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Comment: Re:No... (Score 1) 116

by thetartanavenger (#37805880) Attached to: Tipping Point For Open Access CS Research?

It would be nice to see articles out from behind the IEEE and ACM paywalls, though.

Many articles available on ACM are actually availble elsewhere outside of the paywalls. Every publication I've ever made is on both ACM behind the paywall and my personal site and uni sites for free. I personally just google the name of what I want to read and it often turns up somewhere for free (legitimately). Not ideal though I know.

As mentioned by someone else, ACM has now started a linking service effectively allowing free publication through ACM. Haven't got round to sorting it for my stuff yet, but looks like it's what is wanted for people like me.

Comment: Re:Me too! (Score 2) 172

by thetartanavenger (#37582960) Attached to: Google Opens First Retail Outlet In London

AltaVista: we do search!

Google: We do search that gives better results based on what the person actually wants. It includes a calculator, knowledge engine, currency converter and many more little features you'll take for granted all in one.

Hotmail: we do online mail

Google: We do online mail with quite a nice interface that includes chat features integrated into it, along with a labs section to fiddle with stuff. We give a lot more space for free. We are even trying to innovate with the use of priority inbox's and other features that didn't exist before. You don't have to use them if you don't want to though.

Nokia: We do smartphones
Apple: we do too, and added touch and apps

Google: We do smartphones that are open and customisable. You have a variety of hardware to choose from that suits you, and pretty safe ecosystem if you want that and a way to install other stuff too. We introduced desktop widgets and a few other useful features, although we probably weren't the ones to do them first, people seem to like them none the less. All this and funky integration with our other services.

Sun: We do Java

Microsoft: We do Java too!!
Court + Sun: No you don't you do something different
Google: We do Android SDK that runs in a virtual machine using Dalvik bytecode. Oracle claims we violate their patents, which remains to be seen.

Everyone: We do instant messaging

Google: Me too! See email. Our chat happily and easily runs in browser and using a variety of clients, includes video and voice chat and phonecalls. Yeah others do it too, but are they as convenient if you're already using gmail?

Facebook: We do social

Google: We do social too. We've tried it before and fucked it up. That taught us to give people what they want instead, and make it easy for people to lock down their profile, send messages to only those they want and generally try to respect their privacy (from an outside perspective. We do use your data, but it's free and we're an advertising company so what do you expect? Do you think facebook doesn't?)

Sony/Apple: We do brand-specific shops
MS & now Google: me too!

You've got me on this one...

Wow this really makes me sound like a google lover, heck maybe I am. But don't criticise them for making services that in many ways appear to be better than the alternatives in some but not all ways. Remember, you don't have to use them..

Comment: Re:Yes schools should come up with their own polic (Score 1) 102

by thetartanavenger (#37340998) Attached to: Missouri Hedges On 'Teachers Can't Friend Students' Law

It's a bad thing if teachers have a Facebook account they use to buddy with their students simply to share pictures, schmooze, gossip and otherwise engage in behavior that is unbecoming a teacher.

Ummm, why? There is nothing wrong with teachers being friends with their students and doing anything a normal human being would do (within the law and school policy obviously). If they abused it by taking advantage of their position of power, or something else then yeah, it's a bad thing, but I was friends with some of my teachers when I was younger. I did gossip with them, and sometimes see or show holiday pics and things, and these were the teachers I went to when I needed advice, for example when I couldn't ask my parents. Just because some fucker decides to abuse a system doesn't mean I should be punished for it.

Comment: Re:hoist by their own petard (Score 1) 381

by thetartanavenger (#37279466) Attached to: Apple Claims Samsung and Motorola Patent Monopoly

It's going to take a long time before Apple realizes they can't win this legal battle and they should have just kept competing in the marketplace instead.

Apple have already won, that's why they do it. It won't be a long time before they realise they can't win, they know they can't win the lawsuit but in playing this game they're holding back everyone long enough so that they can make a tiny improvement and claim to have the latest and greatest. If they weren't able to hold everyone back like this people would progress and try to stay ahead of everyone else through actual improvement and innovation, but then they'd have to share a piece of the pie and actually innovate something.

Comment: Re:Result of Truancy Laws (Score 1) 725

by thetartanavenger (#37172074) Attached to: When Schools Are the Police

Granted for most cases this is true, but there are some that cannot be taught in a standard school because of the rules that teachers and administration have to follow. It would be nice if they could get shipped off to military boarding school but people are unwilling to do that now.

