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We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

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Comment: Re:Why Shouldn't I Work for the NSA? (Score 1) 225

by trippin_efnet (#49389025) Attached to: NSA Worried About Recruitment, Post-Snowden
Chilling effect is a real thing. Even if you don't believe things are bad.

Whether or not someone is actually going to receive retribution for speaking their minds is not the point.

A real problem exists when people start to question whether or not they should say X against Y for fear of having negative consequences.

Comment: They just really don't get it. (Score 1) 117

I don't know anyone who has pirated music since Spotify and the similar companies came about. Which means the companies are surely making more than before, at least in ad revenue.

Let them pull their catalog and watch piracy go up even more. The days where media companies get to pretend there is a finite supply of their product is over. The market knows that it costs basically nothing to distribute now. They're attempting to charge more than when there was a need for a physical product which needed a theater/cinema, packaging, shipping to a store, and to take up floor space in that store. Their product does not hold the same scarcity it once did. If they can't accept that, they're going to go out of business..

If they want to compete now, they need to price accordingly. These media companies can scream death of creativity due to piracy all they want, people created and performed art long before these vampiric companies existed and they will create and perform long after they're gone.

PS: If I were them, I would buy up the distribution channels which at home people use to access my product and put a chokepoint there in order to make my product scarce again.
Oh, wait, they're doing exactly that... Comcast and TimeWarner are both owned by massive media companies.

Comment: Re:Universal wants me to use YouTube more (Score 1) 117

What should scare us even more is: Those same companies are the ones buying up the companies that deliver your internet to your home. Comcast, Time-Warner, etc... What are they going to do once they control that distribution medium is the big question we should we all be asking.

Comment: Re: Why is it so bad ? (Score 2) 97

I should elaborate on the our inability to influence: We can not make informed choices anymore about who we wish to have represent us, because, so many important things are being hidden from us. It is impossible to use our vote to fix things that we don't even know are happening until the info is leaked. And once it is leaked, the game of misinformation starts at which point it becomes impossible to tell a truth from a lie.

Comment: Re: Why is it so bad ? (Score 1) 97

It is bad because we find out about programs through leaks or once they are implemented. The public is now taken completely out of the debate. The govt stonewalls us everytime we try to get information. The govt outright lies to us and our congressmen over and over again. At a very fundamental level our system is broken. Our ability to influence our govt is gone. We can not choose our leaders based on factual information anymore. Our govt is treating us, its people like the enemy. Our govt treats our questions about fundamental issues with derision and blocks us anyway it can. Considering those facts, these types of programs being implemented with no public discourse rightfully irritates.

Comment: Re:No walled garden (Score 1) 139

by trippin_efnet (#49290435) Attached to: Google 'Experts' To Screen Android Apps For Banned Content
It baffles me that we allow these things to happen on phones. This would be almost unthinkable in the Windows or Linux environments. Is it because we use 'app' and 'market'? Does that somehow make it ok? Could you imagine if MS introduced the 'Approved Programs You Can Install On Your Computer!' store? Would be laughed/sued out of existence.

Comment: Re:America, the Police State. (Score 1) 140

by trippin_efnet (#49273933) Attached to: How Police Fight To Keep Use of Stingrays Secret
I'm not trying to sound combative I promise. Just genuinely curious how far in general people would allow the government to push.

So until soldiers come directly to stay in your home, you're cool? Do you think it would be possible to have a dystopian society with clean water, streets, and air?

Again, I am genuinely curious. Particularly because dystopia looks so different to each person. But I feel like there has to be a line somewhere where everyone would throw their hands up and say "Alright. Enough already." Maybe not though, considering creep-effect, general apathy, and historical cases of oppressive regimes where people are too busy living their daily lives to really care.

+ - Ask Slashdot: In modern times how should we define a dystopian government? 2

Submitted by trippin_efnet
trippin_efnet (713714) writes "Wikipedia says dystopia is literally translated as "not-good place". In light of the many abuses of power we have seen come from world governments lately, how should we define whether or not we are approaching dystopia? Are we already there? This isn't a question about which political ideology got us here. The question is how far can a government push before it is common knowledge amongst all political ideologies to be a dystopia?"

