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tomhudson's Journal: How to dress for a coding interview 24

Journal by tomhudson

Show some confidence - don't wear a suit to the interview. What you wear sends a message as to what your core competencies are. A suit says "Sales," not "Development".

  1. A good-quality shirt if you're a PC, a turtleneck if you're a mac, a T-shirt if you're linux, or a leather jacket if you're *bsd.
  2. Slacks if you're a PC, black jeans if you're a mac or *bsd, blue jeans if you're linux.
  3. Dress shoes if you're a PC, loafers if you're a mac, runners if you're linux, boots or sandals if you're *bsd.
  4. No hat if you're a PC, a kepi if you're a mac, a ballcap if you're linux (a red one if you're Fedora/RHEL), and a shaved head if you're *bsd.
  5. A briefcase if you're a PC, a leather portfolio if you're a mac, a softsider if you're linux, and a pull-behind carrying a 4u server if you're *bsd.
  6. A crackberry if you're a PC, an iPhone if you're a mac, any flip-phone if you're linux, Chuck Norris if you're *bsd.
  7. Your resume in Word if you're a PC, as a video clip if you're a mac, in openoffice if you're linux, and 7-bit clean ASCII if you're *bsd.
  8. Hide your Zune if you're a PC, subtly show off your iPod if you're a mac, wow them with streamripper if you're linux, and run a script to make the sound of the drive heads seeking play "Take this job and shove it!" if you're *bsd.
  9. Leave behind a business card if you're a PC, a mini-dvd if you're a mac, a bootable distro dvd with customized splash screen, borwser, etc., if you're linux, your phone number and email address on the back of a beer coaster if you're *bsd.
  10. At lunck drink a soft drink if you're a PC, bottled water if you're a mac, real beer (not that 5% piss) if you're linux, shots if you're *bsd.

Hint: bring your own wireless access point or switch. there's never enough free and easily accessable jacks.

BTW - I originally posted this in this thread

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How to dress for a coding interview

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  • Nice one chief. Who knew I was actually a BSD guy... well, whenever I'm not a Linux guy.

    At least I dress the part. :)

    • by tomhudson (43916)

      All serious coders should have at least:

      1. some exposure to another environment, whether it's one of the *bsds, aix, solaris, ...
      2. the ability to work productively in a non-graphical environment ... which brings us to ...
      3. the ability to work via ssh, including scp, etc

      This is over and above "the usual stuff". It's frustrating watching someone editing code on a windows box, then using filezilla to move the edited file to the test machine because they can't just ssh into it, type vi filename[enter] 107gi//[E

      • by Talinom (243100) *
        ... and yes, I *tried* explaining scp ...

        Then those people are stupid and need to be fired. I had to do a massive amount of scp recently with one server refusing ssh and requiring me to telnet to it so I could do an ftp get to transfer the files.

        Kids these days.
        • Then you would have to fire 95% of all IT people.... Sadly.... :-(
          • by ces (119879)

            That sounds about right. 90% of them aren't worth a bucket of warm spit. The other 5% can be forgiven because despite their inability to grok scp they are actually very good at some aspect or another of IT.

            • What I find amazing is that even at work, some senior developers do ask me questions about stuff in Java. I don't fall for them anymore, because usually, I start looking for information and very much too often the result is in the documentation.

              That's really an extreme case of RTMF, so now I actually ask first if they did look in the documentation. Why do they think I "know" so much? I don't, I just know where to find said information.

              • by tomhudson (43916)

                They probably keep asking you because you don't play the "knowledge is power" bullshit game.

                I've seen people deliberately do that, and it really is BS. It goes hand-in-hand with the "pissing contests" culture some places have.

                • What is the "knowledge is power" bullshit game? Could you elaborate? I'm familiar with "knowledge is power", but I adhere more to the "knowledge should be shared" camp.
                  • by tomhudson (43916)

                    The game is quite simple, and quite juvenile. Someone knows something, and makes the other person go through all sorts of contortions before sharing it, instead of just telling them what they need to know ... (see Dilbert)

                    Or they'll give them an exact answer, but forget to mention that there's a "gotcha" that they have to be aware of, or they're going to waste a lot of time ...

