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Comment: Re:cool! (Score 1) 46

by tomtomtom777 (#35150966) Attached to: CouchOne, Membase Merge, Form NoSQL Powerhouse

Memcached is a distributed in-memory cache implementation, it has nothing to do with noSql. See: http://code.google.com/p/memcached/

Incorrect

Memcached is a key/value store, which doesn't use SQL or RDBMS concepts and is therefore by definition a noSQL project.

The fact that it is an in-memory cache implementation is irrelevant.

Comment: Re:cool! (Score 1) 46

by tomtomtom777 (#35150922) Attached to: CouchOne, Membase Merge, Form NoSQL Powerhouse

Memcached is a distributed in-memory cache implementation, it has nothing to do with noSql. See: http://code.google.com/p/memcached/

Incorrect

Memcached is a key/value store, which doesn't use SQL or RDBMS concepts and is therefore by definition a noSql project.

The fact that is an in-memorty cache implementaion is irrelevant.

Comment: Re:Wattage (Score 1) 497

by tomtomtom777 (#35148322) Attached to: Maximum Items You've Powered From a Single Outlet

I try not to plug in more than one vaccuum cleaner.

You don't know what your missing. There's nothing more satisfying then vacuuming together with your mother/girlfriend. Using the same socket definitely adds to the excitement.

We've just bought our sixth vaccuum cleaner to expand our vaccuum cleaning parties.

Comment: Re:How long will we have to tolerate cars? (Score 1) 606

by tomtomtom777 (#33836042) Attached to: How Long Until We Commonly Use Flying Cars?

Why would you imagine that tubes would be easier or cheaper to build underground? Tunnels are expensive! No, our tubes will be mostly above ground, which will also provide a better view while we're using them.

They might provide a better view while we're using them but not while were not using them

Eventually, transportation will become a commodity that we will not consider worthy of spending our precious and rare ground-level space for.

Comment: Re:How long will we have to tolerate cars? (Score 5, Interesting) 606

by tomtomtom777 (#33833874) Attached to: How Long Until We Commonly Use Flying Cars?

Now that would be an interesting poll: how long before our cities get rid of these dirty, ugly & dangerous cars?

Agreed. The transportation of the future will not be in the air but underground where tubes can be kept at almost vacuum and "cars" can move very fast using magnetic leviation at very low energy consumption.

The future cities will be beautiful

Comment: Re:Comment your data too! (Score 1) 590

by tomtomtom777 (#33518360) Attached to: Programming Things I Wish I Knew Earlier

"Uncompressed ASCII is universal."

Big endian or little endian? It's not as universal as you may think.

Endianness is irrelevant for ASCII. It only determines the order of bytes within multi-byte words. ASCII is 7-bit and therefore, there is no difference between "big endian ASCII" or "little endian ASCII".

Comment: Re:Comment your code (Score 1) 590

by tomtomtom777 (#33496132) Attached to: Programming Things I Wish I Knew Earlier

No. They are not compiled and therefore lag behind the state of the code in almost every software project I have encountered so far. If you can choose between naming and commenting, use naming. For example, a parameter called ZeroBasedIntegerIndex will be in your editor's autocompletion and therfore visible where you use it. A comment is only visible where you define it, and therefore gets lost in usage. And if the ZeroBasedIntegerIndex happens to be defined as a string, you'd change it immediately. The comment would probably stay wrong for a very long time.

So you are actually promoting the use of variables named like ZeroBasedIntegerIndex?

That name really sucks, dude. I understand that you want to clarify the advantage of good variable naming, but ZeroBasedIntegerIndex is NOT a good example. Names should describe what the variable means semantically.

+ - Chess ratings - move over Elo->

Submitted by databuff
databuff (1789500) writes "Less than 24 hours ago, Jeff Sonas, the creator of the Chessmetrics rating system, launched a competition to find a chess rating algorithm that performs better than the official Elo rating system. The competition requires entrants to build their rating systems based on the results of more than 65,000 historical chess games. Entrants then test their algorithms by predicting the results of another 7,809 games. Already three teams have managed create systems that make more accurate predictions than the official Elo approach. It's not a surprise that Elo has been outdone — after all, the system was invented half a century ago before we could easily crunch large amounts of historical data. However, it is a big surprise that Elo has been bettered done so quickly!"
Link to Original Source

...this is an awesome sight. The entire rebel resistance buried under six million hardbound copies of "The Naked Lunch." - The Firesign Theater

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