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Japan

JAXA Successfully Tests Its D-SEND Low-Noise Supersonic Aircraft 9 9

AmiMoJo writes: JAXA, the Japanese space agency, has successfully tested its low sonic boom demonstration aircraft D-SEND#2. The unmanned aircraft is floated up to 30,000m by balloon and released, falling back to earth and breaking the sound barrier in the process. The sonic boom created is measured on the ground. The project aims to halve the noise created by sonic booms, paving the way for future supersonic aircraft.

Submission + - JAXA successfully tests its D-SEND low noise supersonic aircraft

AmiMoJo writes: JAXA, the Japanese space agency, has successfully tested it's low sonic boom demonstration aircraft D-SEND#2. The unmanned aircraft is floated up to 30,000m by balloon and released, falling back to earth and breaking the sound barrier in the process. The sonic boom created is measured on the ground. The project aims to halve the noise created by sonic booms, paving the way for future supersonic aircraft.

Submission + - HuffPost's New Tool Will Automatically Delete Emails For Vacationing Employees->

moorhouse1 writes: How often have you gotten an "out of office" auto-response from a co-worker or a client, only to receive an actual response 15 minutes later?


At many companies, this behavior has become the norm rather than the exception.These days, that out-of-office reply doesn't mean much. Nearly half of U.S. employeescheck their work email at least once a day during their vacation time.


Huffington Post editor-in-chief Arianna Huffington has long told employees that they are not expected to respond to email after hours, on the weekends and during vacation. And yet, she says, she's continued to see emails popping up moments after the out-of-office reply.


"As soon as we see the number '1' appear on our mail app icon, or an alert flash across the top of our screen, most of us — myself very much included — can't help but respond," Huffington said.


But what if we never see the email in the first place? After Huffington read about a policy at the German car company Daimler that gave employees the option to have any emails received during vacationautomatically deleted, she was inspired to implement a similar policy for her own employees.


In June, HuffPost's tech team created a tool that automatically deletes or archives any messages received for the duration of the time an employee has an out-of-office responder in place. Employees have the option of setting up the tool when they go on vacation.



"The science is in on what most people already intuitively know — we perform better, we think better and we make better decisions when we're refreshed and well-rested," Huffington said. "Whether we're traveling abroad or trying to unwind in the neighborhood park, if we're constantly checking our work email, we're not really vacating from the daily grind."
No rest for the weary


Our downtime is increasingly encroached upon by work stress and 24/7 connectivity, and work email is arguably our most insidious tech habit.


A2013 survey found that more than 80 percent of employees in the U.S. check their email while not at work, and a third of employees usually respond to emails within 15 minutes. In a study published last year, occupational psychologists foundthat this type of fixation on work email can contribute to physical and mental burnout.


Research has even shown that up to 80 percent of people experience "email apnea"-- atendency to hold one's breath or engage in shallow breathing while checking or sending emails.


"This cumulative compromised breathing puts us in a chronic fight-or-flight state," digital culture researcher Linda Stone told HuffPost. "When were in this state, we are more likely to have the thought patterns, 'What do I have to lose? What might I miss? Can I keep up? Am I out of touch? Am I needed?'"


This type of chronic stress makes the need for tech-free vacation time all the more urgent.


"People often dont use their vacation time to vacation, and many dont take vacations at all," Stone explained. "Our bodies and our lives have seasons and rhythms just as nature does. Winter, spring, summer, fall. Vacation, sleep, rest are a 'season.'"


Adopting an "always-on" lifestyle and ignoring these natural rhythms of work and rest comes at a cost, both for an individual's well-being and productivity, and for a company's bottom line.


But when we do take the time to unplug, the results can be nothing short of transformative.
Unplug your phone, free your mind


A group of neuroscientists recentlyobserved 35 CEOs and entrepreneurswhile they underwent a digital detox in the Moroccan desert, and found that going device-free improved the subjects' quality of sleep, social interactions and memory. Many of the participants described the detox as a "life-changing experience," and said they wanted to incorporate elements of unplugging into their everyday lives.


As Stone explained, "If a person gives him or herself even one full day of vacation — that is, one full day of not getting online and instead, resting, playing and moving — the desire to get online will diminish."

"Using the tool made me realize how addicted I am to my email," said HuffPost Photo Editor Damon Scheleur, who recently set up the email deletion tool while on vacation. "It took me a while to appreciate it because of the fear of not being in the loop anymore, but then it was a huge weight off my shoulders. It allowed me to pay more attention to my kids."

