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Comment: This is the best reason to run desktop Linux (Score 1) 606

by theantix (#29761001) Attached to: Do You Provide Tech Support To Friends and Family?

"Sorry, I don't know much about how that works Windows. I run Linux and don't come across those types of problems."

Which is true, and possible to say without being condescending. I'm not telling them to use Linux (which could be seen as arrogant), but I literally don't know how to help them and slightly nudging them towards the idea that their own choice in OS has led to the problem they are facing.

Science

New Superconductor World Record Surpasses 250K 271

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the and-a-new-hobby-is-born dept.
myrrdyn writes to tell us that a new superconductivity record high of 254 Kelvin (-19C, -2F) has been recorded. According to the article this is the first time a superconductive state has been observed at a temperature comparable to a household freezer. "This achievement was accomplished by combining two previously successful structure types: the upper part of a 9212/2212C and the lower part of a 1223. The chemical elements remain the same as those used in the 242K material announced in May 2009. The host compound has the formula (Tl4Ba)Ba2Ca2Cu7Oy and is believed to attain 254K superconductivity when a 9223 structure forms"
Security

Null-Prefix SSL Certificate For PayPal Released 351

Posted by kdawson
from the don't-mess-with-mister-inbetween dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Nine weeks after Moxie Marlinspike presented at Defcon 17, null-prefix certificates that exploit the SSL certificate vulnerability are beginning to appear. Yesterday, someone posted a null-prefix certificate for www.paypal.com on the full-disclosure mailing list. In conjunction with sslsniff, this certificate can be used to intercept communication to PayPal from all clients using the Windows Crypto API, for which a patch is still not available. This includes IE, Chrome, and Safari on Windows. What's worse, because of the OCSP attack that Moxie also presented at Defcon, this certificate cannot be revoked." Update: 10/06 23:19 GMT by KD: Now it seems that PayPal has suspended Marlinspike's account.

Comment: Bethesda's DLC can be very worthwhile (Score 1) 93

by theantix (#27573553) Attached to: Bethesda Talks DLC Size and Limitations

Contrary to the naysayers here, I think Bethesda has done a great job with DLC. Shivering Isles is bigger than most full $50 games (I am at 120 hours and counting), well worth the price to add more depth even to a ludicrously huge game like Oblivion (over 480 hours for me).

Likewise, when you consider other games Fallout 3 was a bargain when you consider cost, entertainment value, and time. Even more so compared to other mainstream forms of entertainment. If they'd release any of the Fallout3 DLC for the PS3 I'd buy some in a heartbeat, fully expecting them to be worthwhile as well.

Comment: Re:Nice (Score 1) 155

by theantix (#26047281) Attached to: Sun's Mickos Is OK With Monty's MySQL 5.1 Rant

Full Text Search does not belong in a relational database engine. None of them do it well compared to dedicated FTSE like Sphinx Search or Lucene, not Postgres, not MyISAM FULLTEXT, and not Mssql.

Thus only consider InnoDB for MySQL data storage, it supports transactions, FK support, and safe crash recovery.

Comment: Re:"Fair and balanced" summary?? (Score 3, Insightful) 175

by theantix (#25948101) Attached to: MySQL 5.1 Released, Not Quite Up To Par

What you responded to was an out of context quote, which by omission seemed to combine two sentences. In context my words might be less valium-inducing to you.
"""
Obviously 5.1 is not a perfect release. Quality is critically important to a database and I hope MySQL/Sun takes note of Montyâ(TM)s concerns, especially about core developers working on fun new projects like Drizzle and leaving relatively inexperienced developers fixing bugs in their core business product.

However in my opinion MySQL 5.1 a very good release, long ready for general production usage. Definitely test it before you use it, like you should also test new kernels, Apache versions, distribution releases, etc. But do not alow this sensationalist blog post to overshadow what should be considered a solid engineering accomplishment by the MySQL team.
"""

What Should I Do With My Tech Junk? 521

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the i-got-a-whole-closet-full dept.
Thomas Matysik writes "I'm attempting to de-clutter my house and I've hit a rough patch: the computer room. I've got a bunch of wires, hardware and software that (I think) were useful at one point in time, but these days it doesn't do much more than take up space. Selling it seems like it'd be a huge hassle and it seems really wasteful for me to just pitch all of this stuff in the dumpster. I've considered giving it away to Goodwill, but I'm afraid that's not the right sort of outlet for this stuff. My question: what should I do with all of my tech junk?"
Yahoo!

