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Comment: Re:Ummm (Score 2) 347

by tpjunkie (#47310099) Attached to: Evidence of a Correction To the Speed of Light
The time period over which pair production-annhilation occurs might be a small part of the correction here, but from my quick reading of TFA, I think the key phrase is "This results in a small correction to the angular frequency of a photon and thus its velocity," where velocity is the key word. Velocity of course is a vector quantity, consisting of both a speed (c) and a direction. The key aspect here is the direction; when the pair recombines, the total energy of the system is slightly different as the positron-electron pair is affected by gravity and thus may pick up a small positive or negative acceleration from the gravitational potential they are traveling through. When they recombine this will be reflected in the new velocity (c d) of the resultant photon, which is not exactly the same as the photon prior to pair production. At least thats what I got, but I'm the wrong kind of doctor to be an expert in this. Any PhD's wanna weigh in and correct me, please do!

Comment: I am a physician... (Score 4, Interesting) 200

by tpjunkie (#47100619) Attached to: Wikipedia Medical Articles Found To Have High Error Rate
in residency, and yes, from time to time I'll look up something on wikipedia on my phone for a quick overview if its a condition I'm not familiar with, or is outside my specialty, and I'm rounding or otherwise away from a computer. However, I don't use it for treatment or diagnostic purposes; there exist much better, peer reviewed sources for that, which I will happily access from a computer. That being said, I'd say a large amount of the wikipedia articles tend to be pretty decent, and at least sound as if they've been written by someone with some sort of formal medical treatment. They get the quick and dirty job done about 75% of the time for me.

Comment: Re:Not a QC! (Score 4, Insightful) 96

by tpjunkie (#44066363) Attached to: A Look At Quantum Computer Manufacturer D-Wave and Its Founder
I submitted the article. I called it a QC, because if you read TFS, there are a couple of papers linked indicating that there seems to be evidence that the machine is functioning as an adiabatic quantum computer. Of course, these results have been challenged. However, for the purposes of a summary, it seemed in my mind, ok to call it what the manufacturer does, which is an adiabatic quantum computer.

Comment: Re:Unfunded mandate? (Score 4, Insightful) 285

Not only that, but the funding level for NASA is actually lowered by 5% to boot. I suppose no one should be surprised that the people who seem to have difficulty with science also have difficulties with math. Unless they think going to Mars is going to be a cheap proposition.

+ - A look at quantum computer manufacturer D-Wave and its founder->

Submitted by tpjunkie
tpjunkie (911544) writes "Many slashdot readers will remember D-wave's announcement in 2007 of its quantum computer, an announcement met with skepticism and a good amount of scorn. However, today the company has sold quantum computers to such companies as Lockheed Martin and Google, and their computers have gone from a handful of qubits to 512 in their most recent offerings. Nature has a story including an interview with the company's founder Geordi Rose, and a look at where the company is headed and some of the difficulties it has overcome."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Be still, my heart! (Score 3, Insightful) 214

by tpjunkie (#43997699) Attached to: Supreme Court: No Patents For Natural DNA Sequences
Assuming that you're targeting processed mRNA. I feel the same way as you however. I believe that producing cDNA of a naturally occurring protein (whether wild type or novel mutation) is not "creation" per se, so much as translation (well, reverse translation followed by reverse transcription if you want to be anal) of an existing, natural item. Are translations patentable? Perhaps copyright is more appropriate, although the existing copyright laws might actually be worse than patent law.

Comment: As a former Bloomberg employee, and terminal user (Score 3, Informative) 55

by tpjunkie (#43694705) Attached to: Bloomberg Reporters Caught Spying On Terminal Users
This is not really news. The terminal has an instant messenger application built into it. If you have a buddy list with the users in question in it, you can see without doing ANYTHING whether or not that user is signed into their terminal. Furthermore, even if you are not using the instant messenger, you can always do the equivalent of a "whois" search for a user and it will tell you their status. As far as determining the functions a user is using, that is due to the analytics department whose function it is to assist users with obtaining information and helping them use various functions of the terminal. Not sure why the news division had access.

Comment: Kodachrome (Score 1) 97

by tpjunkie (#42226307) Attached to: Apple and Google Joining Forces On Kodak Patents Bid
There are going to be a lot of patents that neither Apple or Google really care about in that portfolio, but people in film photography might. First and foremost in my mind is the proprietary dyes used in processing Kodachrome film, which Kodak stopped manufacturing years ago, and the last processor, Dwayne's Photo in Kansas stopped processing at the end of 2010. It would sure be *not evil* to release these formulas to the public, and perhaps we could see something like the group who reproduced polaroid film.

Assembly language experience is [important] for the maturity and understanding of how computers work that it provides. -- D. Gries

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