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Comment: Re:Moral Hazard (Score 4, Insightful) 377

by th1nk (#40859389) Attached to: Algorithmic Trading Glitch Costs Firm $440 Million

No way any of these trades should be unwound. You want to give an algorithm your wallet and let it make lightning trades on your behalf? Fine, but learn to live with the consequences.

These trades aren't being unwound to protect the company with the "glitch". Remember that for every transaction there is a buyer and a seller.

Let's say you owned one of those stocks and had a stop loss in place so that your shares would sell if the price dropped by 25%. You would have been hit and sold your stock near the low on a "glitch".

Still think they should let all the trades stand?

Iphone

Apple Blames Earnings Miss On iPhone 5 Anticipation 242

Posted by Soulskill
from the doesn't-fall-far-from-the-tree dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "Reuters reports that Apple shed more than five percent of its stock price value in after-hours trading after the company reported its second quarterly miss on results in less than a year, highlighting how the Apple brand is becoming less resistant to the economic and product cycles that have plagued rivals. 'Clearly it was a disappointment,' says Channing Smith, Co-Manager of Capital Advisors Growth Fund. 'We expected a lot of consumers will probably delay their upgrade and their purchases until the iPhone 5 comes out. We saw a similar trend occur last year with the iPhone 4S.' Executives acknowledged buyers were refraining from purchases because of 'rumors and speculation' around the iPhone 5, which sources have said will ship in September with a thinner and larger screen. 'The iPhone 5 is already the most hyped device and for it to exceed expectations is going to be really hard,' says BGC Partners analyst Colin Gillis. This is one of many reasons Apple is so notoriously secretive. With the levels of hype that Apple product launches garner, it would undoubtedly crush its own sales if it announced products even months in advance. Instead, Apple slowly and silently draws down inventory in distribution channels, and then the upgraded product is available immediately (or nearly immediately) after it's announced. According to Apple CEO Tim Cook, 'there is an incredible anticipation out there or for future products and as you would expect given what we've been able to deliver in the past.'"

Comment: Re:I'm not going to panic just yet... (Score 2) 411

by th1nk (#40762621) Attached to: NASA Satellite Measurements Show Unprecedented Greenland Ice Sheet Melt

Most believe an average of 5 Degrees Celcius per year, the actual figure is more like 0.5 C per annum.

What the hell are you talking about? Most proponents believe an average of 5 degrees Celsius per year over the last decade? Yeah, a rise of 50 degrees C seems reasonable.

Iphone

Reports Say Apple Is Shrinking Its Docking Connector With iPhone 5 427

Posted by timothy
from the hope-bluetooth-dongles-come-quickly dept.
jones_supa writes "Two sources have told Reuters that Apple's new iPhone will drop the classic wide dock connector used in the company's gadgets for the best part of a decade in favor of a smaller one. The refresh will be a 19-pin connector port at the bottom instead of the previous 30-pin port 'to make room for the earphone moving to the bottom.' That would mean the new phone would not connect with the myriad of accessories playing a part in the current ecosystem of iPods, iPads and iPhones, at least without an adapter. On the upside, a smaller connector will allow for more compact product designs. Some enterprising vendors in China have already begun offering cases for the new phone, complete with earphone socket on the bottom and a 'guarantee' that the dimensions are correct." Gizmodo writer Adrian Covert says it's for your own good.
Science