Editorial Director Danny Shea added, "It's nice when you're taking time off and you can really unplug, but the real power is coming back and not having to go through 10 days' worth of email ... and knowing that you can focus on what you need to focus on."

Still not convinced? A 2012 study found that people's stress levels dropped significantly over a five-day period when they didn't check email.

Currently,Huffington is enjoying her own email detoxwhile on a family vacation in Greece.

"Just sent this post to my manager who went on vacation today with her family (she hasn't had a vacation in a while and has had a very tough month) and has been sending emails all day!" one Instagram commenter said in response to Huffington's post about her detox.

"The bottom line is that we all need downtime," Huffington said. "We all need time to unplug, recharge, to not just survive and succeed, but thrive."

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.










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Submission + - Super-Intense Auroras Discovered On Strange Alien World->

viewmaniac1 writes: For the first time ever, the celestial light shows known as auroras have been detected outside our solar system.


The auroras were detected not on an exoplanet but on a brown dwarf, one of a class of objects that are too big to be planets but too small to sustain the fusion reactions seen in stars.


Astronomers say the alien auroras probably look a lot like the auroras (Northern lights) seen here on Earth, only more reddish and much, much more intense.


"If you were able to stand on the surface of the brown dwarf we observed--something you could never do because of its extremely hot temperatures and crushing surface gravity--you would sometimes be treated to a fantastic light show courtesy of auroras hundreds of thousands of times more powerfulthan any detected in our solar system," Dr. Gregg Hallinan, assistant professor of astronomy at Caltech in Pasadena, Calif. and the leader of the international team of astronomers who made the discovery, said in a written statement.


(Story continues below video.)

(function(){var src_url="https://spshared.5min.com/Scripts/PlayerSeed.js?playList=518981776&height=381&width=570&sid=577&origin=undefined&videoGroupID=155847&relatedNumOfResults=100&responsive=false&relatedMode=2&relatedBottomHeight=60&companionPos=&hasCompanion=false&autoStart=false&colorPallet=%23FFEB00&videoControlDisplayColor=%23191919&shuffle=0&isAP=1&pgType=cmsPlugin&pgTypeId=addToPost-top&onVideoDataLoaded=track5min.DL&onTimeUpdate=track5min.TConVideoDataLoaded=HPTrack.Vid.DLonTimeUpdate=HPTrack.Vid.TC";if (typeof(commercial_video) == "object") {src_url += "siteSection="+commercial_video.site_and_category;if (commercial_video.package) {src_url += "sponsorship="+commercial_video.package;}}var script = document.createElement("script");script.src = src_url;script.async = true;var placeholder = document.querySelector(".js-fivemin-script");placeholder.parentElement.replaceChild(script, placeholder);})();

The brown dwarf that hosts the auroras is known formally as LSR J1835+3259. It's located about 20 light-years from Earth in the constellation Lyra.


Astronomers spotted the auroras with the help of optical telescopes and the Very Large Array, a powerful radio astronomy observatory located near Socorro, N.M.


The discovery, which was described in a paper published in the journal Natureon July 30, brings astronomers' understanding of brown dwarfs into sharper focus.


"We already know from observations of brown dwarfs that they have clouds in the atmosphere," Dr. Stuart Littlefair, an astrophysicist at the University of Sheffield in England, told the BBC. Now that we know brown dwarfs can have auroras, he added, "it is yet more reason to consider brown dwarfs as scaled-up versions of planetsrather than scaled-down versions of stars."


What's more, the discovery that objects outside the solar system can have auroras may help fine-tune the ongoing search for extraterrestrial life. As Hallinan told The Huffington Post in an email, the presence of auroras on an exoplanet, for example, would suggest that it had a magnetic field capable of protecting it against violent solar storms (known as coronal mass ejections) unleashed by its host star.


"Our sun is now a pretty mild middle-aged star, but many other stars produce enormous flares that can threaten the habitability of any planets that may orbit them," Hallinan said in the email. "Having a magnetic field to act as a 'magnetic shield' may be crucial for life on those planets."


Hallinan said his team is already hunting for auroras on exoplanets with help from a new radio telescopeerected near Bishop, Calif.


"We image the entire sky to allow us to monitor thousands of stellar systems and planets simultaneously," Hallinan said, "such that when a coronal mass ejection from a star hits a planet and its aurorae light up, we will be watching and can measure its magnetic field!"


-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.










