Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


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Submission + - Why Apple Replaced iOS Maps - Turn-by-Turn Voice Navigation (

tlhIngan writes: "So why did Apple decide to ditch the (working) iOS maps app with one based on their own data (despite having one more year to the contract)? It turns out to be turn-by-turn voice navigation. It wasn't a feature in the original Apple-Google licensing agreement, so Apple went back to Google to renegotiate what has become a top-tier feature on Android. Apple wanted it. In return, Google wanted increased branding in the maps app (Apple refused) or to integrate Lattitude (Google's FourSquare competitor), to which Apple refused as well. As a result Apple was forced to seek other sources in order to obtain this feature."

Submission + - Apple v. Samsung: Appeal blocks lifting of Galaxy Tab ban (

tlhIngan writes: "Oops. The Galaxy Tab 10.1 was found to be non-infringing in the recent Apple v. Samsung case, and as such, the ban on its sale should be lifted. However, because Samsung has appealed the ruling Judge Koh cannot lift the injunction, even though she wants to. Because the appeal is before a different court, her court no longer has jurisdiction to lift the injunction and thus cannot lift it until jurisdiction has been returned back. Note that is applies to the old Galaxy Tab — Samsung has since released a new model that is not covered by the injunction."

Submission + - Google Warned Samsung Galaxy Tab was "too similar" (

tlhIngan writes: "Some interesting news has come out of Apple's filings against Samsung. First, Google warned Samsung that their "P1" (Galaxy Tab) and "P3" (Galaxy Tab 10.1) tablets were "too similar" to the iPad. In addition, Samsung's own Product Design Group note it was "regrettable" that the Galaxy S "looks similar" to the iPhone. Finally, how designers at a Samsung-sponsored evaluation noted the Galaxy S "copied the iPhone too much" and "innovation is needed". Of course, Samsung has some ammunition of its own, including how Apple copied Sony's designs.

In unrelated news, Judge Grewal has sanctioned Samsung for not preserving emails from automatic deletion, even after litigation has begun."

Submission + - Malware strikes Apple iOS App Store Again (

tlhIngan writes: "Well, it's happened again. Malware has slipped past Apple again and appeared in the iOS App Store. This time though, an iOS application came bundled with two Windows executables containing relatively old malware. It will not infect an iOS device nor Macs, but might affect Windows iTunes users. Looks like Apple needs to update their Windows malware scanner for iOS app submissions now."

Submission + - Motorola scores a Two-Fer in Patent rulings (

tlhIngan writes: "This week is Motorola's lucky week, for they won twice. First, an ITC judge has ruled that Microsoft's Xbox 360 has violated 4 of 5 patents related to h.264. This is just a preliminary ruling and both Microsoft and Motorola will face an ITC panel later this year. In the other case, the ITC judge has ruled Apple violates a 3G patent, one that a German court ruled that Apple didn't violate earlier this year.

Perhaps Google shouldn't be so quick to get rid of Motorola."


Submission + - Apple and Samsung agree to settlement talks (

tlhIngan writes: It looks like the Apple v. Samsung war might be over soon. Both parties have agreed to meet to attempt to reach a settlement. While they are not required to settle (Google and Oracle recently went through the same process), it could be a positive signal that Apple might be willing to license the patents under Tim Cook, versus fight it out in court under the late Steve Jobs.

Submission + - Apple changes App Ranks, Rejects Pay Per Install (

tlhIngan writes: "Recently, Apple changes their App Store ranking algorithm to stop ranking apps by download counts and instead using something else, akin to the recent Google changing of their Markplace ranking algorithm to give more weight to apps actual usage. As a side effect, Apple has also started rejecting pay-per-install apps ("freemium" apps that request the user to install companion apps to earn in-game currency). These apps were often used to game the charts by artifically inflating the download count and raising the ranking of the app in the App Store. No word on how companies like TapJoy (one of the largest "culprits") will react."

Submission + - Another jailbroken iPhone worm, steals data now (

tlhIngan writes: "Hot on the heels of the rickrolling worm comes report of a new jailbroken iPhone worm. This time, it's not so innoculous, and it will retrieve and forward your email, SMS, calendar, and other data you may have stored on your iPhone (including data from apps you may have installed). Again, its infection vector is identical — iPhones that have been jailbroken, have SSH servers installed, and have the default password set (i.e., "alpine" for both root and mobile users)."

Apple Claims That Jail-Breaking Is Illegal 610

rmav writes "Apple has finally made a statement about jail-breaking. They try to sell the idea that it is a copyright infringement and DMCA violation. This, despite the fact (as the linked article states) that courts have ruled that copying software while reverse engineering is a fair use when done for purposes of fostering interoperability with independently created software. I cannot help but think that the recent flood of iPhone cracked applications is responsible for this. Before that, Apple was quietly ignoring the jailbreak scene. Now, I suppose that in the future we may only install extra applications on our iPhones as ad hoc installs using the SDK, and if we want turn-by-turn directions, tethering, and the like, we have to compile these apps by ourselves? Maybe we should go and download the cydia source code and see what we can do with it."

We're living in a golden age. All you need is gold. -- D.W. Robertson.