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Comment: Re:This is why markets are not a good model for go (Score 5, Informative) 120

by Cyberdyne (#49313937) Attached to: FTC's Internal Memo On Google Teaches Companies a Terrible Lesson

The government should not be constrained by market assumptions, such as that resources are limited because of efficient allocation.

That's not a "market assumption", it's plain old reality: resources are finite, so you need priorities. If a cop pulls someone over for speeding, then sees an armed robbery in progress, or a paramedic is treating someone's sprained ankle then a bystander has a heart attack, do you want them to stick to what they were doing and reject the notion of priorities as being a "market assumption"? I'd rather they focus their efforts on the higher priority, because that gives the best outcomes.

In this case, the FTC had more pressing enforcement jobs, like telemarketing scams, the fight with cellphone companies over ripoff premium services ... they felt putting their resources there made more sense than fighting Google over the order of search results, and I'm not at all sure they were wrong about that.

By coincidence, I was discussing law enforcement priorities at work on Friday (we teach computer forensics for law enforcement, among other things); unlike the world of CSI, real law enforcement doesn't go spending days testing out an obscure theory, or digging into every possible detail of each case: they do enough work on a case to pass it to the next stage, then get on with the next case. No "market" - there just aren't an unlimited number of hours in each forensic caseworker's day.

Comment: Re:so, the key to amnesty... (Score 1) 322

by jawtheshark (#49284859) Attached to: Microsoft Offers Pirates Amnesty and Free Windows 10 Upgrades
I run XP Pro in a Xen DomU, which I can access over RDP using a VPN or a SSH tunnel. It is, by far, the most stable XP installation I ever had and I only use it when necessary. Test a website for work from XP? No problem! The oddball software I can't get for Linux? Same thing.

The best part: It is "Gold" as in , I have a perfect installation. Something goes wrong, and I got back to the LVM snapshot where it was pristine. This never happened, but sometimes, instead of uninstalling stuff I need to test, I just rollback any way. It runs wonderfully on one E3-1260L core and 512MB RAM.

This is exactly how Windows XP should be used these days, and it works perfectly fine. XP for Win32 functionality, the rest on Linux.

Comment: Re:It still helps (Score 1) 101

by Cyberdyne (#49152807) Attached to: Twitter Adds "Report Dox" Option

And it would be trivial to keep any "clean" account(s) they have on a separate IP,

Trivial, perhaps... but over time it's easy to slip and use an IP that's more traceable to you, which is why I said to publish all of the IP's that handle has posted from.

I can see some appeal to that, but surely any sane leaker will post using a restaurant's free wifi or similar - meaning their doxing gets associated with any other innocent user who happens to have posted updates from that restaurant, with no apparent link to their own isolated accounts?

Personally, I'd probably use the free wifi at the railway station on my daily commute - indeed, I do use it most days, for innocent purposes - or if I wanted to do something that might be traced, ride an hour or so on one of the lines and use another station on the network, using a randomised MAC address on a laptop. Anyone who was identified as associated with me then is completely uninvolved. Yes, maybe you'd catch a few low-level trolls, but you'd be falsely smearing a whole lot of innocent third parties - making the identification worthless anyway.

Comment: Not the right way (Score 5, Insightful) 260

by jawtheshark (#49104551) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Parental Content Control For Free OSs?
The right way is to talk to your kids about these things. Give examples of scams, tell them there is porn, there is violence, and always, always if they feel unsure about something they should talk to you (Mostly for scams, I'm pretty sure they'll handle porn. Hell, even weird porn isn't as bad as seeing ISIS chop someones head off). Software protection is just a crutch, the real protection is education and vigilance.The right way is to talk to your kids about these things. Give examples of scams, tell them there is porn, there is violence, and always, always if they feel unsure about something they should talk to you (Mostly for scams, I'm pretty sure they'll handle porn. Hell, even weird porn isn't as bad as seeing ISIS chop someones head off). Software protection is just a crutch, the real protection is education and vigilance.

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