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+ - Airbus chating on competition in cross-channel e-flight challenge

An anonymous reader writes: Aerospace giant Airbus has been accused of 'bad sportsmanship' after squashing the ambitions of light aircraft maker Pipistrel to be the first to fly an electric aircraft across the English Channel.
After Pipistrel acquired flight permissions, the German electronics company Siemens which supplies the electric motor used in the Pipistrel Alpha Electro contacted Pipistrel to say they could not use the motor over water (partly German).

+ - Robots in the rough: Pictures and videos from demo day at FSR Toronto->

Hallie Siegel writes: This June the world’s top experts on field and service robotics met at the bi-annual Field and Service Robotics (FSR) conference, hosted this year by the University of Toronto. We went up to the UTIAS lab for Demo Day to get a first hand look at some of the robot research platforms being developed there, and at Waterloo, and MDA Robotics. Some nice pics and video demos of a tethered robot climbing walls, an autonomous RUV driving through tall grasses, a robust controller for quadrotors, a hexcopter with a multi-camera system that constructs maps, and even an autonomous test car.
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Security

'Severe Bug' To Be Patched In OpenSSL 3 3

An anonymous reader writes: The Register reports that upcoming OpenSSL versions 1.0.2d and 1.0.1p are claimed to fix a single security defect classified as "high" severity. It is not yet known what this mysterious vulnerability is — that would give the game away to attackers hoping to exploit the hole before the patch is released to the public. Some OpenSSL's examples of "high severity" vulnerabilities are a server denial-of-service, a significant leak of server memory, and remote code execution. If you are a system administrator, get ready to patch your systems this week. The defect does not affect the 1.0.0 or 0.9.8 versions of the library.

+ - 'Severe Bug' To Be Patched In OpenSSL

An anonymous reader writes: The Register reports that upcoming OpenSSL versions 1.0.2d and 1.0.1p are claimed to fix a single security defect classified as "high" severity. It is not yet known what this mysterious vulnerability is — that would give the game away to attackers hoping to exploit the hole before the patch is released to the public. Some OpenSSL's examples of "high severity" vulnerabilities are a server denial-of-service, a significant leak of server memory, and remote code execution. If you are a system administrator, get ready to patch your systems this week. The defect does not affect the 1.0.0 or 0.9.8 versions of the library.

+ - Nvidia Hopes To Sell More Chips By Bringing AI Programming To The Masses->

jfruh writes: Artificial intelligence typically requires heavy computing power, which can only help manufacturers of specialized chip manufacturers like Nvidia. That's why the company is pushing its Digits software, which helps users design and experiment with neural networks. Version 2 of digits moves out of the command line and comes with a GUI interface in an attempt to move interest beyond the current academic market; it also makes programming for multichip configurations possible.
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+ - Samsung Can't Make Galaxy S6 Phones Fast Enough->

jfruh writes: Samsung's profits were below expectations, but to look on the bright side, the reason is one that many companies want to have: so many people want to buy Galaxy S6 phones that the company can't make them fast enough to meet demand. The phone features curved glass that is tricky to manufacture.
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+ - Pressure mounts on Google to extend Right to Be Forgotten to US->

Mark Wilson writes: The Right To Be Forgotten has proved controversial. A little over a year ago Google was told by a European court that it should accept requests to remove from search results pages that are "inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant". Now, calls for the scheme to be extended to the US are growing ever-louder.

Consumer Watchdog not only says that the Right To Be Forgotten should be brought to the US, but also that Google's refusal to do so is an "unfair and deceptive" business practice. The consumer group is writing to the Federal Trade Commission calling for the search giant to be investigated and forced to consider the removal of certain search results. As has been proved in Europe, it's something that is not without controversy.

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+ - World's First Road-Ready Line of 3D Printed Cars Unveiled Today by Local Motors->

ErnieKey writes: Phoenix-based Local Motors 3D printed their first Strati car last September, and has been going strong since, announcing the Project [Redacted] design challenge in June seeking input from their co-creation community for a road-ready 3D printed car design. A panel of judges reviewed more than 60 entries, and this morning the winners were announced, with Oregon-based Kevin Lo taking the Grand Prize for his design, a customizable vehicle called the Reload Redacted — Swim and Sport. The modular design includes both the 'Swim' and the 'Sport' body types, and both allow for customization and repair via snap modularity.
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+ - How Light Is Too Light For A Laptop? Lenovo LaVie Z Breaks 2 LB Barrier->