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Submission + - Tracking Data casts doubt on Kentucky Drone Shooter's Story->

McGruber writes: The owner of a drone shot down by Kentucky man (http://tech.slashdot.org/story/15/07/29/142227/kentucky-man-arrested-after-shooting-down-drone) is now telling his side of the story: David Boggs says he had just bought the drone a few days earlier and was planning on using it to shoot video of his kids riding motocross. (http://www.wdrb.com/story/29675427/drone-owner-responds-to-claims-of-privacy-invasion)

Boggs also shared the drone's tracking data with the media. "We are now 193 feet above the ground,” Boggs described as he showed the flight path. “This area here is the world-famous drone slayer home, and this is a neighbor's home, and our friends live over here, and over here, and over here. You will see now that we did not go below this altitude — we even went higher — nor did we hover over their house to look in. And for sure didn't descend down to no 10 feet, or look under someone's canopy, or at somebody's daughter."

The track does show that the drone hovered for around 30 seconds near Merideth’s home but was at an altitude in excess of 200 feet.

However, drone slayer Willie Merideth says he downed the drone using bird shot, an ammunition Merideth says would not have caused enough damage to bring the drone down at an altitude of more than 200 feet. “His claims are that the drone never got below 200 feet,” Merideth said on Thursday. “Number 8 bird shot is not going to take anything out at 200 feet.”

Both Boggs and Merideth say they want to see the video that the drone captured but neither seems to know what happened to the memory card inside the drone that saved the video. “The reason we don’t have the live footage is because when we got there where the drone was shot down and a neighbor had gone and retrieved it and the SD card was gone,” Boggs said. “We want that SD card.”

When asked, Merideth didn’t have an answer either. “We have no idea where that's at,” he said.

Meredith is facing two felony charges of wanton endangerment and criminal mischief. He appears in court this September. (http://www.whas11.com/story/news/local/2015/07/31/local-resident-shoots-drone-down-faces-two-felony-charges/30921593/)

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Communications

In Korea, Smartphones Use Multipath TCP To Reach 1 Gbps 18 18

An anonymous reader writes: Korean users are among the most bandwidth-hungry smartphone users. During the MPTCP WG meeting at IETF'93, SungHoon Seo announced that KT had deployed since mid June a commercial service that allows smartphone users to reach 1 Gbps. This is not yet 5G, but the first large scale commercial deployment of Multipath TCP by a mobile operator to combine fast LTE and fast WiFi to reach up to 1 Gbps. This service is offered on the Samsung Galaxy S6 whose Linux kernel includes the open-source Multipath TCP implementation and SOCKSv5 proxies managed by the network operator. Several thousands of users are already actively using this optional service.

Submission + - In Korea smartphones use Multipath TCP to reach 1 Gbps->

An anonymous reader writes: Korean users are among the most bandwidth-hungry smartphone users. During the MPTCP WG meeting at IETF'93, SungHoon Seo announced that KT had deployed since mid June a commercial service that allows smartphone users to reach 1 Gbps. This is not yet 5G, but the first large scale commercial deployment of Multipath TCP by a mobile operator to combine fast LTE and fast WiFi to reach up to 1 Gbps. This service is offered on the Samsung Galaxy S6 whose Linux kernel includes the open-source Multipath TCP implementation and SOCKSv5 proxies managed by the network operator. Several thousands of users are already actively using this optional service.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Astronomers Discover the Most Powerful Aurora Ever Recorded ->

Sepa Blackforesta writes: Astronomers have discovered the most powerful aurora ever recorded in an object beyond our solar system. The aurora is the first to be discovered around a brown dwarf, known as LSRJ 1835+3259 (LSRJ). Its 10,000 times more powerful than any previously seen, and also it’s not coming from a planet at all. This behemoth is coming from a low-mass star at the boundary between stars and brown dwarfs.
Link to Original Source
Android

GasBuddy Has a New Privacy Policy (Spoiler: Not As Customer Friendly) 72 72

An anonymous reader writes: GasBuddy has been a popular iOS and Android app for the last 5 years used to find the cheapest place to get gas. According to the Google Play store, there are over 10 million installs (in additions to the installs from Apple and Amazon's appstores). Now that they have a large enough number of users, GasBuddy has updated their privacy policy to allow them to collect more information. Some highlights of the privacy policy changes include: only 10 days for new terms to take effect (previously users were given 30 days to review the changes); collection of "signal strength related to Wifi or Bluetooth functionality, temperature, battery level, and similar technical data"; and [a warning that the company] will not honor a web browser's "do not track" setting.

