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We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

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+ - Google Code shutting down->

Submitted by flote
flote (1211696) writes ""As developers migrated away from Google Code, a growing share of the remaining projects were spam or abuse. Lately, the administrative load has consisted almost exclusively of abuse management. After profiling non-abusive activity on Google Code, it has become clear to us that the service simply isn’t needed anymore.

Beginning today, we have disabled new project creation on Google Code. We will be shutting down the service about 10 months from now on January 25th, 2016. Below, we provide links to migration tools designed to help you move your projects off of Google Code. We will also make ourselves available over the next three months to those projects that need help migrating from Google Code to other hosts.""

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+ - Highly efficient LED Filament Bulbs look almost exactly like an icandescent.

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A recent article posted on a green building site gives a detailed analysis of a creative new kind of LED bulb that has been popping up Europe and Asia over the last year. They look almost exactly like Tungsten filament bulbs, require no heat sink, and offer extremely high efficiencies in the 100-120 lm/W range. The article describes their construction, compares them to conventional LED bulbs, and describes the result of a report by the Swedish Energey Agency that analyzed the performance of several brands of these these bulbs on the European market. Particularly interesting are links to teardown videos."

+ - Tim Cook offered Steve Jobs part of his liver->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "Before Steve Jobs received his liver transplant, his Apple colleague Tim Cook discovered that--remarkably--he shared a rare blood type with Jobs and was capable of donating part of his own liver to him. He offered to do so, and Jobs turned him down. The tale will be in the upcoming book BECOMING STEVE JOBS by Brett Schlender and Rick Tetzeli, which is based in part on Schlender's unpublished interviews with Jobs and which will be excerpted in the next issue of FAST COMPANY."
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