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Biotech

Fear Detector To Sniff Out Terrorists 342

Posted by timothy
from the interesting-assumptions dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "Evidence that the smell of fear is real was uncovered by US scientists last year who studied the underarm secretions of 20 terrified novice skydivers and found that people appear to respond unconsciously to the sweat smell of a frightened person. Now the Telegraph reports that researchers hope a 'fear detector' will make it possible to identify individuals at check points who are up to no good. 'The challenge lies in the characterization and identification of the specific chemical that gives away the signature of human fear, especially the fear in relation to criminal acts,' says Professor Tong Tun at City University London, who leads the team developing security sensor systems that can detect the human fear pheromone. The project will look at potential obstacles to the device, such as the effects of perfume and the variances in pheromone production and if the initial 18-month feasibility study is successful, the first detectors could be developed in the next two to three years. 'I do not see any particular reason why similar sensor techniques cannot be expanded to identify human smells by race, age or gender to build a profile of a criminal during or after an incident,' Tong added."

Comment: Re:But how exactly does it work? (Score 3, Insightful) 140

by threeturn (#27586565) Attached to: Amazon To Block Phorm Scans
Technical explanation in some detail

Q Why is it an opt-out system?
A Because they couldn't get away with providing no optionality control, so they went for the option which pushed as many users as possible to their system.

Q When did I or Slashdot give implied consent to anyone to inspect the packets for reasons other than routing?
A You didn't, but Phorm and the spineless UK government has decided you did.

Q What data do they collect and what do they do with it?
A Browsing habits to produce targeted advertising.

Government

Timetable App Developer Gets Nastygram From Transit Sydney 378

Posted by timothy
from the didn't-get-the-gift-horse-memo dept.
mikesd81 writes "ZDNet Australia writes that NSW state corporation RailCorp has threatened a Sydney software developer with legal action if he fails to withdraw a train timetable application that is currently the second-most-popular application in its category in Apple's App Store. Alvin Singh created Transit Sydney after he began teaching himself how to program in Cocoa Mobile. Within days of its Feb 18 release, Singh received a cease and desist notice from Rail Corporation NSW, the government body that administers Sydney's CityRail network. The email states: 'I advise that copyright in all CityRail timetables is owned by RailCorp. ... Any use of these timetables in a manner which breaches copyright by a third party can only occur through the grant of a suitable licence by RailCorp.'"
The Internet

+ - What's your "hompage"?

Submitted by threeturn
threeturn (622824) writes "My "homepage" is:
1) Google
2) Yahoo!
3) MSN
4) A social network site
5) about:blank
6) Hijacked by a toolbar
7) Other — specify..."

Comment: KGB or Spotty Teenagers? (Score 4, Insightful) 270

by threeturn (#25916171) Attached to: Significant Russian Attack On US Military Networks

I love the way these things are always spun as if they are significant military attacks coordinate by the foreign government or their agents. Is there any evidence that it isn't just a few bored teenagers who happen to live in Russia and think it would be fun to try and hack the US DOD?

Security

Lenovo Service Disables Laptops With a Text Message 257

Posted by kdawson
from the say-the-magic-word dept.
narramissic writes "Lenovo plans to announce on Tuesday a service that allows users to remotely disable a PC by sending a text message. A user can send the command from a specified cell phone number — each ThinkPad can be paired with up to 10 cell phones — to kill a PC. The software will be available free from Lenovo's Web site. It will also be available on certain ThinkPad notebooks equipped with mobile broadband starting in the first half of 2009. 'You steal my PC and ... if I can deliver a signal to that PC that turns it off, hey, I'm good now,' said Stacy Cannady, product manager of security at Lenovo. 'The limitation here is that you have to have a WAN card in the PC and you must be paying a data plan for it,' Cannady added."

If money can't buy happiness, I guess you'll just have to rent it.

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