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Submission + - What's it like to be Slashdotted Twice? (blogspot.com)

toygeek writes: I've been reading Slashdot for many years and have been fortunate enough to have had articles featured on the front page a couple of times. I always wondered what it would be like. It has happened not just once, but twice now, I wanted to share the other side of the experience with my fellow Slashdotters. My small article covers what my website statistics look like (the Slashdot effect) and the social aspects too. I hope you enjoy reading it!

Submission + - What's it like to be Slashdotted? Twice? (blogspot.com)

toygeek writes: I've been reading Slashdot for many years and have been fortunate enough to have had articles featured on the front page a couple of times. I always wondered what it would be like, and now that it has happened twice, I wanted to share the other side of the experience with my fellow Slashdotters. My small article covers what my website statistics look like (the Slashdot effect) and the social aspects too. I hope you enjoy reading it!

Submission + - Helicopter rescues drone from Swiss mountain top. (suasnews.com) 2

garymortimer writes: Some impressive mountain flying skills from this helicopter pilot who for $800 drops off an FPV pilot to pick up his $2500 model aircraft. All in postcard pretty Swiss scenery. First person view flying is one of the fastest growing areas of model aircraft flight.

The airframe has a camera attached and the video feed is relayed to either a monitor or goggles. On screen displays (OSD) overlay information on that display tell the pilot how far, high and how much power he has remaining. To a degree it mimics flying a real aircraft. One proponent even getting out as far as 100km a 200km round trip! A flight just shy of 5 hours in length all for a motor run of a minute. If nothing else it demonstrates the untapped potential of soaring UA. Something sUAS News hall of fame personality Dan Strider knows all about.

IBM

Submission + - ENIAC, world's first digital computer, turns 66 (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "Introduced to the world on Feb. 14, 1946, the ENIAC — Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer — was developed by the University of Pennsylvania's John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert under a 1943 contract with the U.S. Army. It was the world's first large-scale electronic general-purpose digital computer, and its development was the birth of large computing systems that dominated the industry for years to come."
HP

Submission + - Buy An Elite HP PC, Get Your Own Support Staffer (itworld.com)

jfruh writes: "HP reversed its decision to spin off its PC business, but it's still left with the question of how to make money in a commodity business selling standard-issue machines manufactured overseas. One idea they're contemplating: improved customer service. If you buy an HP 'Elite' PC and have problems, you won't have to phone into a tech support call center where an entry-level drone reads off a script and tells you to reboot the machine; you'll have access to a specific support tech who will work with you as long as you own the computer."
Transportation

Solar Car Speed Record Smashed 72

An anonymous reader writes with word from Australia that "There's a new world record for the fastest solar-powered land vehicle: 88 km/h average speed over one kilometre in a lightweight car that uses about the same power as a toaster." As the article goes on to explain, this solar racer, built last year by students from the University of New South Wales, managed to nab that speed record earlier this month on an Australian navy base airstrip.
Space

Geomagnetic Storm In Progress 110

shogun writes "The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reports a strong geomagnetic storm is in progress. The shuttle, ISS and GPS systems may be affected." They think this storm was caused by a weak solar flare on April 3rd. As you may expect, this has caused some unusually impressive northern lights since it started. What you may not expect is a photograph from Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi aboard the International Space Station showing the aurora from orbit. He apparently tweets a lot of pictures from space. He and his crewmates have taken over 100,000 pictures since coming aboard the ISS.

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