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Comment: Re:I think this is being blown out of proportion.. (Score 1) 371

by tommyhj (#39528035) Attached to: PlayStation 4 'Orbis' Rumors: AMD Hardware, Hostile To Used Games

As long as the games don't feature the "always be connected to the Internet" feature

Yeah, only that's WHY you can't play used games. To boot up any game you need to be signed in to PSN. While this doesn't necessarily imply that you need to stay connected during play, you almost certainly will do. It will, I'm sure, be spun as a feature, since you save "TO THE NANOBUZZWORD CLOUD". So, next time hackers take down PSN, everybody will find their PS4 completely non-functional, except possible as a BluRay+1 player. And they'll probably try to tie THOSE to PSN accounts so you can't trade sell or lend them. (The MPAA wants to outlaw used and borrowed movies just as bad as game developers want to outlaw used and borrowed games, and publishers want to outlaw used and borrowed books).

Hmm, I don't see why online activation of a game or movie couldn't be a one-shot thing, enabling offline playing afterwards, on that system.

We're looking at a transition from owning a hard-copy to renting an experience. And I'd like the option to pay a low price for maybe 6 months of rent for a game. If you pay full price for a game, it has to have some kind of replayability or at least be 15+ hours long. But not all naratives or game-types profit from forced replayability and introduction of a rent-based system could pave the way for those games.

Comment: Re:If any Sony Executives Are Reading (Score 1) 371

by tommyhj (#39527543) Attached to: PlayStation 4 'Orbis' Rumors: AMD Hardware, Hostile To Used Games

They've started this on the PS3 already, probably trying different strategies out before the PS4 comes out. On the PS Store I just bought Darksiders for $10, and Prince of Persia for $18. They've begun to port and emulate lots of PS1, PS2 and arcade system games like

The real problem is what will happen to the retailers, if they move sales to the PS Store with downloads... Many businesses will close down...

Comment: It's a facebook account/details farming scam (Score 5, Insightful) 340

by tommyhj (#38349312) Attached to: Site Offers History of Torrent Downloads By IP

Gathering torrent IP's from popular sites isn't difficult.

But they clearly want people very badly to sign in with their facebook accounts. First they're scaring people to sign in by promising removal from their database. If you visit the site again they provide you with a choice - an impossible (!) captcha or facebook. It's social hacking.

First off - don't let them scare you. Copyright holders has all the info anyway. Second, don't ever give away your facebook credentials to a third party that you don't trust. Third, don't trust these people.

Comment: Same with MS Skydrive (Score 1) 213

by tommyhj (#36641848) Attached to: Dropbox TOS Includes Broad Copyright License

MS Skydrive service agreement has similar wording:

Except for material that we license to you, we don't claim ownership of the content you provide on the service. Your content remains your content. We also don't control, verify, or endorse the content that you and others make available on the service.
[...]
You understand that Microsoft may need, and you hereby grant Microsoft the right, to use, modify, adapt, reproduce, distribute, and display content posted on the service solely to the extent necessary to provide the service.

Comment: Bad idea... (Score 1) 686

by tommyhj (#35963342) Attached to: EFF Advocates Leaving Wireless Routers Open

In Denmark it's illegal to use other peoples unprotected network without explicit permission. There's been no trials about it yet, but that's what lawyers here have said.

Also, I wouldn't know how to protect my internal network, if someone else had open access to it. I mean, my NAS server, uPnP/DLNA, Windows shares etc. Not an easy task, unless u just block the main door (or know lots about how to do networks).

Comment: i dont get it (Score 1) 423

by tommyhj (#35799720) Attached to: <em>The Hobbit</em> Filming at 48fps

Lots of wierd misconceptions here...

3D at the movies use polarized light, and each eye gets their usual 24fps. No flickering because there is no "black" in between each frame.

3D at home uses active shutter glasses with each eye flickering at 30fps, so the 60hz of the LCD gets split in right/left. That causes noticeable flicker (1/30'th of a second of black between each frame). It's a great mystery to me why they didn't make the glasses flicker at double that to remove the obvious flickering, but for the time being, they remain at 30fps... At least, that's what i can deduce from wearing them and looking out the window :)

Shooting in 48 fps makes less motion-blur maybe? I dont get how it would make less flicker in the movies where that's not the issue...

