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Comment: Re:Russia's longer hours... (Score 0) 381 381

"Only about 55% of job-able people are working"

Even if it were true, and I'm not convinced that it is, that's actually a decent number. You'll always have your very rich who don't have to work and your very poor who choose not to, so 100%'s not realistic. Then subtract from that the fact that there still are a lot of single income households where the spouse takes care of the kids rather than working and 55% sounds like a good number over all.

Comment: Re:I used to game... (Score 1) 79 79

I definitely think there are games out there fitting my needs - as I said, I place the blame partly on me for not wanting to do the research to find them.

I do agree that there are a lot of casual "Play this game on the bus on the way to work" games out there for mobile devices. Mobile device gameplay is a whole other ball of wax, though. I would prefer to sit down in front of a large screen and use physical buttons. I suppose I am just old like that. I can see the appeal of mobile gaming, and have played a few over the years.

I suppose one drawback to mobile gaming is the lack of socialization. I am not one to sit down and play a video game on my own very often. I would much rather play in a group. The few games I keep on my iPhone are mobile versions of board games that I play against other people via Game Center.

Comment: I used to game... (Score 4, Interesting) 79 79

Growing up in the 80's, I played video games quite frequently. Now, though, I find myself avoiding them.

One reason is cost. I realize the cost really has probably not gone up that significantly from the NES days, but at that time it was my parents paying for a new console and games. Now I have to figure out how to justify a $60 game.

Another reason is that I much more enjoy a "play for 10-30 minutes, have fun, and then walk away" type of game. MarioKart is a great example of this. I can play with 0-3 other people and have fun. We can play for 10 minutes, or we can play for an hour. When we get done I can put the controller down and not feel like there is more to do. The playability even remains after I have "beat the game". Commingled in there is an easy learning curve. Sure, the game might be challenging, but I do not want to spend an hour just getting the basic controls figured out.

I am sure there are more games that fit this description, but as a casual gamer I am not willing to do the research just to figure out what games are out there. It is far easier to load up an emulator and play the original Castlevania for NES.

The games described int he article do seem to be closer to the type of game I would like to play.

Comment: My experiences (Score 1) 595 595

Disclaimer: I work in tech, and have a basic understanding of networking. I am far from a full-time network engineer, however.

A few weeks ago I finally turned on IPv6 on my ISP-provided modem/router from CenturyLink. I confirmed using several devices that it is working.

What I have seen is that during normal browsing (almost all under OS X or iOS), there is more stalling and pages that fail to load. It is a small number, probably 1-3% of pages. This is a noticeable increase from pre-IPv6.

I do not have the interest to try to narrow down what is causing this. It could be OS X/iOS's networking stack, it could be a problem with the servers doing a dual IP stack implementation, or something else entirely.

When people ask if everyone is ready for IPv6, my question now is "Is the software ready for IPv6?"

Comment: Added responsibilities = added compensation (Score 2) 583 583

I realize this would be difficult as a first-job type, but be very careful about taking on added responsibilities without any discussion with the powers-that-be about compensation. It is very easy for a "go-getter" to take on a lot more but never be recognized for those added responsibilities.

If nothing else, annual reviews should be an opportunity for you to bring up your now changed job description. As others have mentioned, salary negotiation is a key skill. If you are doing more for the company, you should use that as a negotiating advantage.

Oh, and start saving in a 401(k), IRA (Roth or otherwise) as soon as possible.

Comment: Re:Eclipse (Score 1) 443 443

Yeah, I'm holding on to Eclipse until the last possible moment. Android Studio is horribly slow for what I'm doing. The UI editor is much nicer, but I almost never use that aspect. Simply typing spikes AS up to 100% CPU and kills my laptop's battery when I try to code off A/C power. The compilation process is even worse. No errors until you compile, as opposed to Eclipse's immediate error-on-save feedback. I find it funny that people consider Eclipse "slow" for Android development. In my experience, Eclipse runs like a coked out rabbit in comparison to Android Studio's three-legged sedated turtle.

