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Submission + - Scientists may have just stumbled upon a mathematical secret to how nature works (

turkeydance writes: By conducting an analysis of more than a thousand studies worldwide, researchers found a common theme in just about every ecosystem across the globe: Predators don’t increase in numbers at the same rate as their prey. In fact, the faster you add prey to an ecosystem, the slower predators’ numbers grow.

“When you double your prey, you also increase your predators, but not to the same extent,” says Ian Hatton, a biologist and the study’s lead author. “Instead they grow at a much diminished rate in comparison to prey.” This was true for large carnivores on the African savanna all the way down to the tiniest microbe-munching fish in the ocean.

Even more intriguing, the researchers noticed that the ratio of predators to prey in all of these ecosystems could be predicted by the same mathematical function — in other words, the way predator and prey numbers relate to each other is the same for different species all over the world.

Submission + - Drone halts Serbia v Albania UEFA qualifier in Belgrade (

garymortimer writes: The match had already been stopped for flares being thrown onto the pitch when the drone entered carrying the banner, which was then grabbed by Serbia's Stefan Mitrovi. That sparked a fight, and the eventual departure from the pitch of Albanian players who were pelted by garbage by the hometown fans. Albanian supporters were banned from attending due to security concerns.

Submission + - MtGox Collapse should come as no suprise (

MrBingoBoingo writes: The recent closure of the famous Bitcoin exchange MtGox has grabbed a lot of media attention lately, but people involved heavily in bitcoin have been raising alarms about business practices at MtGox for quite some time now. With the MtGox failure being Bitcoin's biggest since the collapse of the ponzi run by Trendon Shavers, also known as Pirateat40, it might be time to revisit the idea of counterparty risk in the world of irreversible cryptocurrency.

Submission + - NASCAR bans digital radios

turkeydance writes: in-car digital radios (communications with spotters/etc.) cannot be monitored as analog can. NASCAR opts-in for transparency, apparently.
Among other changes will be the ban of digital radios –- which are not able to be monitored like their analog versions –-
on the spotter stand. In addition, only one spotter per team, with two analog radios, will be allowed on spotter stands.
The Military

United States Begins Flying Stealth Bombers Over South Korea 567

skade88 writes "The New York Times is reporting that the United States has started flying B-2 stealth bomber runs over South Korea as a show of force to North Korea. The bombers flew 6,500 miles to bomb a South Korean island with mock explosives. Earlier this month the U.S. Military ran mock B-52 bombing runs over the same South Korean island. The U.S. military says it shows that it can execute precision bombing runs at will with little notice needed. The U.S. also reaffirmed their commitment to protecting its allies in the region. The North Koreans have been making threats to turn South Korea into a sea of fire. North Korea has also made threats claiming they will nuke the United States' mainland."
Electronic Frontier Foundation

DOJ Often Used Cell Tower Impersonating Devices Without Explicit Warrants 146

Via the EFF comes news that, during a case involving the use of a Stingray device, the DOJ revealed that it was standard practice to use the devices without explicitly requesting permission in warrants. "When Rigmaiden filed a motion to suppress the Stingray evidence as a warrantless search in violation of the Fourth Amendment, the government responded that this order was a search warrant that authorized the government to use the Stingray. Together with the ACLU of Northern California and the ACLU, we filed an amicus brief in support of Rigmaiden, noting that this 'order' wasn't a search warrant because it was directed towards Verizon, made no mention of an IMSI catcher or Stingray and didn't authorize the government — rather than Verizon — to do anything. Plus to the extent it captured loads of information from other people not suspected of criminal activity it was a 'general warrant,' the precise evil the Fourth Amendment was designed to prevent. ... The emails make clear that U.S. Attorneys in the Northern California were using Stingrays but not informing magistrates of what exactly they were doing. And once the judges got wind of what was actually going on, they were none too pleased:"

Submission + - Rapiscan's "backscatter" nude-o-scopes coming to federal buildings (

McGruber writes: The Federal Times (, a weekly print newspaper published by Ganette Government Media Corp, is reporting ( that the Rapiscan Systems “backscatter” passenger screening machines used by the US Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will likely be redeployed to federal buildings.

Rapiscan System's backscatter machines have exposed passengers to radiation since they were first installed. As previously reported on slashdot (, TSAdecided last month to stop using the machines because the manufacturer was unable to make changes to the machines that were mandated by Congress. Now TSA is attempting to sucker another federal agency into taking the nude-o-scopes. As TSA spokesman David Castelveter explained, "“Hopefully we will be able to deploy them within other government agencies."

Although the media has reported the machines have already been removed from airports, the majority are still in use at US airports — while 76 machines have been removed, another 174 still remain in use at airports. The machines cost about $40 million, based upon a $160,000 per-unit cost.

Neckties strangle clear thinking. -- Lin Yutang