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Comment: Re:Public road is not for joy riding... (Score 1) 571

Right. I feel the same way. I can't stand those naggling ninnies who insist that juggling chainsaws near infants is 'too much risk'.
</sarcasm>

The acceptable level of risk will decrease with increased knowledge and technology. Accept it, because it's going to happen. Luckily, eventually we'll be dead and new generations can enjoy their cotton wool cars.

Comment: Re:Not the only strategy (Score 1) 324

by the grace of R'hllor (#47920137) Attached to: New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

And this amendment to international agreements would force countries to lower their corporate taxes to actually be desirable to companies that want to do business within it. This has as consequences that corporate tax income will remain mostly constant, since the lower taxes will be paid by more corporations, while every non-multinational company will basically be getting a tax break, thus stimulating your own nation's economy at the level where it'll do some good: The local level.

The countries it'll hurt are, for example, my own. The Netherlands isn't tax-less, but we do have corporate tax laws which make us suitable for tax avoidance.

Comment: Re:A solution in search of a problem... (Score 1) 326

In addition to Germany's near strict-liability laws, which mean a driver is virtually always at fault in case of accidents with non-drivers, I'd like to point out the following:
- Most of Germany's road system is non-Autobahn. People are used to driving with restrictions. And are going to be nervously looking about to slam into them with a 100+kph speed difference.
- If you drive faster than the recommended maximum (130-140kph) and there's an accident, regardless of who caused it, your insurance company will try to blame you to at least some degree.
- They drive regular cars, with regular 5 speed gearboxes, for the most part.

That all means Germans tend, as a rule, to not go much faster than normal highway speeds, and yet pay attention more than on other roads.

Comment: Re: all that money (Score 1) 97

by the grace of R'hllor (#47839995) Attached to: Alibaba's US IPO Could Top $20 Billion

"about 0%" means that it isn't 0%. And these people are surrounded by infected people. Who may not have used soap or hand sanitizer anyway.

It's the same thing as herd immunity: If everyone disinfects, then you're good. If a fraction disinfects, then even that fraction is at risk simply by being surrounded by infection sources.

Comment: Re:Calorific value? (Score 1) 588

by the grace of R'hllor (#47806075) Attached to: Low-Carb Diet Trumps Low-Fat Diet In Major New Study

They didn't do caloric restriction here. Apparently, a low carb diet allows people to lose weight better than a low fat diet. People ate how much they wanted. Whether it is because they ate fewer calories or because the body processes the food differently is irrelevant for the conclusion that low-fat works better.

Also, a claim of this study was that fat is *not* bad for you, and better than high carb.

Comment: Re:customer-centric (Score 1) 419

Employees of companies are not legally required to be obedient. They can tell their US bosses 'no'. At which point it would be up to the discretion of the US bosses to decide to take action like firing the Irish employees, or to shrug and say 'oh well'. They are not legally obligated to fire them.

If it's worth hacking on well, it's worth hacking on for money.

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