Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
The Internet

The Pirate Bay Finds Permanent Home 103

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the sphere-of-invulnerability-rank-one dept.
SlashRating©
8675309
slashdottit! tm
C4st13v4n14 writes "The Pirate Bay finally gets permanent hosting and immunity against foreign copyright holders." No clue how long this latest arrangement will hold out, or if copyright holders will be able to touch them while they are hosted in their new location. I wonder what the deal looked like to get this done. Strange bedfellows indeed.
Music

+ - The Best P2P Network Nowadays?

Submitted by
rigamarole
rigamarole writes "Well, I've been using Limewire for most of my mp3 downloads for the past while. At first I was very satisfied with it after switching from Ares, because my download times were significantly faster. Recently though, I've been getting a lot of results like, "Stephen Spielberg gets a hilarious prank call!" and other such nonsense. Note that I get a lot of search results like this on both audio and video-specific searches. I'm sick of Limewire now, and I'm wondering what people in the know are using for their downloads nowadays. I should note that I've had some satisfactory results from using isoHunt for movie downloads, but I have no idea how good of a music source it is...and I prefer the classic KaZaA/Ares/Limewire layout anyhow. Thoughts?"
Businesses

Are Unfinished Products Now the Norm? 111

Posted by Cliff
from the not-ready-for-prime-time dept.
Paul asks: "Long ago when digital synthesizers first became commonly available, I recall a reviewer lamenting how he was getting more and more products to test whose software was unfinished and buggy and would require updates and fixes (this, before the internet allowed easy downloads, would have meant a journey to a specialist repair center). The review also commented how this common problem with computer software was spreading (this was before Windows 95 was out), and asked if it was going to become the norm. These days it seems ubiquitous, with PDAs, digital cameras, PVRs and all manner of complex goods needing after-market firmware fixes often simply to make them have the features promised in the adverts, let alone add enhancements. Are we seeing this spread beyond computers and computer-based products; jokes apart, will we be booting our cars up and installing flash updates every week to prevent computer viruses getting into the control systems? Can anyone comment on any recent purchases where they've been badly let down by missing features, or are still waiting for promised updates even whilst a new model is now on the shelves? How can we make the manufacturers take better responsibility? Apart from reading every review possible before making a purchase, what strategy do you have, or propose, for not being caught out?"
Education

Getting in to a Top Tier College? 177

Posted by Cliff
from the secrets-of-admission dept.
IvyLeague Engineer asks: "I'm currently a senior at a top rated public school and I look forward to majoring in Electrical Engineering. I've already been accepted into Carnegie Mellon University, so I don't need to worry about any 'safety' schools. However, I still have my sights set on getting into a school such as MIT or Cal Tech. My grades are high (95.6 on a 100 scale), I have several leadership positions in clubs, however I'm pretty sure that's not enough. What else can I do to improve my chances of being accepted there? I've already been deferred from early action at both institutions and I'm afraid it's too late to do much at this point. I'm sure there are other people like me wondering just what it takes to get admitted to a prestigious college."

More PDF Blackout Follies 309

Posted by timothy
from the it's-even-secret-what-they-want-secret dept.
georgewilliamherbert writes "The latest installment of "As the PDF Blackouts Turn" hit today, with a U.S. government apparently releasing a redacted version of their court filing in the Balco grand jury leak case which merely stuck a black line over the text, which remains available in the document. As with prior documents, entering text cut/paste mode in a normal PDF browser such as Acrobat allows a reader to access the concealed text. Previous incidents include an AT&T filing in the NSA case." This works with Xpdf and KPDF, too; for KPDF, use the selection tool (under the Tools menu) around the redacted section, copy to clipboard, then paste into the text-manipulator of your choice.

Yes, we will be going to OSI, Mars, and Pluto, but not necessarily in that order. -- Jeffrey Honig

Working...