Science Reveals Why Airplane Food Tastes So Bad 388

Posted by samzenpus
from the fly-the-tasteless-skies dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "At low elevations, the 10,000 or so taste buds in the human mouth work pretty much as nature intended. But step aboard a modern airliner, and the sense of taste loses its bearings. Even before a plane takes off, the atmosphere inside the cabin dries out the nose. As the plane ascends, the change in air pressure numbs about a third of the taste buds, and at 35,000 feet with cabin humidity levels kept low by design to reduce the risk of fuselage corrosion, xerostomia or cotton mouth sets in. This explain why airlines tend to salt and spice food heavily. Without all that extra kick, food tastes bland. 'Ice cream is about the only thing I can think of that tastes good on a plane,' says Marion Nestle, a professor of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University. 'Airlines have a problem with food on board. The packaging, freezing, drying and storage are hard on flavor at any altitude, let alone 30,000 feet.' Challenges abound. Food safety standards require all meals to be cooked first on the ground. After that, they are blast-chilled and refrigerated until they can be stacked on carts and loaded on planes. For safety, open-flame grills and ovens aren't allowed on commercial aircraft, so attendants must contend with convection ovens that blow hot, dry air over the food. 'Getting any food to taste good on a plane is an elusive goal,' says Steve Gundrum, who runs a company that develops new products for the food industry."
Programming

Ask Slashdot: Transitioning From 'Hacker' To 'Engineer'? 446

Posted by Soulskill
from the learn-how-to-sit-through-endless-meetings dept.
antifoidulus writes "I'm about to get my masters in Computer Science and start out (again) in the 'real world.' I already have a job lined up, but there is one thing that is really nagging me. Since my academic work has focused almost solely on computer science and not software engineering per se, I'm really still a 'hacker,' meaning I take a problem, sketch together a rough solution using the appropriate CS algorithms, and then code something up (using a lot of prints to debug). I do some basic testing and then go with it. Obviously, something like that works quite well in the academic environment, but not in the 'real world.' Even at my previous job, which was sort of a jack-of-all-trades (sysadmin, security, support, and programming), the testing procedures were not particularly rigorous, and as a result I don't think I'm really mature as an 'engineer.' So my question to the community is: how do you make the transition from hacker (in the positive sense) to a real engineer. Obviously the 'Mythical Man Month' is on the reading list, but would you recommend anything else? How do you get out of the 'hacker' mindset?"

Comment: Re:Makes sense... (Score 1) 410

by th1nk (#37143748) Attached to: 13-Year-Old Uses Fibonacci Sequence For Solar Power Breakthrough

Oh for the love of god....THAT'S THE POINT ABOUT PRIOR ART! Where the fuck have you been??? That's the point about all these patent challenges, is their prior art. If so, then the patent is invalid. Get a fucking clue!

I couldn't help but read this while hearing the voice of Tom Smykowski...

"Well look, I already told you! I deal with the goddamn customers so the engineers don't have to! I have people skills! I am good at dealing with people! Can't you understand that? What the hell is wrong with you people?"

Biotech

Hybrid Human-Animal DNA Experiments Raise Concerns 311

Posted by Soulskill
from the wonder-what-al-gore-thinks-about-this dept.
Kevin Fishburne writes "British scientists are calling for a new agency to oversee the mixing of human and animal DNA, which is progressing at a rate most may not be aware of: 'Among experimentation that might spark concern are those where human brain cells might change animal brains, those that could lead to the fertilization of human eggs in animals and any modifications of animals that might create attributes considered uniquely human, like facial features, skin or speech. ... Some disagree. "We think some of these should be done, but they should be done in an open way to maintain public confidence," said Robin Lovell-Badge, head of stem cell biology and developmental genetics at Britain's Medical Research Council, one of the expert group members. He said experiments injecting human brain cells into the brains of rats might help develop new stroke treatments or that growing human skin on mice could further understanding of skin cancer.'"
Medicine

Man Demonstrates His New Bionic Hand 124

Posted by Soulskill
from the not-named-luke dept.
digitaldc writes with this excerpt from the BBC: "Last year, Patrick, a 24-year-old Austrian, decided to have his dysfunctional hand amputated and replaced with a bionic hand. He lost the use of his left hand after being electrocuted at work. Here he demonstrates the extra movement his new bionic hand has given him, opening a bottle and tying his shoelaces, and tests a prototype hand which will give him additional wrist movement."

Thufir's a Harkonnen now.

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