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Comment: Re:I couldn't care less (Score 1) 661

by the_weasel (#32960766) Attached to: 4 Cores? 6 Cores? Do You Care?

"I might look at the specs a bit but frankly I couldn't tell you what processor is in the one I currently have."

Oh my god, people like this are on Slashdot?!

Yes there are. We probably outnumber 'people like you'.

99% of the work I do could (and is) done on a 4 year old laptop. I can't remember what CPU is in it (AMD, Intel, TI-99?) and couldn't be bothered to look it up. If I need to know, I'll figure it out then.

When it breaks, I'll do a little research and get a new one, but since my price bracket will likely be sub $1000, I'm much more interested in how much ram is on board, does the chassis run cool, is there a built in webcam for skype calls and is the keyboard sensibly laid out (to name a few). The ergonomics and features of the system are so much more important than the CPU to me, I can't imagine spending more than an hour or so googling to make sure there are no CPU's to avoid.

The graphics workstations we purchase for the artists in the company are another matter, and I could recite the specifications for those to a ridiculous level of detail.

Security

+ - Google Gives Microsoft 5 Days to Fix XP Zero-Day->

Submitted by CWmike
CWmike (1292728) writes "Google engineer Tavis Ormandy published attack code on Thursday that exploits a zero-day vulnerability in Windows XP. Security experts objected to the way he disclosed the bug — just five days after it was reported to Microsoft — and said the move is more evidence of the ongoing, and increasingly public, war between the two giants. Microsoft said it is investigating the vulnerability and would have more information on its next steps later on Thursday. Researchers at French security vendor Vulpen Security confirmed that Ormandy's proof-of-concept works as advertised on Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) and SP3 machines running Internet Explorer 7 or IE8. Ormandy said he decided to go public because of its severity, and, 'If I had reported the ... issue without a working exploit, I would have been ignored.' He also slammed the concept of 'responsible disclosure,' a term that Microsoft and others apply to bug reports submitted privately, giving developers time to patch before the information is publicly released. Microsoft took Ormandy to task for giving it less than a week to deal with his report. And Microsoft was not the only one. Robert Hansen, CEO of SecTheory, chastised Google for claiming that the company abides by responsible disclosure when its security researchers do not. 'Their researchers are going off half-cocked,' said Hansen, who deplored Ormandy's quick publication. 'It just doesn't add up.'"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:alright (Score 1) 861

I'm not dissing your whole idea here, but the infrastructure to provide the movies the way you describe IS a distribution channel, and has it's own costs. Costs which are not necessarily cheaper than pressing a bunch of dvd's and sending them out.

The physical media and packaging is not the bulk of what you are paying for.

Having said that, I'm part of the movie making business - I do this for a living. So while I'm with you on the need for better distribution channels, anyone who starts spouting those crap justifications of cost, convenience, blah blah blah as reasons why they download and distribute copies without paying can go to court, in my opinion. (and hell). And yes, bittorrent is distribution.

Your leverage as a consumer is NOT to consume products whose value you feel is not worth the cost. These are movies, not necessities..

Note: not accusing parent poster of this mindset, as he said nothing that would lead me to think he justifies his/her actions this way. Just venting.

Science

Sweet, Sour, Salty, Bitter, Protein ... and Now Fat 210

Posted by timothy
from the visit-the-chiba-clinic-for-an-upgrade dept.
ral writes "The human tongue can taste more than sweet, sour, salty, bitter and protein. Researchers have added fat to that list. Dr. Russell Keast, an exercise and nutrition sciences professor at Deakin University in Melbourne, told Slashfood, 'This makes logical sense. We have sweet to identify carbohydrate/sugars, and umami to identify protein/amino acids, so we could expect a taste to identify the other macronutrient: fat.' In the Deakin study, which appears in the latest issue of the British Journal of Nutrition, Dr. Keast and his team gave a group of 33 people fatty acids found in common foods, mixed in with nonfat milk to disguise the telltale fat texture. All 33 could detect the fatty acids to at least a small degree."

