136

by twelveinchbrain (#31167748) Attached to: A Warming Planet Can Mean More Snow

P.S. If you don't have a Masters degree or equivalent in a physical science, then you are absolutely not qualified to interpret any climate data or its validity, so stop trying. If climate studies seem clear to you, it is because they have been dumbed down so that you will *think* you understand the issue. The best you can do is ready a lot of studies and attempt to read between the lines in each of them, but you will never actually understand what is going on... the climate scientists aren't even at that level.

You don't have to have a PhD in the relevant field to know when some is doing science wrong. When a research facility hides its data and refuses to reveal the precise methods -- in this case, source code -- by which another facility can duplicate its results, that is doing it wrong.

Comment: Re:Touch screens and the like (Score 2, Insightful) 255

by twelveinchbrain (#30210276) Attached to: Apple vs. Microsoft Multi-Touch Mouse Comparison

A Philips screwdriver and 15 minutes of your life will suffice to clean the inside of your mouse too.

Unless it's an Apple mouse, which is sealed for all eternity and cannot be user-serviced.

Does it occur to you that the Magic Mouse, lacking buttons and balls, doesn't ever get dirty on the inside?

Comment: Re:Hash Collisions (Score 1) 386

by twelveinchbrain (#29960540) Attached to: ZFS Gets Built-In Deduplication

On one hand, 2^256 is a damn big keyspace. I've heard people say a collision is about as likely as winning every lottery in the world simultaneously, and then doing it again next week. Bug give enough computers with enough blocks enough time, and find a SHA1 collision you will. Depending on what kind of data it happens to, you might not even notice it.

2^256 = 10^77, which is only three orders of magnitude smaller than the number of atoms in the observable universe. The chances against a key collision are *puts on sunglasses* astronomical.

Comment: It's the free ride that bothers me (Score 1) 656

by twelveinchbrain (#29638917) Attached to: Palm Ignores USB-IF Warning, Restores iTunes Sync

I think the main problem here is that Palm is trying to get a free ride from Apple's software development efforts. Apple created the iPod product in order to make money, and offered the iTunes player as a free solution so that Windows users could manage their iPods. If I were to write a free software utility whose main purpose was to support my hardware product, and a competitor spoofed my hardware product so that they didn't have to waste the time and money to write their own software utility, I would feel cheated.

Comment: Re:Apple's activity is criminal here, Palm's is le (Score 1) 656

by twelveinchbrain (#29638849) Attached to: Palm Ignores USB-IF Warning, Restores iTunes Sync

Not to mention WebKit, whose website states:

Apple employees have contributed the majority of work on WebKit since it became an independent project. Apple uses WebKit for Safari on Mac OS X, iPhone and Windows; on the former two it is also a system framework and used by many other applications. Apple's contribution has included extensive work on standards compliance, Web compatibility, performance, security, robustness, testing infrastructure and development of major new features.

Prediction is very difficult, especially of the future. - Niels Bohr

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