Yahoo Offers Compensation For Unplayable Music 143

Posted by samzenpus
from the no-music-for-you dept.
DrEnter writes "According to this article, Yahoo will offer some compensation after they turn off their DRM servers and Yahoo Music customers will no longer be able to access their music. The company said Wednesday it is offering coupons on request for people to buy songs again through Yahoo's new partner, RealNetworks Inc.'s Rhapsody. Those songs will be in the MP3 format, free of copy protection. Refunds are available for users who 'have serious problems with this arrangement,' Yahoo said. Nice to see them step up and do something, especially without trading one DRM scheme for another."
Spam

What Happens When You Reply To ALL of Your Spam 402

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the i'm-sure-it-really-helps dept.
bednarz writes "For Tracy Mooney, a married mother of three in Naperville, Ill., the decision to abandon cyber-sense and invite e-mail spam into her life for a month by participating in a McAfee experiment was a bit of a lark. The idea of the Spammed Persistently All Month (S.P.A.M.) experiment — which fittingly started on April Fool's Day — was to have 50 volunteers from around the world answer every spam message and pop-up ad they got. Mooney was game, especially since McAfee was giving a free PC to all participants. She told her story to Network World."

Move Over AJAX, Make Room for ARAX 409

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the not-a-typo dept.
sasserstyl writes "eWeek reports that Microsoft's Silverlight platform will support Ruby client-side scripting, enabling ARAX — or Asynchronous Ruby and XML. Would be cool to have the option to script client-side in something other than Javascript. 'In essence, using ARAX, Ruby developers would not have to go through the machinations of using something like the RJS (Ruby JavaScript) utility, where they write Ruby code and RJS generates JavaScript code to run on the client, Lam said. "Sure, you could do it that way, but then at some point you might have to add some JavaScript code that adds some custom functionality on the client yourself," he said. "So there's always that sense of, 'Now I'm in another world. And wouldn't it be nice if I have this utility class I wrote in Ruby...' Today if I want to use it in the browser I have to port it to JavaScript. Now I can just run it in the browser."'"
Media

MediaDefender's BitTorrent-Based DOS Takes Down Revision3 426

Posted by timothy
from the well-that's-certainly-reasonable dept.
Sandman1971 writes "Over the long Memorial Day weekend, Revision3 was the target of a malicious Denial Of Service Attack which brought R3 to its knees. After investigating the matter, it was discovered that the source of the attacks came from MediaDefender, the famed company hired by the MPAA and RIAA to try and stop the spread of illegal file sharing. The kicker? Revision3 was taken down for running a bittorent tracker to distribute its own legal content."
Google

Google's Shareholders Vote Against Human Rights 376

Posted by kdawson
from the easier-not-to-be-evil-before-the-ipo dept.
yo_cruyff notes a Computerworld article on Google's recent annual shareholder meeting, which was dominated by argument over the company's human rights policies. Google's shareholders, on advice from their board, have voted down two proposals on Thursday that would have compelled Google to change its policies. "Google [has been] coming under fire for operating a version of its search engine that complies with China's censorship rules. Google argues that it's better for it to have a presence in the country and to offer people some information, rather than for it not to be active in China at all... [S]hareholders and rights groups including Amnesty International... continue to push Google to improve its policies in countries known for human rights abuses and limits on freedom of speech... Sergey Brin, cofounder and president of technology for Google, abstained from voting on either of the proposals. 'I agreed with the spirit of these proposals,' Brin said. But he said he didn't fully support them as they were written, and so did not want to vote for them."
Patents

Nathan Myhrvold and the Business Of Invention 137

Posted by Soulskill
from the ok-let's-run-with-that dept.
elwinc writes "There's a great New Yorker story about Nathan Myhrvold's Intellectual Ventures company, whose business model is to nurture ideas, write patents, and sell them. Apparently they're filing about 500 patents a year including a passive thorium reactor which consumes waste from conventional reactors. On the lighter side, you can read how Nathan has achieved 'dominant T. rex market share.'" Though we've discussed Myhrvold and his company in the past, the New Yorker focuses more on how incredible it is to have a group of very intelligent people sitting around a table developing ideas.

No hardware designer should be allowed to produce any piece of hardware until three software guys have signed off for it. -- Andy Tanenbaum

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