Comment: Re:Phones. (Score 1) 585

by the_weasel (#30899242) Attached to: The Cell Phone Has Changed — New Etiquette Needed

Oh you are that GUY.

      Die.

Seriously, if you can't see how it might be distracting for the person behind you when you pull out you nice bright shiny phone and start messing with it in a theater, you either lack basic intelligence, or eyes. The other possibility is that you are trolling - if so, grow up a little.

I kind of hope you are trolling, because I keep hoping the human race can't possibly contain members as stupid as you sound right now.

Comment: Re:If he's smart... (Score 1) 1079

by the_weasel (#30417752) Attached to: Sci-Fi Author Peter Watts Beaten, Charged During Border Crossing

Read some of the comments above, or Peter Watts own blog. The fact is that he was traveling out of Michigan, not into Michigan. Just that simple fact alone is wrong. The press coverage is entirely unreliable.

I agree, I want to see the video. I am a Canadian citizen living in California. To be honest, traveling to and from the United States has become nightmarish. We have enough anecdotal tales from other posters, I won't add mine. But I can certainly sympathize with someone reacting poorly to Customs officials rooting through my trunk while I was forced to remain in the front seat.

The address for sending Freedom of Information requests was posted in a comment above, but I'll post it again.

Paul Colpitts
Access to Information and Privacy Coordinator
410 Laurier Avenue West, 11th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0L8
Telephone: 613-941-7431
Facsimile: 613-957-6408
ATIP-AIPRP@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

If you are a Canadian citizen, and you want to know, send that in. I've met Peter Watts, he struck me as a very reasonable man. I'd certainly like to know more.

Comment: Re:A little pseudocode is in order... (Score 1) 137

by the_weasel (#28801461) Attached to: Pirate Bay's Anonymity Service Enters Beta Testing

Nah, If you plan on providing criticism on the syntax of pseudo code (which is absurd), I can only reply to the sheer ridiculousness by pointing out how your own code is unsafe.

See, I write a lot of code in languages you probably have a glib and witty remark about, like Lua. In Lua, the command

    if (isTrue)

would return true if isTrue was equal to 7, or 0, or 1, or a table, or anything at all other than explicitly false. So all your check does is see if isTrue is defined, not if its value is true. Thats imprecise, and the sort of lazy bullshit programming that causes bugs.

I don't code in pseudo code, so I am not familiar with the language definitions - maybe it works the same way :-).

Comment: Re:To the toolboxes... (Score 3, Insightful) 251

by the_weasel (#28775701) Attached to: Best Tools For Network Inventory Management?

Amen. Unfortunately there will always be elitist arses who think that just because they know a little bit about some obscure topic, anyone who doesn't is a lazy slacker. I don't have any need for asset tracking of this nature at the moment, but i found the topic interesting, and learned something from the few comments that have appeared so far. The politics and YRO topics bore me to tears. These topics are why I still bother to visit this site.

Comment: Re:Yeah (Score 4, Interesting) 176

by the_weasel (#26523367) Attached to: Presidential Inauguration Hardware and Other Challenges

I send you a text, you respond when you have time. I call you, you have to choose between ignoring me and taking my call. Texting is asynchronous, where a conversation is synchronous. Granted, I can communicate more information in a short amount of time with a phone conversation, but if my issue is non-critical then texting is often more effective.

I am talking about texting from a business prospective here. I often text sales staff on the road, who may well be in a meeting, or contractors on a noisy job site. A director in a meeting with an artist. In all these cases texting not only gets them the information they need without them having o interrupt some other task, it also avoids the need for them to grab a pen or some other device - I just include the information. No lost or misunderstood numbers or names.

Now social texting does confuse me. "OMG! I am at the inaugaration". Why???

In seeking the unattainable, simplicity only gets in the way. -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982

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