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Music

+ - Emotional Bag Check: Music for Sad Strangers->

Submitted by thib_gc
thib_gc (730259) writes "Wired is running a piece on Emotional Bag Check, which lets you post about your problems when you're sad and suggest a song to cheer up sad strangers when you're happy. From the article: "Once you’ve shared a song with someone, you get access to the stats, which show that among the most popular songs to be recommended are Jimmy Eat World, Coldplay, James Blunt, and Maroon 5." The site is using Grooveshark to deliver music."
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Open Source

+ - SourceForge Launches Web Redesign During Outage->

Submitted by thib_gc
thib_gc (730259) writes "SourceForge, whose services have been partially crippled for two weeks after an intrusion previously discussed on Slashdot, surprised thousands of developers eagerly awaiting the end of the protracted outage of CVS with an e-mail announcing the immediate launch of a "shiny new look". The announcement boasts that "The use of HTML5/CSS3 has played a huge role in both the visual appearance and enabling performance improvements", in contrast with the exploit disclosure which pledged that "Our immediate priorities are to prevent further exposure and ensure data integrity. We have all hands on deck working on identifying the exploit vector or vectors, eliminating them, and restoring the impacted services." (SourceForge and Slashdot are both part of Geeknet, Inc.)"
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Biotech

+ - Cancer resembles life 1 billion years ago-> 4

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "What is cancer? It's not an invader, it's spawned from our own bodies. And it bears striking resemblance to early multicellular life from 1 billion years ago. This has led astrobiologists and cosmologists Paul Davies and Charlie Lineweaver to suggest that cancer is driven by primitive genes that govern cellular cooperation, and which kick in when our more recently evolved genes that keep them in check break down. So, far from being rogue cells that mutate out of control, cancers are actually cells that revert to a more ancient level of programming, like booting in Safe Mode. The good news is this means cancers have only finite variation. Once we nut out the ancient genes, we'll know how it works, and it's unlike to evolve any new defence mechanisms, meaning curing cancer might be not quite as mammoth a task as commonly thought."
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It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Male Science Students Least Sexually Active

Submitted by Thib
Thib (730259) writes "A study at the University of Sydney published in the Journal Sexual Health and featured not without humor by PhysOrg confirms it: "Female arts students at university are the most sexually active while male science students are the most likely to be virgins", a conclusion which I'm sure will come as no surprise to Slashdotters worldwide. The study was actually about chlamydia awareness among university students aged 18 to 25."
The Internet

+ - Teens Protecting Their Online Profiles

Submitted by Thib
Thib (730259) writes "A study from the Pew Internet and American Life Project reveals that the majority of teens pay attention to what they are exposing about themselves in their online profiles on social networking communities like Facebook. For instance, while many routinely use their first name or include a picture, 'fewer than a third of teens with profiles use their last names, and a similar number include their e-mail addresses. Only 2 percent list their cell phone numbers.' The study comes among growing think-of-the-children brouhaha in state legislatures about the dangers of online predators. From the article: 'According to Pew, 45 percent of online teens do not have profiles at all, a figure that contradicts widespread perceptions that the nation's youths are continually on MySpace.'"
Bug

Journal: OpenBSD's second remote hole in the default installation

Journal by Alioth

The OpenBSD project has just issued an advisory (and updated its website to reflect the change) that it now has its second remote root vulnerability in more than ten years. The exploit itself is performed with a specially crafted IPv6 ICMP packet, and is caused by a bug in the mbuf chains in the operating system kernel. The OpenBSD team have released a patch. The bug affects all versions of OpenBSD. Since

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