Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:No support for dynamic address assignment?!? (Score 1) 287 287

It doesn't; it's capable of picking out an address that doesn't conflict with anything else on the same segment. But then you don't know which address is Bob's phone and which is Fred's, so you can't tell who to fire for downloading cat videos.

Sure you do. You can enable logging of neighbor discovery protocol (NDP) packets and logging on dynamic host registration. It isn't as simple as a DHCP lease, but it can be done. And given that IPv6 addresses tend to be fairly static, Bob and Fred will probably have the same address day after day.

Comment Re:Selling of Medical Data? (Score 1) 142 142

I'm also curious if this runs afoul of HIPAA privacy rules. They may only be able to sell it using an opt-in clause. Also, the penalty for not opting-in cannot be significant because it could be seen as coercion by a judge.

This is just one more reason why this country needs a privacy amendment in the constitution. Corporations should not be allowed to sell private personal data to other corporations or to the government without prior approval. It is sad that the EU is so far ahead of the US on this issue.

Comment Re:Throttling phone plans vs Net Neutrality (Score 1) 272 272

Yes and no. Some carriers like T-Mobile made deals with companies like Pandora where data from Pandora did not count towards your monthly high-speed quota. That's probably not allowed anymore.

In the case of Sprint, it sounds as if this has more to do with truth in advertising. If they were throttling high-volume users at arbitrary points, that could result in a violation.

I run a small WISP and I instituted monthly quotas. After a user's allotment is gone, that user's connection slows to 256kbps. But I make sure that the quota is listed prominently on any sales material, that they can check it on their status page and that an email is generated when they get down to 10%. Nobody can argue that they didn't know about it. And there are no exceptions to the traffic counter - traffic is traffic.

Comment Re:Highly evolved animals can also smell bull**** (Score 4, Insightful) 637 637

Third world standards? Add rooftop solar to every house in the sun belt, wind turbines off the coasts and micro nuclear reactors around population centers and the US could drop to pre-WWII emissions for less money than what we've sunk into the Middle East over the past 30 years.

Comment HSTS for all government sites (Score 2) 111 111

Just add the .gov and .mil top-level domains to HSTS preload lists. That'll close the code injection vector on port 80 before the redirect to HTTPS takes place. It also acts as a fire under all government sites - implement TLS or else HSTS browsers won't be able to access your site any further.

Comment Re:One word: Google Services Framework (Score 3, Interesting) 434 434

Yup. Google has been getting around the fragmentation issue by slowly moving important parts of the API out of the kernel and into the Google Play Services module. In turn, newer versions of their apps rely on the updated Play service. The only thing left behind in the kernel.

Having said that, Google really needs to get aggressive with manufacturers are carriers regarding OS updates. The first step would be to require carriers to revoke bootloader locks upon request once contracts are up. Second, require manufacturers to support timely updates for at least three years. In turn, Google needs to support X.Y.z releases for at least three years. As example, end of support for Gingerbread should have been December 2013, not September 2011.

Comment Line of Sight (Score 1) 55 55

The problem with radio transmissions in the EHF band is that they are incredibly line of sight (LOS) restricted. Any structures or vegetation between the client and access point will block the transmission. It is also highly susceptible to rain fade. And while 73 GHz is above the atmospheric oxygen attenuation death zone (57–64 GHz), it is still highly affected by atmospheric absorption. Range for a point-to-point (PtP) system is a kilometer or two at most with sane ERP levels.

There are already a couple of manufacturers who make PtP wireless network devices for the 60–80 GHz band, but they're mainly used for short distance backhaul networks. They're less expensive substitutes for running fiber between buildings or across a campus. The idea is that you have your PtP backhaul running at 10, 24 or 60–80 GHz and then you communicate with your clients using a PtMP network in the UHF band using WiFi, WiMax or LTE.

Comment Re:Waste is heat! (Score 1) 198 198

Those systems require a significant amount of labor and materials for the excavation and ducting. They also have a limited cooling and heating capacity due to their passive nature. It is usually advantageous to install an active system, such as a heat pump with a geothermal loop.

Comment Re:Waste is heat! (Score 3, Insightful) 198 198

That's fine when you live in an Arctic wasteland, but a good portion of the world population lives in an area where the climate requires active cooling during the summer months. So that waste heat must either be removed using fans or air conditioning, which costs money.

When I lived in a cool city, my Core i7 930 and my wife's Phenom X4 955 were fine. But when I moved to a city where summer temps can exceed 40C, I replaced them with low power (S series) Haswell systems. My July electric bill went down 10% from the previous year. After selling the old equipment, the upgrades will pay for themselves in under 2 years.

Comment Re:Just disable it... (Score 4, Insightful) 198 198

One problem with modern electronics is when the manufacturer figures that you're always going to put your device to sleep instead of fully powering it down, so they don't put much effort into optimizing the boot time from a cold power up.

Take for example desktop PCs. There are some motherboards where the firmware initialization is around two seconds. But I've seen it as high as fifteen seconds for a desktop motherboard and over a minute for a server motherboard, even when you have all of the options set to allow the fastest boot possible. That is a very wide difference from one motherboard to another.

When I read motherboard reviews, very rarely is boot time ever mentioned. So is this a chicken-vs-egg scenario where users don't care about cold boot times because they're happy with standby and hibernate modes? Or do users care, but it is so rarely reported that we always end up with motherboards that drive us to standby and hibernation modes?

If you have to ask how much it is, you can't afford it.

Working...