Comment: Idiocracy anyone? (Score 1) 729

by tommyhj (#35049470) Attached to: Model Says Religiosity Gene Will Dominate Society

How is this different from what happened in the movie idiocracy? Couldn't that explain his "findings"? Leaping from "religoius people breed a lot!" to "religion-gene is gonna dominate all" is a huge leap of faith, pun intended.

Also, almost ANY social behavior could be said to have a genetic "component". How could you enjoy music if you weren't genetically predisposed to have ears? And music-lovers breed more because of drunkenness at concerts, leading to future generations with GIANT ears, relying solely on sonic bat-like senses for navigating their surroundings! They will then have an all-out war with the other faith-enhanced human factio , who has developed bioluminence on their scalps (religious people would be attracted to that) and a tendency to blindly believe in lots of strange things. The bat-faction would then win, because their king told the theology-faction that he was the president of the world, and because of their genetic inclination towards believing stuff, they believed him and surrendered.

Aah, i love theorizing on the potential of evolution :)

Comment: please, these researchers havo no clue... (Score 1) 430

by tommyhj (#34655684) Attached to: Placebos Work -- Even Without Deception

So, they tell the patients that placebos work (somehow, magically). Then they say that for a placebo to be a placebo, it needs no active ingredient.

So the patient STILL thinks he gets active treatment, because, placebo works even without active treatment! So the entire setup of the study is invalid, and the results doesn't say what the researchers think they do. You can't test placebos this way at all, as the premise isn't falsifiable... This is basic science, something the researchers clearly haven't been tought.

Comment: Not more impressive than the rest of life (Score 1) 125

by tommyhj (#33298208) Attached to: Zombie Ants and Killer Fungus

Consider any viral infection in humans, a virus hardly even being an organism, that cause behavioral changes and forces the human to seek out large groups of fellow individuals (hospitals), only to involuntarily spray them with bodily fluids (vomiting, diarrhea).

And it isn't true that there aren't more of the fungus, like the article claims. Planet Eart clearly states that there are thousands. And I believe that an ant has a fairly simple cortex, allowing simple chemical influences to make it go up, left, right, to the sun, bite, etc.

When you have unlimited noise and only select the bits that makes for a good breeding ground for a fungus, anything possible that CAN happen, WILL happen. See - Murphys law accurately describes the principles of life!

Comment: Re:Clearly missing a trick. (Score 1) 511

by tommyhj (#32142576) Attached to: Is the 4th Yellow Pixel of Sharp Quattron Hype?

Double LCDs don't really work all that well, and even if you sandwich them perfectly, there is still parallax.

Argh... problems that can be solved by manufacturing the two layers in a seamless process! I think!

The active LED backlight, on the other hand, actually works quite well; there are artifacts, but they happen to match the limitations of the human visual system pretty well.

If they really do the active LED backlight system on a per-pixel basis, then it's called an OLED display; you don't need the LCD at all anymore.

Which is why OLED is the future! But the future can be pretty far away, and until then I shall have revolutionized the LCD industry with my sandwiching idea, muhuhaa!

Comment: Re:Clearly missing a trick. (Score 1) 511

by tommyhj (#32142510) Attached to: Is the 4th Yellow Pixel of Sharp Quattron Hype?

That would probably make the tv really expensive. Not only would it have two panels, it would need much brighter lights so the highlights are still bright. Then again, the extra lighting power would overcome the additional panel, rendering the exercise pointless and wasteful.

Just thinking out loud. Am I on the right track?

More expensive is why new technology is interesting for businesses, so that shouldn't be an issue - especially if it could make the LCD compare even more to plasmas.

I think that the activated pixels of a gray-scale LCD panel will actually be (almost) perfectly translucent, not hampering the color-producing panel behind it, unless it had to, by turning off and becoming black.

I think my idea is sound enough :)

Comment: Re:Of course it's hype, just SHARPer :-) (Score 2, Interesting) 511

by tommyhj (#32142176) Attached to: Is the 4th Yellow Pixel of Sharp Quattron Hype?

And don't forget the Green Phosphor Trails that all plasmas suffer from, and ruins every viewing experience I ever had to endure on a plasma. Those trails (or green/yellow flashes) are the only reason I will always pick LCD over plasma.

Very evident in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KV_fXCW2rOM
But it's there in all plasma panels, making my head and eyes hurt...

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