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Submission + - A Band-Aid that could suck bugs out of your wound (

sciencehabit writes: Scientists have made progress towards a band-aid like device that can literally suck bacteria out of wounds. When they placed nanofibers in a petri dish of Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium involved in chronic infection, the bugs quickly attached themselves to 500-nanometer-wide fibers, but hardly onto fibers with larger diameters. When the researchers coated the nanofibers with different compounds and tested them on the bacteria Escherichia coli, also responsible for chronic wounds, the bugs formed bridges on fibers coated with allylamine, a colorless organic compound, but stayed away from fibers coated with acrylic acid. The researchers, who plan to test the meshes on composites that resemble human skin, hope that they will eventually lead to smart wound dressings that could prevent infections. Doctors could stick the nano–Band-Aid on a wound and simply peel it off to get rid of the germs.

Submission + - China triples the targeting range of its submarines with a new cruise missile (

An anonymous reader writes: Depending on how you feel about China’s growing power in the world, you may or may not be impressed to hear that China’s aerospace industry has unveiled a new missile design that triples the range of its submarines.

The Chinese Navy’s existing submarines rely on a cruise missile with a 42km range, however, the brand new CM-708UNA more than triples that to 128km. It achieves the extra distance using a solid rocket booster and turbo engine. On board is a high-precision radar seeker and the ability to link up with a satellite for guidance fine tuning during flight. As for what it can target, both inland structures and sea vessels are fair game.

Submission + - Newly Discovered Asteroid Passing Within Geostationary Orbit Sunday 1

theshowmecanuck writes: A newly found asteroid the size of a house will give earth a close flyby this weekend. It will pass just below satellites in geostationary orbit, and above New Zealand around 14:18 EDT / 18:18 GMT / 06:18 NZST this coming Sunday (Monday morning in NZ).

"Asteroid 2014 RC was initially discovered on the night of August 31 by the Catalina Sky Survey near Tucson, Arizona, and independently detected the next night by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope, located on the summit of Haleakal on Maui, Hawaii," NASA officials said in a statement."

Submission + - Amazing New Invention: A Nail Polish That Detects Date Rape Drugs (

stephendavion writes: Checking to see if your drink has been tampered with is about to get a whole lot more discreet. Thanks to the work of four North Carolina State University undergrads, you’ll soon be able to find out without reaching for a testing tool. That’s because you’ll already have five of them on each hand. The team — Ankesh Madan, Stephen Gray, Tasso Von Windheim, and Tyler Confrey-Maloney — has come up with a creative and unobtrusive way to package chemicals that react when exposed to Rohypnol and GHB. They put it in nail polish that they’re calling Undercover Colors.

Submission + - Analysis Of The War Of 1812 Finds Same Failures That Led To 9/11 (

An anonymous reader writes: io9 reports, "This month is the 200th anniversary of the British capture of Washington, DC, and the torching of the White House. How did this disaster happen, despite ample warnings? A CIA analyst who pored through historical documents blames the same types of intelligence failures that preceded Pearl Harbor and September 11th. ... CIA analyst William Weber addresses this very question in a study published in the most recent issue of Studies In Intelligence. ... Weber's study is sort of an historical version of the "9/11 Commission Report," which pointedly faulted U.S. officials for a "failure of imagination" that kept them from understanding and anticipating the al Qaeda threat. "

Submission + - Unreal Engine 4 Launching With Full Source Code (

jones_supa writes: Unreal Engine 4 from Epic to game developers is launching now. Supported platforms are Windows, OS X, iOS and Android, with desktop Linux coming later. The monetization scheme is unique: anyone can get access to literally everything for a $19/month fee. Epic is working to build a company that succeeds when UE4 developers succeed. Therefore, part of the deal is that anyone can ship a commercial product with UE4 by paying 5% of gross revenue resulting from sales to users, helping the ecosystem. The tools you get are the Unreal Editor in ready-to-run form, and the engine's complete C++ source code hosted on GitHub for collaborative development. Provided also is the foundation for the community: chat in the forums, add to the wiki, participate in the AnswerHub Q&A, and join collaborative development projects via GitHub. The company is also shipping lots of ready-made content, samples, and game templates. So, will this effort succeed? That's up to you and your judgment of the engine’s value. Unreal Engine 4 has been built by a team of over 100 engineers, artists and designers around the world, and this launch 'represents all of Epic's hopes and dreams of how major software can be developed and distributed in the future'.

Submission + - Graphine Condom Proposed By Bill Gates

theshowmecanuck writes: Well it's not exactly carbon fibre, and might not be bullet proof, but scientists at the National Graphene Institute in Manchester are working on blocking another kind of shot. According to the BBC, "The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has awarded scientists $100,000 (£60,000) to create stronger, thinner condoms from the new 'wonder material'." Perhaps they might even provide an enhancement so that you can broadcast some 'getting in the mood' music at the same time?