Submission + - GasBuddy has a new privacy policy (SPOILER: Not as customer friendly)

An anonymous reader writes: GasBuddy has been a popular iOS and Android app for the last 5 years to find the cheapest place to get gas. According to Google Play store, there is over 10 million installs (in additions to the installs from Apple and Amazon's appstores). Now that they have a large enough number of users, GasBuddy has updated their privacy policy to allow them to collect more information. Some highlights of the privacy policy changes include only 10 days for new terms to take effect (previously users where given 30 days to review the changes), collection of "signal strength related to Wifi or Bluetooth functionality, temperature, battery level, and similar technical data" and they will not honor a web browser's "do not track" setting.
Communications

Questioning the Dispute Over Key Escrow 56 56

Nicola Hahn writes: The topic of key escrow encryption has once again taken center stage as former Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff has spoken out against key escrow both at this year's Aspen Security Forum and in an op-ed published recently by the Washington Post. However, the debate over cryptographic back doors has a glaring blind spot. As the trove of leaks from Hacking Team highlights, most back doors are implemented using zero-day exploits. Keep in mind that the Snowden documents reveal cooperation across the tech industry, on behalf of the NSA, to make products that were "exploitable." Hence, there are people who suggest the whole discussion over key escrow includes an element of theater. Is it, among other things, a public relations gambit, in the wake of the PRISM scandal, intended to cast Silicon Valley companies as defenders of privacy?

Submission + - Questioning The Dispute over Key Escrow ->

Nicola Hahn writes: "The topic of key escrow encryption has once again taken center stage as former Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff has spoken out against key escrow both at this year’s Aspen Security Forum and in an op-ed published recently by the Washington Post. However the debate over cryptographic back doors has a glaring blind spot. As the trove of leaks from Hacking Team highlights, most back doors are implemented using zero-day exploits. Keep in mind that the Snowden documents reveal cooperation across the tech industry, on behalf of the NSA, to make products that were "exploitable". Hence, there are people who question whether the whole discussion over key escrow includes an element of theater. Is it, among other things, a public relations gambit, in the wake of the PRISM scandal, intended to cast Silicon Valley companies as defenders of privacy?"
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Feed Techdirt: Freedom Of The Press Foundation Sues DOJ Over Its Secret Rules For Spying On Journalists->

The wonderful Freedom of the Press Foundation is now suing the US Justice Department for refusing to reveal its rules and procedures for spying on journalists. You can read the complaint here. The key issue: what rules and oversight exist for the DOJ when it comes to spying on journalists. As you may recall, a few years ago, it came out that the DOJ had been using some fairly sneaky tricks to spy on journalists, including falsely telling a court that reporter James Rosen was a "co-conspirator" in order to get access to his emails and phone records. In response to a lot of criticism, the DOJ agreed to "revise" its rules for when it snoops on journalists.

However, there was an important limitation on the "new" rules, as the NY Times noted at the time:

There is no change to how the F.B.I. may obtain reporters’ calling records via “national security letters,” which are exempt from the regular guidelines. A Justice spokesman said the device is 'subject to an extensive oversight regime.'
Extensive oversight regime, eh? The Freedom of the Press Foundation sought to find out just what kind of extensive oversight there really was -- and came up against a brick wall in the form of black redaction ink: That's from the DOJ's Inspector General report, concerning a situation where the FBI had used an NSL to access a journalist's communications inappropriately. As the Freedom of the Press Foundation notes, elsewhere in that same report, it appears that the FBI is actually ignoring recommendations of the Inspector General concerning these situations, despite the "First Amendment interests implicated." As the Foundation notes, the redactions here make the details entirely opaque, and the Inspector General's Office has made it clear that it disagreed with the redactions, saying that revealing the information behind that black ink "is important to the public's understanding of the FBI's compliance with NSL requirements." Given that the Foundation is now suing to find out those details. The lawsuit specifically requests that the DOJ reveal those documents in their entirety, which includes the "extensive regime, rules, guidelines, or infrastructure that oversees the issuance of NSLs or exigent letters to obtain records regarding a member of the media" as well as "the current procedures that FBI agents must undertake in advance of issuing a NSL or exigent letter to obtain records regarding any member of the media."

I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that the DOJ will reply, hysterically, that revealing this kind of information will put national security at risk and could reveal important law enforcement gathering techniques that will aid those out to harm us or some such crap. Perhaps they'll even toss in a request to dump the entire case for reasons of "national security." Just recognize that this is all busllshit. The request here is not for any details that are going to help any criminals get away with anything. All it is asking for is what process the FBI uses to make sure that it's not violating the First Amendment in spying on journalists. If that's something that needs to be kept secret, there can be only one reason: because the FBI is embarrassed by what it's doing in spying on journalists.

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