Comment: Re:America, the Police State. (Score 2) 140

by trippin_efnet (#49272921) Attached to: How Police Fight To Keep Use of Stingrays Secret
I feel like you must really have your head buried deep in that sand to believe this. You don't even have to dig very deep to see the government actively fighting us. How bad does it have to get before we call it a dystopian government? That is not a rhetorical question. Where do you personally draw the line?

Comment: Re:Solution seems simple (Score 2) 140

by trippin_efnet (#49272905) Attached to: How Police Fight To Keep Use of Stingrays Secret
The solution will actually need to be a multi-pronged approach and yours is certainly one method we'll need to use. However, the first step is for people to realize this isn't a Democrat vs Republican issue. Once we realize this, we can stop placing blame, work together and take the appropriate measures to put our government back in check.

This is an issue of a State that is actively deceiving us, actively fighting us, and actively stonewalling us at every turn. The quicker we stop blaming past and current political parties the sooner we can take whatever actions necessary to fix our country.

Comment: Re:America, the Police State. (Score 1) 140

by trippin_efnet (#49272893) Attached to: How Police Fight To Keep Use of Stingrays Secret
this one, while not related specifically to homan square is still appropriate to the topic at hand: The UN just recently condemned the Chicago police department for torture.

http://chicago.suntimes.com/ne...

the quicker we realize and admit the dismal state we are currently in, the sooner we can take appropriate actions to fix it.

Comment: Re:Fix This Problem Early (Score 1) 255

by trippin_efnet (#49231483) Attached to: On Firing Open Source Community Members

No, the topic at hand was "how to fire" people who are whiny under-producers

from TFS: "...you want to foster an open, welcoming, and empowered community." it is completely appropriate to say "the topic at hand is how to deal with group dynamics while keeping the inclusive nature of the open source community."

I maintain that we have an entire generation of people who can't grasp that there are such things as bad ideas, wrong strategies, lazy work ethics, and unwarranted senses of entitlement to place and influence.

every older generation says this about the newest 20 something generation. "when i was a kid i walked 20 miles over broken glass up hill barefoot! because we were men!" "these damn kids!" "lazy fuckin kids"

its ok, the kids are alright. the country isn't going to spin off its axis because things are changing. things change over time. we learn new things. we apply our new knowledge to tweak and fix things that need it. it happens every generation and will continue to happen. dont let the creepy man in the moving picture box scare you. things change. accept it or become that bitter old man who is always mumbling about the damn kids.

now, back to the topic at hand. these group dynamics from the article are not new. groups throughout history have had to deal with ego maniacs, narcissists, whiny, and entitled people. even the open source aspects don't make these problems unique. volunteer organizations, churches, charities, neighborhood groups, etc.. have had to deal with these problems forever. they are not some left wing inspired issue. they are human psychology issues.

Comment: Re:Fix This Problem Early (Score 1) 255

by trippin_efnet (#49230419) Attached to: On Firing Open Source Community Members
the topic at hand is how to deal with group dynamics while keeping the inclusive nature of the open source community. you proceeded to take the opportunity to reduce it to a left vs right issue.

you act as if group dynamics didn't exist before the "aging and nouveau hippies" even existed.

or if you prefer, you behave as if "over-inflated cases of self esteem" didn't exist before "aging and nouveau hippies"

i think its safe to say, you are one of those people who would rather somehow blame this on a political ideology rather than actually contribute anything useful to the conversation.

maybe you'd be better off if you didn't attempt to think about complex systems. your "over-inflated self esteem" has obviously made you think you were smart enough to discuss complex topics. you should get back to debating which short stop would make your favorite football team score more baskets.

Comment: Re:Doesn't the UK... (Score 1) 113

by trippin_efnet (#49227821) Attached to: UK ISPs Quietly Block Sites That List Pirate Bay Proxies
Ultimately this fight, if we want this behavior to change, is the peoples fight. We need a resurgence of the "We write code." mentality of the 90s cypherpunks. The ISPs aren't going to stand up and fight, the UK govt looks to be as bought and sold as the US govt, and the muggles of the world don't really care as long as they get their sports and other mind numbing escapes in prime time television.

Time-sharing is the junk-mail part of the computer business. -- H.R.J. Grosch (attributed)

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