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Comment Re:Something not quite right (Score 4, Insightful) 933

"Really? Looks to me like they've made their point. Unfortunately, no one really knows what that point is. All I've gotten from them is 'Wah! Rich people have more than we do!' "

Lots of people got the point. They must have paid attention to the news, or maybe to the signs the protesters are carrying. Just because "you" and the "media" you consume are saying "no one really knows what that point is" doesn't actually mean no ones knows what that point is.

Maybe if you repeat it some more.

Comment Re:My question isn't about big corps, but big crim (Score 1) 379

Well I would assume that if the secure boot thing checks the keys of software that runs at boot, there would be some similar key based check done before something was flashed onto UEFI. This of course brings us back to the problem of just how reliable are digitally signed keys?

Another problem I have is that my gaming rig is always a Windows machine, and I'm okay with that. But then about every two years I build a new one, and the old one becomes a Linux machine of some flavor. If the way things shake out I'd have to build two machines to accomplish what I want, instead of just maintaining a machine whose only crime is still being worthwhile as a computer, just not a game machine.

Comment Re:No Assembler? (Score 1) 624

No ASM programming?

Enjoy being useless when you need to work at the bare-metal level.

Also, enjoy being dog-ass slow and having boated code.

For a perfect example of why ASM rocks, see MenuetOS.

In everyone's defense, the question asked wasn't about languages, but about books. I can't (and this isn't surprising) think of any legendary ASM programming books. I am currently enjoying trying to work my way through Assembly Language Step-by-Step: Programming with Linux, Third Edition by Jeff Duntemann.

If you want to, please reply with other good ones I should check out.

Comment Re:rest of the reaction (Score 1) 311

No, it wouldn't. I'm not a physicist (or fond of trite acronyms), but I don't think that a handful of particles resuming a state they once held would be destructive. For that to happen, ALL of the particles would have to resume that state. The LHC is pretty cool, but I don't think it's strong enough to turn the clock back on all the matter in the universe.

Google

Submission + - Google Earth to get a Second Life?

An anonymous reader writes: Rumors are circulating that the search giant is planning to build its own virtual world based on Google Earth. And it's not as crazy as it sounds, with the latest version of Google Earth having added the ability to build and share rich 3D content using the company's SketchUp 3D modeling software. Meanwhile a second rumor doing the rounds is that the search giant has aquired game advertiser Adscape. With Google's real mission to organize the world around advertising, a virtual world would of its own would make sense.

"The Avis WIZARD decides if you get to drive a car. Your head won't touch the pillow of a Sheraton unless their computer says it's okay." -- Arthur Miller

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