Submission + - NY Comic Con Takes Over Attendees' Twitter Accounts to Praise Itself (

Okian Warrior writes: Attendees to this year’s New York Comic Con convention were allowed to pre-register their RFID-enabled badges online and connect their social media profiles to their badges — something, the NYCC registration site explained, that would make the “NYCC experience 100x cooler! For realz.”

Most attendees didn’t expect “100x cooler” to translate into “we’ll post spam in your feed as soon as the RFID badge senses that you’ve entered the show", but that seems to be what happened.

Submission + - CPJ Report: The Obama Administration And Press Freedoms (

dryriver writes: Committee To Protect Journalists reports: U.S. President Barack Obama came into office pledging open government, but he has fallen short of his promise. Journalists and transparency advocates say the White House curbs routine disclosure of information and deploys its own media to evade scrutiny by the press. Aggressive prosecution of leakers of classified information and broad electronic surveillance programs deter government sources from speaking to journalists. In the Obama administration’s Washington, government officials are increasingly afraid to talk to the press. Those suspected of discussing with reporters anything that the government has classified as secret are subject to investigation, including lie-detector tests and scrutiny of their telephone and e-mail records. An “Insider Threat Program” being implemented in every government department requires all federal employees to help prevent unauthorized disclosures of information by monitoring the behavior of their colleagues. Six government employees, plus two contractors including Edward Snowden, have been subjects of felony criminal prosecutions since 2009 under the 1917 Espionage Act, accused of leaking classified information to the press—compared with a total of three such prosecutions in all previous U.S. administrations. Still more criminal investigations into leaks are under way. Reporters’ phone logs and e-mails were secretly subpoenaed and seized by the Justice Department in two of the investigations, and a Fox News reporter was accused in an affidavit for one of those subpoenas of being “an aider, abettor and/or conspirator” of an indicted leak defendant, exposing him to possible prosecution for doing his job as a journalist. In another leak case, a New York Times reporter has been ordered to testify against a defendant or go to jail.

Submission + - Syrian Electronic Army Hacks Domain Data for Twitter, NY Times

Trailrunner7 writes: The Syrian Electronic Army, a group known for attacking high-profile media sites in the last year or so, has in the last few hours compromised the domain information for a large number of sites, including the New York Times home page and some of Twitter’s domains. Security researchers say that the most likely attack vector was the domain registrar used by the companies.

Both the Times and Twitter, as well as a long list of other companies including Google and Yahoo, use a company called Melbourne IT as a domain registrar. Researchers following the attack say that the WHOIS and domain information for the Times and Twitter domains was changing back and forth between legitimate data and the hacked SEA data for much of the last few hours. The Times home page was offline sporadically Tuesday afternoon and the paper reported that the company’s CIO told employees to be cautious sending email “until this situation is resolved”.

Submission + - Electrolyzer Discovery Could Boost Use of Fuel Cells

theshowmecanuck writes: (Despite the misleading headline in the article) Researchers at the University of Calgary in Canada have discovered how to make highly efficient electrolyzers using common metals instead of rare earth metals. I think the key quote from the article is this:

Electrolyzers depend on rare, difficult-to-work-with and sometimes toxic metals, but the method developed by Chris Berlinguette and Simon Trudel uses metals as common as rust. It delivers results comparable to current techniques but costs about 1,000 times less.

This seems like it could make the use of fuel cells common place with an economical fuel source. If this pans out, what other hurdles might need addressing to get a fuel cell into every home?

The Internet

Ship Anchor, Not Sabotaging Divers, Possibly Responsible For Outage 43

Nerval's Lobster writes "This week, Egypt caught three men in the process of severing an undersea fiber-optic cable. But Telecom Egypt executive manager Mohammed el-Nawawi told the private TV network CBC that the reason for the region's slowdowns was not the alleged saboteurs — it was damage previously caused by a ship. On March 22, cable provider Seacom reported a cut in its Mediterranean cable connecting Southern and Eastern Africa, the Middle East and Asia to Europe; it later suggested that the most likely cause of the incident was a ship anchor, and that traffic was being routed around the cut, through other providers. But repairs to the cable took longer than expected, with the Seacom CEO announcing March 23 that the physical capability to connect additional capacity to services in Europe was "neither adequate nor stable enough," and that it was competing with other providers. The repairs continued through March 27, after faults were found on the restoration system; that same day, Seacom denied that the outage could have been the work of the Egyptian divers, but said that the true cause won't be known for weeks. 'We think it is unlikely that the damage to our system was caused by sabotage,' the CEO wrote in a statement. 'The reasons for this are the specific location, distance from shore, much greater depth, the presence of a large anchored vessel on the fault site which appears to be the cause of the damage and other characteristics of the event.'"

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