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Comment: Re:Paywall (Score 1) 100 100

by jedidiah (#50017855) Attached to: How Computer Science Education Got Practical (Again)

Only the very lowest levels of programming as a profession are so simple that you can get away with being a completely untrained bricklayer. Once you actually get to the point of building anything remotely interesting, ideas you would have been exposed to in academia quickly become relevant.

Even in the more interesting skilled skilled trades you can't get away from "academic" instruction of some kind.

Comment: Re:This is not allowed by the GPL. (Score 2, Insightful) 122 122

by jedidiah (#50015839) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Choosing the Right Open Source License

Sure. Lets pander to the flavor of the month corporation just because they are the trendy thing today. Let's forget about the DECADES of work and progress that has gone into the collective body of Free Software. Let's also give a big "fuck you" to all of the nice contributors while we are at it.

It's Apple that's the newcomer playing the jerk imposing restrictions that are entirely unnecessary.

Freedom is not a Mad Max free-for-all where Apple can try to be the boss of the Thunderdome.

Comment: Re:No GPL (Score 0) 122 122

by jedidiah (#50015823) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Choosing the Right Open Source License

You must be a sociopath then, or work for one.

That's really the only reason to not use something with a copyleft license.

All the GPL does is enforce that "everyone plays nice" with a shared resource. If you can't do that, then you're an anti-social jackass that should be shunned.

Stick to the LGPL and it's not even any more viral than anything else.

Comment: Re:I'd certainl yhope so... (Score 1) 60 60

by jedidiah (#50015045) Attached to: Avira Wins Case Upholding Its Right To Block Adware

Was it all uniform though? As an IT guy, I can relate to black listing certain types of updates and preventing Microsoft from just force feeding updates to everyone.

It's the perpetual problem of Microsoft not really being responsible with the hardware vendor really being the one on the hook. They are likely to suffer for Microsoft's mistakes.

Comment: Re:I'd certainl yhope so... (Score 1) 60 60

by jedidiah (#50015027) Attached to: Avira Wins Case Upholding Its Right To Block Adware

...true. But this is much more like the "Pink Slime" controversy over there in the States. People were not aware of what was going on and reacted quite badly when the cat was finally let out of the bag.

Legal warfare against the relevant whistle blowers in the news media commenced.

The offending meat companies claimed damages.

Comment: Re:Fuck Pay TV (Score 1) 190 190

by jedidiah (#50012495) Attached to: How Television Is Fighting Off the Internet

The problem with cable is that they escalate the number of commercials in a given time frame. This means that even new prime time shows end up being butchered as soon as they go into syndication. Older stuff (like classic Trek) can get mutilated to the point of being unrecognizable.

It's not just about how insulting or stupid or manipulative the commercials are. Content is altered.

Comment: Re:No shit ... (Score 1) 126 126

by jedidiah (#50012243) Attached to: New Study Accuses Google of Anti-competitive Search Behavior

Since there is nothing tying your OS to your browser to your search engine the old retort is still a valid one. ANYONE can get in the game. If Google is dominant, it's more like McDonalds than Microsoft.

Browsers can even send you to a different default search engine if you're too lazy to try something else on your own.

Comment: Re:Carl Sagan thought Titan was more important (Score 3, Interesting) 98 98

by NormalVisual (#50003885) Attached to: Why Didn't Voyager Visit Pluto?
And what gives him the authority to dictate to NASA how to run their space program?

Mostly the fact that he was one of the most prominent and well-rounded planetary astronomers and astrobiologists in the world, and the fact that he had a pretty good batting average in predicting conditions on Venus, Europa, and other bodies that were later confirmed. Sagan didn't dictate the Voyagers' itineraries, but NASA sure as hell wanted to know what he had to say.

Comment: Re:Because titan has ice, pluto isn't even a plane (Score 4, Informative) 98 98

by NormalVisual (#50003825) Attached to: Why Didn't Voyager Visit Pluto?
I believe Voyager 1 still hasn't passed pluto if projected back down onto its orbital plane.

Voyager 1 is almost 20 billion miles away from us now, and is traveling about 35 degrees out of the ecliptic. Some really rough trigonometry shows that if you project that down onto the ecliptic, it's still about 16 billion miles away from the Sun, which is almost three times the length of the long axis of Pluto's entire orbit.

Comment: iPhones less bendable than others (Score 2) 149 149

by SuperKendall (#50003647) Attached to: AppleCare+ Now Covers Batteries That Drop To 80%

The iPhone 6+ is in fact less bendable than the Samsung phones, and the Samsung phones have screens that will shatter instead of bending slightly...

But in fact the iPhone 6+ is easily good for more than a day of charge. So if you want an iPhone that you don't have to think about the battery, they already sell one.

"Ninety percent of baseball is half mental." -- Yogi Berra

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