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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 6 declined, 2 accepted (8 total, 25.00% accepted)

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Submission + - Houston GT Program Biased Against Blacks and Latinos (npr.org)

tiberus writes: Fernando Aguilar named his only son after his hero, Isaac Newton. When Isaac was tested for the GT program, he didn't qualify. Houston's enrollment statistics indicate that Hispanic and Black students would more likely be identified as GT if they were White or Asian, which is a trend across the country.

Aguilar is stretched thin between his job building servers for a software company and finishing his college degree in statistics. So, getting to spend time alone with Isaac is really special, but finding time to get involved with his son's school is difficult. Aguilar knows the gifted and talented program exists at Herrera Elementary, though he wasn't aware the school was testing Isaac.

Houston school leaders asked Donna Ford, of Vanderbilt University, to examine enrollment in the program, and she gave it a failing grade. "Racial bias has to be operating, inequities are rampant. Discrimination does exist whether intentional or unintentional," she told the school board in May of this year. When it comes to Houston's program she says, "I think it's a clear case of segregation, gifted education being segregated by race and income."

Submission + - Dropping the TSA: A Growing Trend (dailysignal.com)

tiberus writes: Amid a growing number of customer service complaints and delays, over a dozen airports have dropped TSA screeners in favor of cheaper and friendlier private screeners.

Tired of long lines at TSA airport checkpoints? Today, the Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB) began a transition to private security screeners rather than Transportation Security Administration (TSA) screeners in a change that promises more efficient security measures.

Submission + - Man walks after nose cells repair spinal cord (medicalnewstoday.com)

tiberus writes: A 40-year-old paralyzed man from Bulgaria can now walk again with the aid of a frame after breakthrough surgery transplanted cells from his nose into his spinal cord, which had been severed in a knife attack.

After undergoing surgery to transplant cells from his nose to his spinal cord, a paralyzed man from Bulgaria is able to walk again. The procedure effectively provided a "bridge" over the injury site so nerve cells — encouraged by the special nose cells — could regrow across the scar tissue.


Submission + - Aurora Borealis Substation Style (examiner.com)

tiberus writes: It's wasn't even 12/21/2012 yet:

So much for the bubble that has often protected our state capital from storms much of this year. It wasn’t the end of the world, but it did scare quite a few people the eve of the Winter Solstice in Annapolis, MD and central Anne Arundel County. A strong storm is moving through with heavy rain and high winds. This is the warmer part of the same system the brought blizzard conditions to the Mid West and even into western Maryland. Even BGE made the public aware they might expect power failures in this event.


Submission + - The Giant Bite - Discovery of Leviathan melvillei (npr.org)

tiberus writes: Christopher Joyce writes:

Rarely do scientists get to publish a research paper that begins with the words "The Giant Bite." On Wednesday, fossil hunters from Europe did just that. They've discovered one of the biggest predators that ever lived: a whale — one that devoured other whales and probably anything else it had an appetite for.

The scientists call the creature Leviathan melvillei. "Leviathan" means sea monster, and "melvillei" refers, of course, to Herman Melville, who wrote the greatest of whale stories, Moby-Dick. Paleontologist Olivier Lambert says he's read that book — several times.

"I love the book," he says. "So, it was the reason why we selected that species name."

Lambert is with the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, and you might call him a modern-day Ahab, though what he's after are the whitened bones of extinct whales. Two years ago in a Peruvian desert, his team found some from a sperm whale that lived and died some 12 to 13 million years ago — when the desert was underwater.


Submission + - Long Distance Remote Access

tiberus writes: How do you support remote users in truly remote locations? We are a small U.S. Company with offices on the East Coast and one in Hawaii. Now we are being asked to provide remote access to e-mail and file services to employees supporting our products in Iraq. Without blackberrys and with slow or high latency connections, how do you support these users? Personal satellite dishes?

Use the Force, Luke.