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Comment: Re:Just like BitCoin? (Score 1) 292

by tonymercmobily (#45655557) Attached to: JPMorgan Files Patent Application On 'Bitcoin Killer'

> Wire transfers are largely an oddity of the USA. Most of the rest of the world doesn't use wire transfers anyway

Excuse me? Wire transfer in Australia are called EFT. Basically, if you want to give money to _anybody_ in Australia, all you need is their BSB (6 digits, it's the bank's ID) and account number, and there you are, money gets there 24 hours later (48 hours later if you make the transfer after 5:00PM in Sydney, which is the cut-off time).

It's WIDELY used by businesses, and even people. I "borrowed" $50 from a friend yesterday, and simply transferred $50 via Internet Banking using my phone.

I was amazed to discover that the US was largely based on *cheques*.

Firefox

Emscripten and New Javascript Engine Bring Unreal Engine To Firefox 124

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the cycle-is-nearly-complete dept.
MojoKid writes "There's no doubt that gaming on the Web has improved dramatically in recent years, but Mozilla believes it has developed new technology that will deliver a big leap in what browser-based gaming can become. The company developed a highly-optimized version of Javascript that's designed to 'supercharge' a game's code to deliver near-native performance. And now that innovation has enabled Mozilla to bring Epic's Unreal Engine 3 to the browser. As a sort of proof of concept, Mozilla debuted this BananaBread game demo that was built using WebGL, Emscripten, and the new JavaScript version called 'asm.js.' Mozilla says that it's working with the likes of EA, Disney, and ZeptoLab to optimize games for the mobile Web, as well." Emscripten was previously used to port Doom to the browser.
Electronic Frontier Foundation

DOJ Often Used Cell Tower Impersonating Devices Without Explicit Warrants 146

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the bending-the-rules dept.
Via the EFF comes news that, during a case involving the use of a Stingray device, the DOJ revealed that it was standard practice to use the devices without explicitly requesting permission in warrants. "When Rigmaiden filed a motion to suppress the Stingray evidence as a warrantless search in violation of the Fourth Amendment, the government responded that this order was a search warrant that authorized the government to use the Stingray. Together with the ACLU of Northern California and the ACLU, we filed an amicus brief in support of Rigmaiden, noting that this 'order' wasn't a search warrant because it was directed towards Verizon, made no mention of an IMSI catcher or Stingray and didn't authorize the government — rather than Verizon — to do anything. Plus to the extent it captured loads of information from other people not suspected of criminal activity it was a 'general warrant,' the precise evil the Fourth Amendment was designed to prevent. ... The emails make clear that U.S. Attorneys in the Northern California were using Stingrays but not informing magistrates of what exactly they were doing. And once the judges got wind of what was actually going on, they were none too pleased:"
Google

Google Pledges Not To Sue Any Open Source Projects Using Their Patents 153

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the now-and-forever dept.
sfcrazy writes "Google has announced the Open Patent Non-Assertion (OPN) Pledge. In the pledge Google says that they will not sue any user, distributor, or developer of Open Source software on specified patents, unless first attacked. Under this pledge, Google is starting off with 10 patents relating to MapReduce, a computing model for processing large data sets first developed at Google. Google says that over time they intend to expand the set of Google's patents covered by the pledge to other technologies." This is in addition to the Open Invention Network, and their general work toward reforming the patent system. The patents covered in the OPN will be free to use in Free/Open Source software for the life of the patent, even if Google should transfer ownership to another party. Read the text of the pledge. It appears that interaction with non-copyleft licenses (MIT/BSD/Apache) is a bit weird: if you create a non-free fork it appears you are no longer covered under the pledge.
Android

+ - Google stopped submitting patents to the USPTO: wh->

Submitted by
tonymercmobily
tonymercmobily writes "About 7 months ago, Google stopped submitting patents to the USPTO. In the past, Google has been awarded some "interesting" patents, as well as some ridiculous ones even mentioning Slashdot. Then, lately, they got 200 already cooked patents from IBM. Is that because of a giant('s) writer's block? Or is Google preparing a more serious strategy to stop Microsoft from making money with Android?"
Link to Original Source
Software

+ - Filtering by license not possible in Android, Ubun->

Submitted by
tonymercmobily
tonymercmobily writes "With the latest news from Microsoft, which will allow open source apps in their store, we will see more and more an abundance of per-pay applications mixed with license-free ones. What if you can't tell between free and non-free anymore? Even now, a quick search on the Android market is just not telling enough. But what do you do then when Ubuntu has the same problem?"
Link to Original Source
Software

+ - Is it just to hard to only ever pick free (as in f-> 1

Submitted by
tonymercmobily
tonymercmobily writes "With the latest news from Microsoft, which will allow open source apps in their store, we will see more and more an abundance of per-pay applications mixed with license-free ones. What if you can't tell between free and non-free anymore? Even now, a quick search on the Android market is just not telling enough. But what do you do then when Ubuntu has the same problem?"
Link to Original Source
Media

+ - Linux loses its best free BBC viewer->

Submitted by tonymercmobily
tonymercmobily (658708) writes "While UK's BBC is still insisting that its (paying) users should use software that only runs on Windows and Mac, Linux lost its best programme viewer: get_iplayer. There is no link on the software's name because well, it's gone. We shall see how long it will take before the BBC site stops working well with get_iplayer. This comes shortly BBC's decision to Go DRM. This comes as irony seeing the somehow contraddictory stance of the BBC on open source. But, there is hope: Prometheus is a fork of get_iplayer and it's actively developed. Will this turn into a cease and desist letter to somebody? Maybe it's time to complain."
Link to Original Source
Communications

+ - Motorola's "open source" SAF is not open->

Submitted by
tonymercmobily
tonymercmobily writes "Motorola released their "open source" Service Availability Framework. However, The license of OpenSAF isn't really open source after all — it's a mixture of GPL and MPL, with extra parts aimed at making sure that essential freedoms are prevented. This article highlights in red and blue where Motorola's license comes from."
Link to Original Source
Operating Systems

+ - Does Microsoft have nowhere to run?->

Submitted by
tonymercmobily
tonymercmobily writes "Tony Mobily wrote an editorial about Microsoft. He goes through Microsoft's attempts to beat Linux and free software, and in the end he writes: "[Microsoft] is fighting for its survival — a cornered giant struggling because it only knows one way to fight (by brute force) and it's finding that the enemy is somehow countering every attack, is adaptable, impalpable, and is winning. this time, it seems there are no plan Bs in sight.". Is this really "it"?"
Link to Original Source

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