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Comment: Added responsibilities = added compensation (Score 2) 567

I realize this would be difficult as a first-job type, but be very careful about taking on added responsibilities without any discussion with the powers-that-be about compensation. It is very easy for a "go-getter" to take on a lot more but never be recognized for those added responsibilities.

If nothing else, annual reviews should be an opportunity for you to bring up your now changed job description. As others have mentioned, salary negotiation is a key skill. If you are doing more for the company, you should use that as a negotiating advantage.

Oh, and start saving in a 401(k), IRA (Roth or otherwise) as soon as possible.

Comment: Re:Eclipse (Score 1) 443

by alcmena (#49731871) Attached to: Choosing the Right IDE
Yeah, I'm holding on to Eclipse until the last possible moment. Android Studio is horribly slow for what I'm doing. The UI editor is much nicer, but I almost never use that aspect. Simply typing spikes AS up to 100% CPU and kills my laptop's battery when I try to code off A/C power. The compilation process is even worse. No errors until you compile, as opposed to Eclipse's immediate error-on-save feedback. I find it funny that people consider Eclipse "slow" for Android development. In my experience, Eclipse runs like a coked out rabbit in comparison to Android Studio's three-legged sedated turtle.

Comment: A few points (Score 2) 509

by singularity (#49638997) Attached to: What To Say When the Police Tell You To Stop Filming Them

1) The problem I see with the "Am I free to go?" question is that in all of the recorded interactions I have seen, the police officer more often than not just ignores the question.

Police: "Sir, can you tell me your address?"
Citizen: "Am I free to go?"
Police: "Sir, I need your address so I know if you should be on this street."
Citizen: "Am I free to go?"
Police: "Sir, do you live on this street or not?" ...and so on. Eventually the police officer will either concede the person is free to go, or will call for assistance.

2) For all of the talk about "99.6% of officers do not abuse their power", I have a problem when 99.6% of officers willingly choose to cover for the 0.4% that abuse their power. In my mind, that means that the 99.6% are also guilty of abusing their power, this time by not investigating and arresting criminals - in this case their coworkers.

If a big city police department was found to completely ignore the crimes of another subset of the population, that would be described as a corrupt police department. The fact that the subset in this question is the very same police department should not make a difference.

3) I am always confused by the "Let the investigation run its course, do not give in to the demands for immediate justice" calls that follow incidents of police brutality caught on tape. If someone records me shooting someone as they are running away from me, you had better believe I would be arrested as soon as the police located me. Putting me on paid leave for a few weeks while they "investigate"?

4) As was seen in the Baltimore riots and countless other major protests before, the police, as a department-wide policy, have no problem locking people up for 24-48 hours and then releasing them without charging them with anything.

The few people that are charged are caught in the catch-22 of being charged with resisting arrest, but no other crime. Their only crime was verbally and/or physically trying to prevent an officer from handcuffing them when the protestor was not doing anything illegal in the first place.

5) At what point do we start holding North Carolina officers responsible when they unconstitutionally pull people over for a burned-out rear tail light? NC law only requires a single "stop lamp" on the rear of a car. The Walter Scott incident should have never happened, as it is reasonable for NC officers to know by now that NC law has held being pulled over for only a failed brake light is unconstitutional.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 3, Informative) 193

by alcmena (#49574259) Attached to: Massachusetts Governor Introduces Bill To Regulate Uber, Lyft
Apparently you stopped following things back in 2006. California is not bankrupt and is doing quite fine financially. They chose actual economics over the "tickle down" nonsense of the likes of Texas and Kansas. With the massive drop in oil prices, Texas is hurting (their financial "success" during the recession was always due to rises in Oil & Gas rather than any special policy). California has other issues, but they aren't financial.

Comment: Re:Auditing (Score 1) 262

by alcmena (#48948773) Attached to: Comcast Employees Change Customer Names To 'Dummy' and Other Insults
I don't know... I almost had the power cut at my house because some idiot called up and 1) asked to turn on power at my address and then 2) called back a few days later saying, "oops, I gave the wrong address, please turn power on at my correct address instead." So clearly, the power company went back, looked at the long-running multi-year record that I had with them, figured out the mistake, and silently fixed things; right? No... They marked the account as canceled and promptly mailed a letter saying my power will be turned off in 3 days if I do not call and set up a new account by then. If this can happen with something as critical as electricity, it's entirely possible Comcast really does have no idea who made these changes.

Comment: Re:If support calls you an A, it's a badge of hono (Score 2) 262

by alcmena (#48948729) Attached to: Comcast Employees Change Customer Names To 'Dummy' and Other Insults
Having worked Tech Support for a dial-up ISP years ago, I can attest to the "100 idiots for every intelligent person" problem. You call and believe the CS rep to be an idiot, but you need to understand that the CS rep probably thinks the same about you. Don't get me wrong, in my experience, most CS reps *are* idiots. But having worked as one briefly, most customers are too.

Comment: Re:Speeding not always an issue (Score 3, Informative) 335

by singularity (#48705463) Attached to: Out With the Red-Light Cameras, In With the Speeding Cameras

Google for 'speed 85th percentile'

A good explanation of setting speed limits at the 85th percentile. This is by a pro-motorist group, so you could claim bias. The other results on that google search are from government pages, both state and federal, and should be trusted.

For those too lazy to follow the links, countless studies have shown that the safest place to set a speed limit is the 85th percentile of vehicles on a given road. Going too slow has an increased chance of accident, and exceeding the 90th percentile also shows an increased chance of accident.

Comment: "Smart" watch? (Score 1) 471

by singularity (#47873235) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Smartwatch Apps Could You See Yourself Using?

I suppose you could say I have one - actually I have three.

I started with a Garmin FR 405, got a FR60, and recently upgraded to an Garmin FR 220.

I am an avid runner, and they all track my workouts. The 405 and 220 are GPS watches. I have heart rate monitors (chest-strap, which I trust a thousand times more than a wrist-based solution at this point). The 405 was fairly large on my wrist, but the FR60 and 220 are actually reasonably sized.

They revolutionized my training when I started wearing them five years ago. I can get instantaneous feedback while I run, and I can track mileage and pace information over an entire season. I run faster now because of the Garmins, and my workouts are more intelligent.

Granted I only wear them while working out. I like not having to strap a phone to my body to get additional data, and I like that they are dedicated devices for the task. The FR60 goes months or years between battery changes, and the 220 can do a long weekend's worth of runs on a single charge. As just a watch the 220 can last weeks between charges.

The rest of them time I am content pulling my phone out of my pocket to check the time, see alerts, and so on. The Pebble is interesting (mainly because I see it as letting me know how important that last vibrate from my phone was), but I simply cannot justify it yet.

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