Forgive my nitpicking, but would that not be the same as giving them the right support? Ok, so maybe expulsion and finding the right solution that works there is what is necessary, but this is not what the parent was advocating. There is no solution that will work for everyone, it's the job of parents and teachers to find what will work for each child, but expelling them and giving up on them is not going to help, which is what I took the initial poster to be saying.

Comment: Re:Result of Truancy Laws (Score 1, Insightful) 725

by thetartanavenger (#37170402) Attached to: When Schools Are the Police

You cannot teach someone when they are not willing to learn.

Bullshit. You just have to find the right way. Give them the right support.

If a child doesn't want to learn they should be expelled from school and given working papers.

Oh brilliant. Kids act out for a variety of reasons, none of which deserves to get them expelled. Expelling them shows them that you, and hence the world, has given up on them. You may as well just wait until they are old enough and their disruptions are bad enough that you can lock them up and throw away the key!

Why punish those that are there to learn with disruptive people?

Because they're kids. Everybody needs to learn how to deal with assholes. And assholes need to learn how to deal with people.

Comment: Re:This is Canadian. (Score 1) 142

by thetartanavenger (#37082280) Attached to: Canadian Judge Rules Domain Names Are Property

In Britain, (but not Scotland) there is a "right to ramble", to walk over undeveloped, uncultivated private land.

You make it sound as if Scotland does not have these rights, however this is not the case. Instead, here in Scotland we have a complete "right to roam", far less restrictive than that of England and Wales. I believe the main difference is we can be on any land for a variety of purposes instead of just certain types of land like moorland and coastal land.

I realise this does not necessarily affect the point you were making, I just thought it should be pointed out.

Sources: Me (An Englishman living in Scotland) and wikipedia

Comment: Re:Crossley declaired bankrupt (Score 1) 199

by thetartanavenger (#36380180) Attached to: Judge Prevents 23,322 Filesharing Does From Being Sued For Now

Blackmailing filesharers didn't turn out to be the money-spinner he anticipated it to be...

I'm not sure I agree. From your link:

Andrew Crossley continued to reside in a £700,000 home with a Bentley in the driveway.

Just another slimy conman working the system.

Comment: Where do I get a refund? (Score 1) 190

by thetartanavenger (#36286546) Attached to: Google Yanks Several Emulators From App Store

I realise this guy broke software licenses, but I bought these. Now that they're no longer available is Google going to hand out refunds to all those customers who have lost access to their software?

I'm actually not really bothered given I bought them ages ago, I just thought it was an interesting question of what happens when Google pulls something.

Comment: Re:YES!!! This is why the android bugs me so much! (Score 1) 254

You DO NOT need to close applications in Android. It's handled automagically by the OS.

Unless the app crashes, locks up, goes into an infinite loop, decides to be designed badly so that the only way you can get back to a certain stage in the program is to fully restart it (not just go home and then back), etc, etc. Agreed though, Android does a really good job of removing the need to close applications and have task killers etc, but they cannot protect you from crappy programmers in general..

Comment: Re:Safari browser exploits (Score 1) 370

by thetartanavenger (#36212416) Attached to: Why You Shouldn't Panic Over Mac Malware

The point is that this is not true with this particular piece of malware.

FTFY

If you really think that there are no other exploits that can gain root access or other desired privileges then you are living in a dream world. Whether or not they have been discovered yet is irrelevant. And I can guarantee you that new ones will also be introduced at some point.

If you don't believe me just google "max exploit root" for proof that it has already happened at least once.

Comment: Re:while Apple deserves blame... (Score 4, Insightful) 132

by thetartanavenger (#36087098) Attached to: Apple Discusses iOS Privacy Issues Before Congress

While Apple certainly deserves a lot of blame, so do all the people who purchased their products. It has been clear for ages that their model is one of lockdown and control. If you support that kind of thing financially, you bear some of the responsibility for the direction that our society seems to be going: erosion of personal ownership and transfer of control to multinational corporations.

Those purchasing deserve blame for what exactly. Yes they lock down their devices, so what. Some people want that, others don't which is why we have competition and alternatives like Android. When Apple crossed a line with personal privacy people stood up and complained and it was resolved. Yes there should be more protections in place to prevent this kind of incident, but those purchasing clearly didn't like what happened and Apple was put in its place. If they didn't, /then/ go ahead and transfer the blame, but until then all the consumers have done is purchase a device in a safe ecosystem that they can't break. If you don't like the restrictions then don't buy it..

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