Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Comment Re:Not a Final Judgment (Score 1) 170

I see. Sounds like a very sensible policy. So would I be correct in saying that Limewire can (and probably will) appeal?
And that it's merely a confusing bit of argot to say they can't specifically appeal this ruling on the RIAA's motion for summary judgment? But rather, they must wait until there's a Final Judgment (the outcome of which is now virtually certain)?

Yes but a lot can happen between now and then. E.g., settlement discussions, damages award that's livable, motion practice over possible interlocutory appeal, actual interlocutory appeal which results in reversal of all or part of the Court's order, etc., etc.

Comment Re:Holy Biased Article, Batman! (Score 1) 413

Since we know Pres. Obama is a straight ticket 'Progressive'

Obama is a moderate conservative: right wing (favoring the interests of the investment class), socially conservative (opposed to equality for gays and lesbians, opposed to the separation of church and state), and in favor of an aggressive foreign policy. Many of his policies that draw the most clamor from the Fox News set are close to, or even to the right of, those of Reagan or Nixon.

I genuinely despair that this is the truth of the matter for most people in the US.

Comment Short Answer: Yes (Score 1) 504

Yes, they absolutely own the copyright if the terms of your employment make the software you write on the job a work for hire (almost certainly the case unless you have an explicit exception in your employment contract).

They also cannot legally violate the GPL, but they will not even if they keep the source unpublished as long as they provide the source code with any binary distribution to another party.

The key here is that the GPL does not force you to distribute the source unless you distribute the binaries--and even then, you only need to provide the source to the people to whom you distributed the binaries.

Comment Re:Nice (Score 1) 347

People have tried this and failed. There was a company called Silicon Film who produced cartridges which were basically a fold out CCD connected to a small digital storage unit. But there were apparently massive problems with quality. Their website doesn't exist anymore but I found this The other problem was timing. SLRs were 35mm, so likely the e-film manufacturers needed to make 35mm sensors. Back at the dawn of digital when companies tried this making a 35mm sensor was a real challenge. But now where yields are higher and the major DSLR manufacturers have finally made 35mm sensors the norm in their top of the line cameras, everyone already has a digital camera so e-film would again end up with no market. Also nostalgia sometimes doesn't warrant the cost. I certainly wouldn't want to pay $1000 to get a digital sensor in my old Nikon FE. Hassleblad at least has a market where people who would buy this digital back would likely do it because they need it for their job rather than retro chick.

Comment Re:Nasa? (Score 1) 67

Then shouldn't that be the Bbc?

No. According to the BBC style guide, if an acronym is commonly spoken as a word, e.g. LASER, NASA, RADAR, then it is spelt as a normal word; laser, Nasa, radar. However, if the acronym is spoken as a acronym, as a sequence of letters, then it is spelt using all capitals, e.g. BBC, CNN, NSA.

So, is it Mr. Mxyzptlk or Mr. MXYZPTLK?

Sorry, couldn't help it. ;)

Comment It's simple: (Score 1) 284

After a week of losing millions every day, airlines are starting to ask why we can't do better.

Airlines: We want open airspace.
ICAO: Sure, you guys fund the study.
Airlines: ????
ICAO: *Profit*

Sounds pretty open and shut to me on a serious note. Red Tape at it's best.

A committee is a group that keeps the minutes and loses hours. -- Milton Berle