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Comment: Re:Lesson Here (Score 1) 250

by ttucker (#49616869) Attached to: Long Uptime Makes Boeing 787 Lose Electrical Power

A non lazy programmer shouldn't subtract two timestamps from each other to get a duration but uses a (self written) function that can handle overflows.

I am not sure who you are even talking to. My response was in response to a smart ass comment made by a user named fisted, where he basically said that someone was a moron for suggesting counters that will run for orders of magnitude longer (ie. tens of thousands of millennia) are a pretty OK idea.

Nobody mentioned calculating duration besides you (in a perfectly sensible way, I might add). This is a smart answer to the question that it is an answer to, but a really kind of silly answer to a question that it is not an answer to.

Comment: Re:Lesson Here (Score 1) 250

by ttucker (#49614369) Attached to: Long Uptime Makes Boeing 787 Lose Electrical Power

And you have to adjust a lot of variables to become long. All temp vars that hold a timestamp. If you miss a single one, your screwed.

Yes, the program would have to be implemented without error, to not have an error... that is a tautology. Pragmatically, use a statically typed language, and do not change anything, use the correct type while implementing the program the first time.

What would a non-lazy programmer use instead? An arbitrary precision int or something? Can you think of any downsides to that approach?

Comment: Re:Lesson Here (Score 1) 250

by ttucker (#49600573) Attached to: Long Uptime Makes Boeing 787 Lose Electrical Power

If you did the math, you don't need excess space. If you need excess space, you're just shifting the day of failure into the future. Yes, perhaps far enough, but still.

What math would you do to determine exactly how high a counter should count?

Would using a 64-bit long on a millisecond counter be lazy programming?

Comment: Re:IPv6 and Rust: overhyped and unwanted! (Score 1) 390

by ttucker (#49530007) Attached to: Why the Journey To IPv6 Is Still the Road Less Traveled
I note that you did not specify which Xeon chips you actually have, which kind of suggests a set of E5450 or something similar. FiOS does not charge you enough for a continually saturated link, whether it is 25 or 500mbps, so you are still contending with some hard and secret GB limit (starts to make the $/GB model seem more appealing). Game servers tend to be pretty light, and most could run on very modest AWS hardware. Beyond that, EC2 costs nothing when the machines are powered down, and they provide a robust API & access control that would easily allow your friends to boot/stop the machines on demand. That setup is how my friends game, and you really should at least consider it when the service life of your server machine finally ends.

Comment: Re:IPv6 and Rust: overhyped and unwanted! (Score 1) 390

by ttucker (#49517617) Attached to: Why the Journey To IPv6 Is Still the Road Less Traveled

the 0.0001% of Nerd Customers ought not to stand for inability to run servers.

FTFY. For those 0.0001%, there is AWS.

Wah wah, for some reason it needs to run on under powered hardware in an uncontrolled environment over an asymmetrical residential connection, because, for reasons!

Comment: Re:Why not? (Score 1) 678

by ttucker (#49515725) Attached to: William Shatner Proposes $30 Billion Water Pipeline To California

Water ain't free, and Cali farmers think it should be.

There's your problem.

There is something that we agree upon vigorously. Not letting all users of water bid on available water is a subsidy.

I was reading interesting stuff about using forward osmosis to recover energy from desalination effluent, or even as a pre-treatment step before final desalination.

Comment: Re:Why not? (Score 1) 678

by ttucker (#49515163) Attached to: William Shatner Proposes $30 Billion Water Pipeline To California

Yes, but there are different types of desalination plants. Modern tech has hybrid micropore with solar/wind assist for pumping, and uses the old technique of glass windows to collect clean water. Do a search for solar desalination in any reputable energy journal.

Note that I said energy, to which you responded with several sources of alternative energy that might be employed. At the end of the day, the hypothetical pipeline might be driven by wind or solar energy as well. The wind or solar energy generated at the desalination plant could alternatively be sold, and so has monetary value that must be used to desalinate water.

If all else fails, lower your standards.

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