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Submission + - Here's how to bypass the iOS lock screen passcode (betanews.com)

Mark Wilson writes: There are numerous ways to keep your smartphone safe from prying eyes, and a lock screen protected with a passcode is a popular choice. But a newly discovered vulnerability in iOS 8 and iOS 9 means that iPhones and iPads could be accessed by attackers.

The vulnerability was discovered by security analyst Benjamin Kunz Mejri and it has been assigned a Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) count of 6.0, as well as a 'high' severity rating. Apple has been aware of the issue since late last year, but has yet to issue a patch. Full instructions are provided.

Submission + - Failed software upgrade halts transit service

linuxwrangler writes: San Francisco Bay Area commuters awoke this morning to the news that BART, the major regional transit system which carries hundreds of thousands of daily riders, was entirely shut down due to a computer failure. Commuters stood stranded at stations and traffic backed up as residents took to the roads. The system has returned to service and BART says the outage resulted from a botched software upgrade.

Submission + - John Carmack Leaves id Software

jones_supa writes: John Carmack has left id Software completely. 'John Carmack, who has become interested in focusing on things other than game development at id, has resigned from the studio,' id's studio director Tim Willits told IGN, and continues: 'John’s work on id Tech 5 and the technology for the current development work at id is complete, and his departure will not affect any current projects. We are fortunate to have a brilliant group of programmers at id who worked with John and will carry on id’s tradition of making great games with cutting-edge technology. As colleagues of John for many years, we wish him well.' Carmack, a co-founder of id, recently joined Oculus VR as Chief Technology Officer, and at the time remained at id Software in some capacity. Earlier this year, id president Todd Hollenshead departed id as well.
Education

Submission + - HARVARD suggests move to open-access journals. (harvard.edu) 1

microcars writes: Harvard has a announced to faculty: "We write to communicate an untenable situation facing the Harvard Library. Many large journal publishers have made the scholarly communication environment fiscally unsustainable and academically restrictive. This situation is exacerbated by efforts of certain publishers (called “providers”) to acquire, bundle, and increase the pricing on journals."
The memo goes on to describe the situation in more detail and suggests options to faculty and students for the future that includes submitting articles to open-access journals. If Harvard paves the way with this, how long until other academic bodies follow suit and cut off companies such as Elsevier?

Space

Submission + - Companies plan to mine precious metals on asteroids, moon (tech-stew.com)

techfun89 writes: "Two start-up companies are attempting to enter the science realm as well as make a business and entertainment out of the idea that these sources in space can be mined and brought back to Earth for use in cell phones and other electronics as well as other space missions.

Planetary Resources, with such names as James Cameron and Google executives Larry Page and Eric Schmidt will hold a press conference today at 1:30 p.m. ET to announce what it calls a "new space venture with a mission to help ensure humanity's prosperity."

According to company co-founder Peter Diamandis, it has been estimated that a single 100-foot-long asteroid could contain $25 billion to $50 billion in platinum. Of the nearly 8,900 known near-Earth Asteroids, about 100 or 150 are water-rich and actually easier to reach than the surface of the moon.

The first task for the Bellevue, Washington Planetary Resources will be putting a telescope into Earth orbit within two years to survey near-Earth asteroids that contain precious metals and water. Within four years, mining could begin on the objects according to company co-founder Eric Anderson. Mining operations would be enabled with groups of unmanned spacecraft.

Another company, Moon Express of Mountain View, California said they have recruited five top lunar scientists to join its board to make plans to mine metals on the moon.

Due to the asteroids striking the moon throughout time, there are deposits of heavy metals on the surface of the moon."

Submission + - C/C++ Most Popular Again?

Drethon writes: On this day in 2008 a submission was posted that C/C++ was loosing ground so I decided to check out its current state. It seems that C has returned to the top while Java has dropped by the same amount, VB and PHP have dropped drastically, C++ is holding fast but now in third place and Objective-C and C# have climbed quite a bit.