Comment: A few points (Score 2) 509 509

1) The problem I see with the "Am I free to go?" question is that in all of the recorded interactions I have seen, the police officer more often than not just ignores the question.

Police: "Sir, can you tell me your address?"
Citizen: "Am I free to go?"
Police: "Sir, I need your address so I know if you should be on this street."
Citizen: "Am I free to go?"
Police: "Sir, do you live on this street or not?" ...and so on. Eventually the police officer will either concede the person is free to go, or will call for assistance.

2) For all of the talk about "99.6% of officers do not abuse their power", I have a problem when 99.6% of officers willingly choose to cover for the 0.4% that abuse their power. In my mind, that means that the 99.6% are also guilty of abusing their power, this time by not investigating and arresting criminals - in this case their coworkers.

If a big city police department was found to completely ignore the crimes of another subset of the population, that would be described as a corrupt police department. The fact that the subset in this question is the very same police department should not make a difference.

3) I am always confused by the "Let the investigation run its course, do not give in to the demands for immediate justice" calls that follow incidents of police brutality caught on tape. If someone records me shooting someone as they are running away from me, you had better believe I would be arrested as soon as the police located me. Putting me on paid leave for a few weeks while they "investigate"?

4) As was seen in the Baltimore riots and countless other major protests before, the police, as a department-wide policy, have no problem locking people up for 24-48 hours and then releasing them without charging them with anything.

The few people that are charged are caught in the catch-22 of being charged with resisting arrest, but no other crime. Their only crime was verbally and/or physically trying to prevent an officer from handcuffing them when the protestor was not doing anything illegal in the first place.

5) At what point do we start holding North Carolina officers responsible when they unconstitutionally pull people over for a burned-out rear tail light? NC law only requires a single "stop lamp" on the rear of a car. The Walter Scott incident should have never happened, as it is reasonable for NC officers to know by now that NC law has held being pulled over for only a failed brake light is unconstitutional.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 3, Informative) 193 193

Apparently you stopped following things back in 2006. California is not bankrupt and is doing quite fine financially. They chose actual economics over the "tickle down" nonsense of the likes of Texas and Kansas. With the massive drop in oil prices, Texas is hurting (their financial "success" during the recession was always due to rises in Oil & Gas rather than any special policy). California has other issues, but they aren't financial.

Comment: Re:Auditing (Score 1) 262 262

I don't know... I almost had the power cut at my house because some idiot called up and 1) asked to turn on power at my address and then 2) called back a few days later saying, "oops, I gave the wrong address, please turn power on at my correct address instead." So clearly, the power company went back, looked at the long-running multi-year record that I had with them, figured out the mistake, and silently fixed things; right? No... They marked the account as canceled and promptly mailed a letter saying my power will be turned off in 3 days if I do not call and set up a new account by then. If this can happen with something as critical as electricity, it's entirely possible Comcast really does have no idea who made these changes.

Comment: Re:If support calls you an A, it's a badge of hono (Score 2) 262 262

Having worked Tech Support for a dial-up ISP years ago, I can attest to the "100 idiots for every intelligent person" problem. You call and believe the CS rep to be an idiot, but you need to understand that the CS rep probably thinks the same about you. Don't get me wrong, in my experience, most CS reps *are* idiots. But having worked as one briefly, most customers are too.

Comment: Re:Speeding not always an issue (Score 3, Informative) 335 335

Google for 'speed 85th percentile'

A good explanation of setting speed limits at the 85th percentile. This is by a pro-motorist group, so you could claim bias. The other results on that google search are from government pages, both state and federal, and should be trusted.

For those too lazy to follow the links, countless studies have shown that the safest place to set a speed limit is the 85th percentile of vehicles on a given road. Going too slow has an increased chance of accident, and exceeding the 90th percentile also shows an increased chance of accident.

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