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Comment Re:Win 10 (Score 1) 55

Windows 8.1 worked fine in "just" 1Gb (my tablet ran it with that, it was a very smooth environment.)

People were expecting Windows 10 to be the "7" to 8.0s "Vista" (boy, is that a confusing sentence.) I think Windows 10 though is the second coming of Vista. I'm hoping "what comes after Windows 10" (I'm not sure how the marketing will go) to be rather more memory efficient.

Technically Windows 10 runs in 1Gb, it's running on the same tablet right next to me. But it crawls. All the smoothness of 8.1 is gone.

Comment Re:It could work. (Score 1) 500

It's not a theory, it's the truth.

In fact the mkLinux you mention was originally a port done by two guys named Mark and Karl, hence "mk".

Steve Jobs saw Slackware on a CD and, being that he wanted to see the floppy disk die, he chose that distro to port as Mac OSX. Most other distros at that point were still on floppy disk. Woz and Seymour Cray were drinking buddies so when they needed some high performance multi-threading support from Cray's UNICOS system, Woz tapped his pal and got access to the necessary code for a handshake rather than the usual multi-million dollar licensing fees.

The whole "NeXTSTEP" thing was to fool investors into thinking they had a solid product, not something they hacked out over a few weeks. In fact if you do any development on Mac OSX or iOS, you will see "ns_____" things called all the time. The "ns" does not mean "NextStep" as many people think. It means "Nice Seymour" as a tip of the hat to the man that made all that code available for free.

I remember all this like it was yesterday.

Comment Re:It could work. (Score 1) 500

Nope. OSX is a fork/mix of early Slackware Linux with some earlier Cray UNICOS multi-threading library support.

NeXTSTEP is based on AT&T SysV UNIX with graphical libraries borrowed from Ashton-Tate's (ahead of its time) Framework suite. If memory serves I think they also uses some of CP/M's successor MP/M 86 for some sweet multiuser stuff.

I remember it all like it was yesterday!

Comment Re: Waaaahhhhh!! (Score 1) 500

Jobs, yes. Zuckerberg I can't comment upon. Gates? Supposedly very pleasant and encouraging to developers who reported to him (not always for the right reasons, there's a nice story about the author of one of the first multi-app extensions for Mac OS where Gates try to manipulate him into over-promising by flattering him.)

Still, that said, I still really don't understand the mentality that says a good boss or project leader should be an abusive asshole, or that abuse is a reasonable way to impart criticism that doesn't over all cause harm in the long run. Abuse is abuse. Jobs will be thought of as a great innovator long after his death, but he'll never, ever, be thought of as a great leader.

Comment Re:Any links to real conversations? (Score 1) 842

The linked message was not to Sarah Sharp.

And Sharp has made it clear it's not criticism she's afraid of, it's the personalization of it, the fact so much comes across (rightly or wrongly) as "You're a fuck-up" rather than "You made this mistake".

I wouldn't want to work in that environment either. But then I don't really care for those Reality TV shows that comprise of a rude Brit expert insulting the contestants... (spoof)

Comment Re:Oh good, more contention. (Score 1) 145

The reason we use 2.4GHz is because we're cheap. We've known of problems with it for years, with cordless phone makers making 2.4GHz phones, and with even the most well shielded Microwave oven causing interference. But we continue to use it because early 802.11a gear was expensive, and because "advanced" equipment like 802.11a repeaters was priced for corporate purchasing, when they cost $10 or so a unit to make.

Even after this, we still have 900MHz and 5GHz free and clear. Personally, I think the 5GHz Wi-fi system, coupled with cheap repeaters, is a better system than 2.4GHz, and I wish we'd move over to it. There's massively more bandwidth, interference from neighbors is close to impossible both because of walls and because the bandwidth makes it rare two networks will use the same frequency, and there's less interference from every day devices like cordless phones (even 5GHz phones, which are being phased out in favor of DECT anyway) and Microwave ovens.

If LTE-U both pushes us to move to 5GHz, and gives our mobile devices better coverage and more bandwidth, I'm all in favor of it.


Journal Journal: So... Windows 10

The supposed pattern of Windows releases is similar to Star Trek movies, bad, good, bad, good. This doesn't make a lot of sense, I mean, Windows 1 was innovative but not exactly going to set the world on fire. Windows 2 was better, but again wasn't going to set the world on fire. Windows 3 was an incremental improvement on Windows 2 (largely code clean up, some minor fixes such as Program Manager) and, uh, set the world on Fire.

Comment It could work. (Score 3, Funny) 500

Remember that forks sometimes do succeed.

Take Linux. It forked from OpenBSD which itself was forked from QNX with smatterings of FreeBSD code.

QNX programmed itself from vacuum tubes and trace wires left on the ground at Quantum Software in Ottawa one evening. Dan Hildebrand (RIP) apparently had something to do with this metamorphosis.

Meanwhile across the ocean, FreeBSD was forked from Windows 95 which itself came from the unholy union of MS-DOS and the GEM environment. MS-DOS was bought from a company in Washington State and was a fork of CP/M. GEM was a stand alone thing and should never have been born.

Where was I? Oh yeah, CP/M. CP/M was a copy of Apple's SOS used in the Apple /// series of super-powerful business computers. The source code was left at an airport where Gary Kildall read it when his plane was on auto-pilot.

Apple SOS was a mix/fork of Apple ProDOS and TRS-80's OS; I forget the name, not important. Radio Shack forked their TRS-80 OS from some source code they saw in Lions' Commentary on UNIX 6th Edition.


Comment Re:Anti-GMO does not equal anti-science. (Score 1) 317

What if it's a good product? I don't mean "good" as in "high quality" here, but as in "worthwhile", "makes the world a better place", that kind of thing?

I mean, if an evil company (presupposing Monsanto is/was evil, I guess that Agent Orange thing would be an example, though they were one of many, probably thought they were saving lives by shortening the war, and is that division still part of Monsanto?) suddenly decides it's going to save orphans, cure cancer, and solve (or at least do something to help solve) world hunger, do we really say "Nah, you suck", or "Yes, keep doing that, maybe concentrate on that kind of thing, and less on the Eating Puppies and Using Laser Weapons to Threaten The UN Building, type stuff".

In this case, no, Monsanto isn't saving orphans or curing cancer... but it is doing something significant on the road to helping end world hunger.

That's... good, right?

I'm always looking for a new idea that will be more productive than its cost. -- David Rockefeller