MojoKid writes: Ultralight notebooks or "ultrabooks" have become the norm, with the demand for thinner and lighter frames that are still capable of delivering full-featured notebook performance. With the advent of solid state storage and faster, lower-powered processors that require less complex cooling solutions, the average mainstream notebook is rather svelte. Recently, however, Lenovo announced their LaVie Z and LaVie Z 360 ultrabooks and at 1.87 and 2.04 pounds respectively, they're almost ridiculously light. Further, with Core i7 mobile processors and fast SSDs on board, these machines perform impressively well in the benchmarks and real world usage. If you actually pick one up though, both models are so light they feel almost empty, like there's nothing inside. Lenovo achieved this in part by utilizing a magnesium--lithium composite material for the casing of the machines. Though they're incredibly light, the feeling is almost too light, such that they tend to feel a little cheap or flimsy. With a tablet, you come to expect a super thin and light experience and when holding them in one hand, the light weight is an advantage. However, banging on a full-up notebook keyboard deck is a different ball of wax. Which begs the question: Are ultrabooks getting too light? Microsoft's Surface 3 is 1.37 pounds, but it's a tablet doubling as a notebook (a 2-in-1 device). What about full-up business or consumer class notebooks? Do they really need to be that light?
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Communications

Switzerland Begins Trials of Expensive Postal Drones 11 11

An anonymous reader writes: Swiss Post has beat Amazon, Alibaba and other researchers into drone-based delivery by launching practical drops using a Matternet four-rotored drone this month. However the company says that five years of testing and negotiation with regulators lie ahead before it will be able to offer a commercial drone-based delivery service. Like Google's Project Wing, the Matternet drone in question is mooted as a potential lifeline in post-disaster situations, but from a business point of view the release notes its potential for 'express delivery of goods' — a further indicator that the future of postal drone delivery may be an exclusive and expensive one.

+ - Switzerland begins trials of postal drones->

An anonymous reader writes: Swiss Post has beat Amazon, Alibaba and other researchers into drone-based delivery by launching practical drops using a Matternet four-rotored drone this month. However the company says [ https://www.post.ch/en/about-u... ] that five years of testing and negotiation with regulators lie ahead before it will be able to offer a commercial drone-based delivery service. Like Google's Project Wing [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRTNvWcx9Oo], the Matternet drone in question is mooted as a potential lifeline in post-disaster situations, but from a business point of view the release notes its potential for 'express delivery of goods' — a further indicator that the future of postal drone delivery may be an exclusive and expensive one.
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Security

Crypto Experts Blast Gov't Backdoors For Encryption 31 31

loid_void writes with a link to a New York Times report about some of the world's best-known cryptography experts, who have prepared a report which concludes that there is no viable technical solution which "would allow the American and British governments to gain "exceptional access" to encrypted communications without putting the world's most confidential data and critical infrastructure in danger." From the article: [T]he government’s plans could affect the technology used to lock financial institutions and medical data, and poke a hole in mobile devices and the countless other critical systems — including pipelines, nuclear facilities, the power grid — that are moving online rapidly. ... “The problems now are much worse than they were in 1997,” said Peter G. Neumann, a co-author of both the 1997 report and the new paper, who is a computer security pioneer at SRI International, the Silicon Valley research laboratory. “There are more vulnerabilities than ever, more ways to exploit them than ever, and now the government wants to dumb everything down further.” The authors include Neumann, Harold Abelson, Susan Landau, and Bruce Schneier.

+ - Code Specialists Oppose U.S. and British Government Access to Encrypted Communic->

loid_void writes: SAN FRANCISCO â" An elite group of code makers and code breakers is taking American and British intelligence and law enforcement agencies to task in a new paper that evaluates government proposals to maintain special access to encrypted digital communications.

On Tuesday, the group â" 13 of the worldâ(TM)s pre-eminent cryptographers, computer scientists and security specialists â" will release the paper, which concludes there is no viable technical solution that would allow the American and British governments to gain âoeexceptional accessâ to encrypted communications without putting the worldâ(TM)s most confidential data and critical infrastructure in danger.

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Google News Sci Tech: BBC reveals Micro:bit, a programmable PC that fits in your pocket - PCWorld->


PCWorld

BBC reveals Micro:bit, a programmable PC that fits in your pocket
PCWorld
The BBC is getting into the hardware hacking craze with its second device aimed at school age children in the last 34 years. The British broadcaster recently unveiled the Micro:bit, a mini-programmable computer meant to teach children how to code and...
Micro Bit - questions and answersBBC News
The Micro:bit Is Shaping Up To Be The Perfect Programming Device For KidsTechCrunch
BBC teams with ARM, Microsoft and Samsung to launch Micro:bit and get kids ... Inquirer
The Register-Irish Examiner-The Guardian
all 77 news articles

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Communications

The IT Containers That Went To War 39 39

1sockchuck writes: Parachuting a container full of IT gear into a war zone is challenging enough. In the mountains of Afghanistan, helicopters had to deliver modular data centers in three minutes or less, lest the choppers be targeted by Taliban rockets. UK vendor Cannon recently spoke with DataCenterDynamics, sharing some of the extreme challenges and lessons learned from deploying portable data centers for military units in deserts and mountains. The same lessons (except, hopefully, with a lower chance of being shot) would apply in lots of other extreme enviroments, too.

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