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Science

LHC Homes In On Possible Higgs Boson Around 126GeV 210

Posted by timothy
from the abundance-of-caution dept.
New submitter Ginger Unicorn writes "In a seminar held at CERN today, the ATLAS and CMS experiments presented the status of their searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson. Their results are based on the analysis of considerably more data than those presented at the summer conferences, sufficient to make significant progress in the search for the Higgs boson, but not enough to make any conclusive statement on the existence or non-existence of the elusive Higgs. The main conclusion is that the Standard Model Higgs boson, if it exists, is most likely to have a mass constrained to the range 116-130 GeV by the ATLAS experiment, and 115-127 GeV by CMS. Tantalising hints have been seen by both experiments in this mass region, but these are not yet strong enough to claim a discovery."

Comment: Sounds like getting off easy (Score 1) 1307

by tetsukaze (#35857946) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Do I Give IT a Login On Our Dept. Server?
In a hospital environment? All they want is an interactive login? I would say that's pretty hot that they didn't come to your door with torches and pitch forks. You do sound like you know what you're doing, but how people come to IT and say, "Don't worry about, I know what I'm doing." I myself work internal IT at a technology company. "IP Engineers" for our production network saw no problem in plugging in "a hub" to our corporate network. They actually had plugged in a home router. They managed to loop the network, flood it with rogue DHCP traffic and open up an unencrypted wireless network. This from people that are paid (a lot more than me) to run a customer facing network. Long story short, its IT's job to trust no one because most of the time, they're right.
Image

Best Man Rigs Newlyweds' Bed To Tweet During Sex 272 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the nice-feed dept.
When an UK man was asked to be the best man at a friend's wedding he agreed that he would not pull any pranks before or during the ceremony. Now the groom wishes he had extended the agreement to after the blessed occasion as well. The best man snuck into the newlyweds' house while they were away on their honeymoon and placed a pressure-sensitive device under their mattress. The device now automatically tweets when the couple have sex. The updates include the length of activity and how vigorous the act was on a scale of 1-10.
Movies

DRM Flub Prevented 3D Showings of Avatar In Germany 386

Posted by timothy
from the token-of-our-appreciation dept.
Fraggy_the_undead writes "According to German IT news site heise.de, yesterday several 3D showings of Avatar couldn't take place (German; Google translation to English), because the movies were DRM protected such that there had to be a key per copy of the film, per film projector, and per movie server in the theater. The key supplier, by the name Deluxe, was apparently unable to provide a sufficient number of valid keys in time. Moviegoers were offered to get a refund or view an analogue 2D showing instead."

Comment: Physical Security (Score 4, Interesting) 157

So the cheap devices he used only worked inches away. A more powerful device might work up to 20 meters away. Now, I assume a more powerful antennae is going to mean a bigger one. Isn't this going to stand out? I would hope that there is someone in charge that would notice a foot long antennae being pointed at voting areas. You can secure the machine itself, but if you don't have real people doing their part, it doesn't matter how secure your voting machine is.

Comment: Re:It's 1996 again?- The last mile (Score 2, Insightful) 300

by tetsukaze (#29688989) Attached to: FCC Chairman Warns of Wireless Spectrum Gap
This then seems to be the same issue that traditional land based providers run into. It costs a good chunk of money to spread out that way. One of the huge gains of wireless being that the last mile is over the air and essentially free. Note: I'm not trying to be a kill joy here but it seems these companies haven't gone this route already and I think this is the reason.

Comment: Re:It's 1996 again?- Collisions (Score 1) 300

by tetsukaze (#29688725) Attached to: FCC Chairman Warns of Wireless Spectrum Gap
Lets not forget a very important factor. I would love some RF guy to correct me, but radio is like the good old hub days. The air is a shared medium. You throw signals in the air, they will interfere with each other. More towers in this case does not equal more bandwidth, it equals more interference. This is where we need some leap of technology where we can cram more data into smaller channels.

Comment: Re:Thinkpad is worth considering (Score 1) 672

by tetsukaze (#29629569) Attached to: Best Developer's Laptop?
I work almost exclusively with Lenovo Thinkpads and I have to say they are the most solid laptops I have ever touched. For the most part, a laptop is a laptop to me, but reliability is a huge concern for a computer that is constantly being moved around. I feel like I could beat a man to death with one these laptops and google map my escape plan with out any hitches.

Comment: We have low end, now the high end... (Score 4, Interesting) 196

by tetsukaze (#29479815) Attached to: Intel Core I7 For Laptops — First Benchmarks
Where is the middle? Atom based equipment is changing how we define portable computers and is very exciting. These new chips are going to bring amazing power in a portable format. The problem for the average user is that these are two extremes that currently don't help them. The middle of the road laptop that can be used for everyday use has not had any major innovations or significant price drops for some time. I understand diversifying is important, but where is the new tech for that more middle of the road work load?

Comment: Competition is always good (Score 2, Insightful) 123

by tetsukaze (#29462019) Attached to: Microsoft Rushes Out Office Web Apps Preview
I don't use google docs much and what I have used has been pretty disappointing. That being said, there is a lot potential in the concept. I do hate the idea of renting software but at the very least, there will now be two big players in this market. I would really like to see google being driven to make their software feature competitive with microsoft so I can get one more step away from being stuck with a bulky product from Bill.

Comment: The average user is dumb, but doesn't want to be (Score 1) 260

by tetsukaze (#29461883) Attached to: Security / Privacy Advice?
I like the idea of a general education on security. I'm not sure what the motivation was for your corporate overlords, but educating users for their own sake is more likely to get them to be compliant at the workplace. Showing them how easy it is to get bugs from social networking sites and how to avoid them is a great idea. It lets them know how to develop good habits at home and thus they are better behaved at work, making your life easier.

Comment: Re:MacOS 9 (Score 4, Insightful) 875

by tetsukaze (#29457063) Attached to: Old Operating Systems Never Die
In all seriousness, I have also run into people that won't give up on that OS. The amazing part to me is that they don't really have to. Certain tasks do not change and despite the lack of support from Apple and software vendors most of those system are running smoothly. It could be due to the larger install base, but Windows 9x systems I run into that are task specific are plagued with issues.

Stellar rays prove fibbing never pays. Embezzlement is another matter.

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