Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: The dual purpose of common people (Score 4, Insightful) 395

1) Criminals or potential criminals. People not to be entrusted with information regarding important dangers the country faces.

2) Brave men and women who fight in wars and give their lives for their country.

1 and 2 are the same people, viewed at different angles for different purposes. I find it sad that people who are expected to give their lives for their country if need be are not deemed worthy of knowing more about the inner workings of their country. Instead they are spied upon and, under a magnifying glass, treated as insignificant. We should all have the right to understand the inner workings of our country and take part in shaping its security and its future.

Comment: Re:Seriously? (Score 1) 506

by thereitis (#44675687) Attached to: The Greatest Keyboard Shortcut Ever

We can only talk about something for about 2 days here, and then container story gets buried no matter how important the topic.

I've thought of this as a problem as well. Slashdot also disables comments on a story after some time. One thought I had was the ability to post stories under a set of tags, and people could view all the stories under a set of tags and view all the comments under a set of tags. Hopefully the tags wouldn't dilute the conversation too much - I'm not sure it's a good idea, actually, but might spark someone's imagination.

Books

Calibre Version 1.0 Released After 7 Years of Development 193

Posted by timothy
from the that-is-some-conservative-numbering dept.
Calibre is a feature-laden, open source e-book manager; many readers mentioned in light of the recently posted news about Barnes & Noble's Nook that they use Calibre to deal with their reading material. Reader Trashcan Romeo writes with some news on its new 1.0 release, summing it up thus: "The new version of the premier e-book management application boasts a completely re-written database backend and PDF output engine as well a new book-cover grid view."

Comment: Re:Well... we knew it was comming. (Score 1) 427

by thereitis (#44633595) Attached to: US States Banned From Exporting Trash To China Are Drowning In Plastic
A video explaining plastic to oil conversion. I noticed in the video that all the plastics were perfectly clean. Recycle bins are a lot dirtier. How much water would have to be used in this process to clean the plastics? Can the poisonous gases generated be burned off safely? Interesting tech, anyway.

Comment: Re:Fix Minecraft x 1.6.x sucks donkey balls (Score 1) 178

It makes no sense that horse armour can't be crafted. I hope they change it. The new launcher is a step in the right direction - upgrades were a killer for bukkit servers since you couldn't play them after a client game (until the server also upgraded). Now at least you have a fairly straight-forward way to play on servers running older software. I wish horses could be summoned like on World of Warcraft. In their current form your horse is basically locked to a continent unless you want to build a massive bridge to get somewhere else. Horses also wander off too quickly. Can't even cut down a tree without having to go and chase it down. I also find the constant need to get XP to repair items is makes minecraft "grindy". I use my tools/weapons to gather resources and the XP I get is enough to keep them repaired, but more often not enough left to enchant new tools.

Comment: Re:Take a breath, get some perspective. (Score 1) 312

by thereitis (#44584593) Attached to: NSA Broke Privacy Rules Thousands of Times Per Year, Audit Finds
You're right, it isn't an either/or proposition, and yet some people are clamoring for the NSA to be shut down (the "flying blind" choice). But imagine a continuum between "flying blind" and "sacrificing privacy of X thousand citizens" where greater intelligence gathering correlates with greater privacy invasion. Somewhere along the line there will be a point around which the majority of people say "yeah, this is the right balance", don't you think? Is it possible to avoid *any* collateral damage while retaining an effective level of intelligence?

Comment: Re:Take a breath, get some perspective. (Score 0) 312

by thereitis (#44583851) Attached to: NSA Broke Privacy Rules Thousands of Times Per Year, Audit Finds
I've come to think that any person or organization with an important enough purpose can get away with most things. Some examples: Even a convicted murderer can get off the hook if they help bust a giant racketeering ring; a failing multi-billion dollar company will get bailed out by the government if it is a big enough backbone for the country's economy. In this case, an agency as important to the security of the USA as the NSA will be allowed to continue operating as-is despite a relatively small number of infractions. If the choice was between "flying blind" and "having massive intelligence but sacrificing privacy of X thousand citizens" I think the choice is pretty clear.

Comment: Re:No (Score 0) 772

by thereitis (#44507823) Attached to: Should the Next 'Doctor Who' Be a Woman?
Genius! Actually... I probably would watch that. :)

I'm actually not a Doctor Who fan (nothing against it... i'm too impatient to watch it) so I may be misunderstanding how "regeneration" works, but imagine for a second a Doctor who's been a man for over 10 generations who wakes up to realize he's now a woman! It might be interesting if they scripted it as if the woman still had the mind of the original male Doctor. "man realizes how some people treat women" angle. "man can't wait to be a man again" "man spends too long in the shower washing his privates" I dunno. :)

10.0 times 0.1 is hardly ever 1.0.

Working...