2008 data thanks to SatanicPuppy:

1. Java.....20.5%
2. C........14.7%
3. VB.......11.6%
4. PHP......10.3%
5. C++.......9.9%
6. Perl......5.9%
7. Python....4.5%
8. C#........3.8%
9. Ruby......2.9%
10. Delphi...2.7%

The other 10 in the top 20 are:
JavaScript, D, PL/SQL, SAS, Pascal, Lisp/Scheme, FoxPro/xBase, COBOL, Ada, and ColdFusion

Submission + - When did Irene stop being a hurricane? (blogspot.com)

jamesl writes: Cliff Mass, a climate researcher at the University of Washington and popular Seattle blogger asks, "When did Irene stop being a hurricane?"

" ... there is really no reliable evidence of hurricane-force winds at any time the storm was approaching North Carolina or moving up the East Coast."

"I took a look at all the observations over Virgina, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, and New York. Not one National Weather Service or FAA observation location, not one buoy observations, none reach the requisite wind speed. Most were not even close."

"Surely, one of the observations upwind of landfall, over Cape Hatteras or one of the other barrier island locations, indicated hurricane-force sustained winds? Amazingly, the answer is still no."

Cliff supports his statement with data from NOAA/NWS/NDBC presented in easy to understand charts.

Submission + - Fake certificate for *.google.com in Iran (pastebin.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Dutch CA DigiNotar has issued a certificate for *.google.com (which was revoked a few hours ago), that some Iranian ISPs used to do SSL MITM.
Iphone

Submission + - Sniffer Hijacks SSL Traffic From Unpatched iPhones (computerworld.com)

CWmike writes: "Almost anyone can snoop the secure data traffic of unpatched iPhones and iPads using a recently-revised nine-year-old tool, a researcher said as he urged owners to apply Apple's latest iOS fix. If iOS devices aren't patched, attackers can easily intercept and decrypt secure traffic — the kind guarded by SSL, which is used by banks, e-tailers and other sites — at a public Wi-Fi hotspot, said Chet Wisniewski, a security researcher with Sophos. 'This is a nine-year-old bug that Moxie Marlinspike disclosed in 2002,' Wisniewski told Computerworld on Wednesday. On Monday, Marlinspike released an easier-to-use revision of his long-available 'sslsniff' traffic sniffing tool. 'My mother could actually use this,' he said."
Medicine

Submission + - Look-Alike Tubes Are Killing Hospital Patients (nytimes.com) 1

Hugh Pickens writes: "The NY Times reports that in hospitals around the country nurses connect and disconnect interchangeable clear plastic tubing sticking out of patients' bodies to deliver or extract medicine, nutrition, fluids, gases or blood — sometimes with deadly consequences. Tubes intended to inflate blood-pressure cuffs have been connected to intravenous lines leading to deadly air embolisms., intravenous fluids have been connected to tubes intended to deliver oxygen leading to suffocation, and in 2006 a nurse at in Wisconsin mistakenly put a spinal anesthetic into a vein, killing 16-year-old who was giving birth. "Nurses should not have to work in an environment where it is even possible to make that kind of mistake," says Nancy Pratt, a vocal advocate for changing the system. Critics say the tubing problem, which has gone on for decades, is an example of how the FDA fails to protect the public. "FDA could fix this tubing problem tomorrow, but because the agency is so worried about making industry happy, people continue to die," says Dr. Robert Smith."
Government

Why Recordings From World War I Aren't Public Domain 329

An anonymous reader writes "While Disney and others have done a great job pushing the end date for works entering the public domain ever further forward, most people have assumed that anything from before 1923 is in the public domain. However, it turns out that this is not true for sound recordings, in part due to an accidental quirk in copyright law history — in that Congress, way back in 1909, believed that sound recordings could not be covered by copyright (they believed the Constitution did not allow recordings to be covered), and thus, some state laws stepped up to create special copyrights for sound recordings. A court ruling then said that these state rules were not overruled by federal copyright law. End result? ANY recorded work from before 1972 (no matter how early it was recorded) won't go into the public domain until 2049 at the earliest."

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