                    Or they know where all the info is listed, but instead of just telling the other person, they "hoard" it so they can look all-k

                    • So, if I get this right: they only do that to make you waste time?!? This plays against their own image, because it makes them look incompetent to me. If someone asks me about the skills of such a person, I'll tell the person asking that I doubt the competency because he won't even RTFM. Of course, nobody asks me what I think of the skills of others ;-)
                    • by tomhudson (43916)

                      So, if I get this right: they only do that to make you waste time?!? This plays against their own image, because it makes them look incompetent to me. If someone asks me about the skills of such a person, I'll tell the person asking that I doubt the competency because he won't even RTFM. Of course, nobody asks me what I think of the skills of others ;-)

                      Nobody does it with me because I'll tell them to go piss up a rope and grow up (and for quite a while, it's been others asking me, and not the reverse ...

        • by tomhudson (43916)

          Unfortunately, do you know how hard it is to find c/c++ coders who can actually work with multi-threaded server code? They don't grow on trees.

          Besides, the guy's an okay guy ...

          We have another project that the boss tried to outsource parts of to India ... the proposals that came back were just stupid. Most of them, if you googled for the text, you'd find it was a pistache of crap from all over the place. And none of them "got it" in terms of what was really needed. We need to service thousands of queri

      • by Tet (2721) *
        Waaaaaaay too interactive...

        ssh remotehost sed -i '107s,^,//' filename

        • by tomhudson (43916)
          Nice. Still, yuou need to run make after ...
          • When it comes to talking shop, I love you guys. I don't like doing IT anymore, but I love you guys anyways.

            We might not see eye to eye on politics but on the geek stuff, I'm fairly sure we are agreed then :)

      • Agreed about the varied exposure to code, but I wager it applies not just to code/geek stuff.

        It applies to life too.

        As for SCP, I'm with you, after I discovered ssh and scp, bye bye went telnet and vanilla ftp... except for anon ftp :)

        Tweaking about with OpenSWAN now. Interesting concept.

  • a mini-dvd if you're a mac

    That would actually prove you're not worth hiring. Any decent Mac coder should know that the slot-loading optical drives in iMacs, Minis and portables can't load mini-DVDs.
     
    ...why, yes, I am wearing a turtleneck...

    • by tomhudson (43916)

      Last I looked, macs had both usb and firewire for external dvd-burners, and mac users are ALWAYS complaining about having to prep stuff for the "non-mac" world.

      It's not as bad as it used to be, when files were transferred via floppy ... (I remember those days - ms-based pcs couldn't read a mac floppy for beans).

  • Does any geek code match what you are saying, what do you were if you like Star Trek TOS more than TNG, speak Klingon and prefer coding in ANSI c?
    • by tomhudson (43916)

      Everyone *knows* that Star Trek TOS (The Original Series, for those who don't keep up with those things, which is mostly those of us who stopped watching when the original series died off) is the only valid Star Trek - the rest are poseurs.

      Psst - ansi c is dead. "gcc -std=c99" is the way to go. Flexible array sizes as part of the standard, which really helps when you want to dynamically grow or shrink stuff.

      • by webhat (558203)
        I wasn't talking about me. I'm describing my friend, he codes in ansi c. Honest!
  • by webhat (558203)
    I use Gentoo, does that mean I have to make all my clothes myself?
    • by tomhudson (43916)

      Well, since we're talking about clothes, I'm guessing you're looking for some spiffy new threads.

      So you'd want the threads package that conforms to the latest styles (as opposed to the old threads package). You want something that looks POSIXly good on you ...

      # emerge -u pthreads

      Now, if you only want to preview your new threads ...

      # emerge -p pthreads

      If you just want to fetch them, but aren't sure you'll actually wear them ...

      # emerge -f pthreads

      Or, if your new threads now make everything else look

      • by webhat (558203)
        I tried emerging pthreads, but I could only find the libpthread-stubs. So I'm going to try pth, that way I don't need to impose my threads on the the world.

        # emerge -u pth

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